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Courses: Fall 2014 Expand

    • 20032-01
    • †Advanced Legal Writing
    • Harrison
    • Tue 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Legal Writing (20032). 3 units. This course will provide practice in writing legal memoranda and briefs. Students will have the opportunity to refine analytical as well as writing skills. The goal of the course will be to take students beyond basic competence to excellence in legal writing. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to ten. R.D. Harrison.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10386

    Close
    • 20623-01
    • [The] Art of Argument: How to Write about the Law
    • Bazelon
      Caplan
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    [The] Art of Argument (20623). 2 units, credit/fail. The strong written argument is an essential aspect of effective legal advocacy. Lawyers must know how to convincingly present and marshal evidence for a client's position, in writing that is as clear and sharp as possible. Increasingly, lawyers also make use of the media to advocate for clients and causes.

    To build these skills, this class is designed to teach students how to write for a broad audience--via the op-ed page of a newspaper, a magazine, a general-interest web site or blog, or in a book review to be published in a mainstream media outlet. The class will also discuss the ethics for lawyers of working as sources with the press, the responsibilities of lawyers to their clients in this context, and the responsibilities of journalists to their subjects and to the public. Students will learn how to use the media to educate the public and advocate for issues that are of professional interest. Multiple short writing assignments. Enrollment limited to fifteen. E. Bazelon and L. Caplan.

    Note: First-day attendance is required to hold place, including for any students on a waiting list.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10349

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    • 20663-01
    • Consent
    • Yaffe
      Shapiro
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Consent (20663). 2 units. This seminar will discuss philosophical issues concerning the nature and normative significance of consent, and its bearing on various aspects of the law, emphasizing criminal law. We will be reading and discussing primarily recent work by philosophers of law, but we will also be discussing cases and statutes of relevance to the issues. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. G. Yaffe and S.J. Shapiro.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10488

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    • 20553-01
    • Conservative Critiques of the Administrative State
    • Elliott
    • Fri 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Conservative Critiques of the Administrative State (20553). 2 or 3 units. According to some conservative scholars, American law took a "wrong turn" at the New Deal and the rise of the "Administrative State" is a terrible mistake that should be curtailed or undone. This seminar will consider the arguments of conservative critics, including Friedrich von Hayek, Richard Epstein, Antonin Scalia, and Gary Lawson. A prior course or simultaneous course in Administrative Law is helpful but not required. Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit available. Enrollment limited to twenty. Paper required. E.D. Elliott.

    Note: Class participation counts toward the final grade. No more than three missed classes permitted.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10363

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    • 20259-01
    • †Constitutional Litigation Seminar
    • Walker
      Meyer
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Constitutional Litigation Seminar (20259). 2 units. Federal constitutional adjudication from the vantage of the litigator with an emphasis on Circuit and Supreme Court practice and procedural problems, including jurisdiction, justiciability, exhaustion of remedies, immunities, abstention, and comity. Specific substantive questions of constitutional law currently before the Supreme Court are considered as well. Students will each argue two cases taken from the Supreme Court docket and will write one brief, which may be from that docket, but will likely come from a circuit court decision. Students will also join the faculty members on the bench and will, from time to time, be asked to make brief arguments on very short notice on issues raised in the class. Enrollment limited to twelve. J.M. Walker, Jr., and J. Meyer.

    Note: The first class meeting will be on Wednesday, September 3, at the Law School in room 129. Thereafter, the class will meet at 157 Church Street on the following dates: September 17, 18; October 1, 2, 8, 9; November 5, 6, 12, 13, 19, 20; December 3. All class meetings begin at 4:10 p.m. The break in the middle of the course is designed to give students a time to write the brief.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 11507

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    • 20341-01
    • [The] Constitutional Law of Civil Jury Trial
    • Langbein
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    [The] Constitutional Law of Civil Jury Trial (20341). 3 units. The Seventh Amendment undertakes to "preserve" civil jury trial in "common law" cases. This seminar will explore the history and the modern workings of the Seventh Amendment and comparable state provisions. Among the topics to be considered will be the case law and scholarly literature concerning (1) the origins and the drafting of the Amendment; (2) the types of cases that qualify as "common law" within the meaning of the Amendment; (3) the application of the Amendment to novel causes of action; (4) whether there was or should be an exception for cases of unusual complexity; and (5) the challenges of reconciling various techniques of jury control (including directed verdict, judgment notwithstanding verdict, and summary judgment) with the constitutional text. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twelve. J.H. Langbein.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10400

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    • 20407-01
    • Contracting for Innovation under High Uncertainty
    • Sabel
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Contracting for Innovation under High Uncertainty (20407). 2 units. Firms co-developing new pharmaceuticals or next-generation fuel injection systems or smart phones typically cannot anticipate their respective contributions to the eventual product with anything like the precision needed to form fully specified contracts. Faced with such uncertainty the parties increasingly respond by creating a rich and regular information exchange regime—contracts for innovation—that allows each to ascertain the capacity and intention of the other to meet the emerging demands of cooperation, while maintaining the right to withdraw from the joint effort if collaboration fails. Where the paradigmatic twentieth-century contract focused on the allocation of risk between the parties, contracts for innovation govern their joint response to uncertainty. The seminar examines the design and operation of this novel form of private governance in detail. More generally it explores their role as a link among nodes in the vertically disintegrated, “new” economy and shows how, in the relations it governs, trust is an outcome, not a pre-condition of collaboration. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twelve. C. F. Sabel.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10336

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    • 20192-01
    • Democracy, Diversity and Beauty
    • Kronman
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
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    Democracy, Diversity, and Beauty (20192). 3 units. Is diversity a political or aesthetic value? If both, what is the relation between them? What, more generally, is the relation between the value of diversity, which celebrates the differences among individuals, and the principles of democratic government, which emphasize their equality? And what place is or ought there to be in democratic societies for the public support and celebration of beauty? Readings from Tocqueville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Santayana, Dewey, and contemporary writers. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. A.T. Kronman.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10398

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    • 20255-01
    • Intellectual Production without Intellectual Property
    • Kapczynski
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
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    Intellectual Production without Intellectual Property (20255). 2 units. A great deal of intellectual production occurs beyond the reach of intellectual property law. The field of IP has begun to recognize this, and a new "IP without IP" literature has begun to emerge. This seminar will explore the theoretical foundations for this literature, as well as introduce students to important new work describing the practices and norms of discrete creative communities. Initial readings will orient students to the "law and norms" literature and also to the basics of innovation theory. The class will then explore recent case-studies, for example that describe how magicians, comedians, and French chefs support creativity without IP. The class will also explore recent writings on Wikipedia, open source software, open science, and other so-called "commons-based" modalities of production. Readings and discussions will explore the implications of this literature for our understanding of IP law and innovation policy, and will seek to develop a more general account of where we should expect to see IP without IP, as well as its implications, both for efficiency and for other values, such as democracy or distributive justice. Students will write a seminar paper in lieu of an exam. For example, students may want to either address important theoretical concerns in this emerging field, or undertake their own case studies of creative communities that operate without – or in the shadow of — IP law. The paper will be due at the end of exam period, with the possibility of developing it further as a Substantial Paper or Supervised Analytic Writing paper. The course should be useful for anyone interested in theories of IP and innovation (or in fields that develop competing accounts of creative practice, such as science studies, performance studies, etc.). Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. A. Kapczynski.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10395

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    • 20269-01
    • International Criminal Law
    • Damaska
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
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    International Criminal Law (20269). 2 or 3 units. After a brief survey of the history of international criminal law and the development of international criminal courts, the seminar will examine the problem of sources and goals of international criminal justice. Alternative responses to mass atrocities will be explored. Genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression will then be examined in some detail. Next, the attention of the seminar will focus on the departures of international criminal procedure and evidence from forms of justice prevailing in national law enforcement systems. The seminar will end with an analysis of special difficulties encountered by international criminal courts. Scheduled examination (answers only) or paper option. Enrollment limited to twenty. M.R. Damaška.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10353
    Exam: 1/06/2015 at 2:00 PM SLB: 129
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 2 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your name.

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    • 20337-01
    • Law and Narrative in Jewish Law
    • Halbertal
    • Wed 3:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
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    Law and Narrative in Jewish Law (20337). 2 units. It is a common feature of the diverse canonical sources of Jewish Law that Law and Narrative are interwoven. We will examine the relationship and function of the narrative as both founding, exemplifying and challenging the law within the Jewish tradition. The sources that will be analyzed will be Biblical, Talmudic, and later texts such as Maimonides' great code, in which narrative plays a complex and fascinating role in shaping and directing legal norms. In the class we will examine different cases of such juxtapositions and we will analyze as well the implications of these texts within the broader discussion of legal theory. The texts will be student in English alongside their original language and no knowledge of Hebrew is required. Paper required. Enrollment limited. M. Halbertal.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10337

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    • 20066-01
    • Legislation: Statutory Interpretation
    • Eskridge
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam required
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    Legislation: Statutory Interpretation (20066). 2 units. This course will provide a short introduction to the theory and doctrine of statutory interpretation. (The course is normally offered for 3 units.) The course will begin with a case study of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and will swiftly turn to theories and doctrines of statutory interpretation. Students will test the theories of statutory interpretation against theories of law and the legislative process. The course will analyze the doctrines associated with statutory interpretation in detail. Self-scheduled examination. Enrollment limited to seventy-five. W.N. Eskridge, Jr.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10491
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.5 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

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    • 20357-01
    • *[The] Lives of Lawyers
    • Markovits
      Silber
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Responsibility
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *[The] Lives of Lawyers (20357). 2 or 3 units. This seminar will employ oral histories of Yale Law School graduates, conducted by the seminar's participants, to explore the U.S. legal profession from the middle of the last century through the present day. The first half of the seminar will prepare students to conduct the oral histories. Several sessions will explore the institutional and economic structure of the legal profession and also its moral, political, and social purposes. A second group of sessions will explore oral history, both in theory and in practice. The practical materials will include instruction in "hands-on" interviewing, transcribing, and editing skills. The subjects for the oral histories will be YLS alumni, largely from a single class, recruited and chosen by the instructors. The oral histories that the class produces will be contributed to an archive being constructed and housed in the Yale Law Library. D.S. Markovits and N. Silber.

    Credits To earn 2 units, students will be required to conduct interviews and submit an edited interview transcript and a brief contextualizing introduction. Additional credit is available to those who wish to complete Substantial or Supervised Analytic Writing papers that incorporate the interview into an interpretive and analytic essay.

    Course Bidding: In addition to ranking this course among limited enrollment bids, students should submit a statement of interest that describes the student's main legal preoccupations and background in order to permit us intelligently to match students and subjects. The statements must be submitted by the close of the early registration period on June 26, 2014, at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Once students and subjects are matched, the course cannot be dropped.

    Location: ASH40 - A422 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10408

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    • 20209-01
    • Political Dysfunction and Reform
    • Balkin
      Levinson
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Political Dysfunction and Reform (20209). 2 units. Many Americans increasingly believe that their political system is seriously dysfunctional, due in part to increasing political polarization. This seminar will examine the causes of political dysfunction in the United States. It will consider the extent to which political dysfunction results from features of the Constitution or from other political structures. Finally, the course will consider possible reforms, including changes in the structure of politics, constitutional amendments, and a new constitutional convention. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. J.M. Balkin and S. Levinson.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10346

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    • 20202-01
    • Property, Social Justice, and the Environment
    • Rose
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Property, Social Justice, and the Environment (20202). 2 or 3 units. Private property is sometimes cast as the villain in social and environmental problems, but sometimes it is cast as the solution to the same problems. This seminar will explore the relationship of property to social and environmental concerns in the context of several past and present controversies over property rights. We will begin with some basic theories about the “commons” problem and the ways that property rights do or do not address that problem. Time permitting, other topics will include: land rights for squatters in less developed countries (primarily Latin American, Africa); land reform and development projects (primarily less developed countries); wildlife and fisheries management (global); water management (United States, Asia, Latin America); tradable pollution rights (United States); carbon trading schemes (particularly for tropical forest maintenance) (global, tropical areas); free market environmentalism and private land use restrictions (conservationist or exclusionary?) (United States and global); and indigenous land claims and claims to intellectual property (global). While we will search for common themes about the range, capacities and limitations of property regimes, theoretical purity should not be expected in this overview; moreover, topics may change in response to particular student interest. The class will meet twice weekly during the first seven to eight weeks of the term. Paper required; may be reflective (2 units) or research (3 units). Enrollment limited to fifteen. C.M. Rose.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10420

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    • 20297-01
    • Regulation of Energy Extraction
    • Elliott
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Regulation of Energy Extraction (20297). 2 or 3 units. This course will explore the troubled intersection between energy and environmental policies. We will consider a diverse range of regulatory approaches to minimize adverse environmental effects of various forms of energy development. These include emerging issues regarding hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) in the United States and European Union; regulation of off-shore drilling and lessons from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill; liability for natural resources and other damages from oil spills under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA90); the Fukushima, Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear accidents; applicability of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to oil and coal leases on federal lands; the Endangered Species Act; visual pollution and other issues relating to windfarms; coal mine disasters; mountaintop mining and the Mine Safety Act; and tailings piles and the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). The class will conclude by considering how concerns about climate change may affect the future of energy development. No prerequisites. Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit available. Enrollment limited to twenty. Paper required. E.D. Elliott.

    Note: No more than three absences are permitted.

    Location: ASH40 - A422 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10364

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    • 20296-01
    • Sociology of Law: Law and Bureaucracy
    • Kohler-Hausmann
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Sociology of Law: Law and Bureaucracy (20296). 3 units. Bureaucracy is a form of social organization fundamental to modern society. Law on the books becomes law in action largely through legal bureaucracies, whether it is through courts, administrative agencies, welfare offices or the compliance departments of private firms. In addition to exploring seminal texts on the concept of bureaucracy and organizations, this course will ask the following questions: Why is it important to study the organizational structure in which legal rules are interpreted and applied? How does the structure of bureaucracies—that is, the way in which they evaluate and adjudicate legal rights or claims—shape the precise way people experience the law?

    Instead of focusing on one specific site or subject matter, this class will investigate a set of conceptual and theoretical tools that can be used to study various legal sites. The readings may cover the following specific legal bureaucracies: criminal courts, police organizations, prisons, sexual harassment and anti-discrimination compliance offices of private firms, welfare offices, regulatory or administrative agencies, and law school admissions offices. Together we will explore how the sociology of law, bureaucracy and organizations can be used to ask penetrating questions about how legal rules come to have the specific pattern of use (or nonuse), enforcement (or nonenforcement), costs and benefits for the people and activities they address.

    Students will be expected to write frequent reaction papers to the readings and submit a final paper based on a short research inquiry into a specific legal organization of their choice. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. I. Kohler-Hausmann.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10487

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    • 20656-01
    • Taxation: Directed Research
    • Listokin
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Taxation: Directed Research (20656). 2 or 3 units. The instructor will supervise students who wish to write a paper about taxation. Credit hours depend upon the scope of the paper project. Paper required. Enrollment limited to six. Y. Listokin.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10401

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    • 20648-01
    • Transnational Corporations and Human Rights
    • Dhir
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Transnational Corporations and Human Rights (20648). 2 units. Apple’s use of child labor; Goldcorp's operations in Guatemala; the complicity of Dow Chemical/Union Carbide in the Bhopal chemical disaster; Shell’s involvement in the executions of activists protesting the company’s environmental and development policies in Nigeria. These are just a few examples of alleged corporate malfeasance that have emerged on the international stage.

    The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the debate concerning the accountability of transnational corporations that are complicit in rights-violating activities. At the international level, there has been a striking new strategy in the protection of human rights: a transition from focusing solely on rights-violations committed by governments to a detailed examination of transnational corporate conduct. Indeed, it has now become trite to say that particular corporations have directly or indirectly participated in violations of human rights.

    In order to address the fundamental question of whether corporations should in fact be socially responsible, the seminar will begin with an introduction to corporate theory. Students will then explore some of the key issues in the debate. Namely, whether transnational corporations can properly be included under the international law of state responsibility; mechanisms for self-regulation (e.g. voluntary corporate codes of conduct); the utility of the U.S. Alien Tort Claims Act; the advantages and disadvantages of U.N. initiatives (e.g. the work of the former U.N. Special Representative on Business and Human Rights); and the relevance of domestic corporate and securities law mechanisms (e.g. shareholder proposals and social disclosure).

    The course will provide a comparative analysis of the U.S. and Canadian experiences, in particular. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twenty. Also MGT 661a. A. Dhir.

    Note: No drops will be approved after the open add/drop period. Attendance at the first class meeting is required.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10356

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    • 20665-01
    • U.S. Foreign Policy and the Law
    • Sullivan
      Koh
      Gewirtz
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    U.S. Foreign Policy and the Law (20665). 3 units. This course will examine U.S. foreign policy decision-making, including the role of domestic and international law. It will cover a series of case studies, contemporary and historical, and focus on the perspective of those who make and implement U.S. foreign policy: How is policy developed? What constraints do policymakers face? How are intersecting issues of policy and law addressed and resolved? Grade will be based on class participation and a final examination or paper (to be negotiated with the instructors). Non-law students (graduate and undergraduate) may be admitted by permission of the instructors. Enrollment limited to thirty. Scheduled examination or paper option. J. Sullivan, P. Gewirtz, and H.H. Koh.

    Note: No drops will be permitted after the final day of the add/drop period. First-day class attendance is required.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10661
    Exam: 1/12/2015 at 2:00 PM SLB: 122
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20508-01
    • †Advanced Deals Workshop: Public Company M&A
    • Robinson
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:30 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • faculty permission
    • exam required
    Expand

    †Advanced Deals Workshop: Public Company M&A (20508). 3 units. This course will be an advanced deals workshop focusing on the practical and legal issues that corporate lawyers face in structuring and negotiating merger and acquisition transactions involving public companies, as well as planning and defending against hostile takeovers. Topics will include understanding the roles of corporate lawyers and other players in M&A transactions, structuring deals, drafting and negotiating merger agreements to allocate risk and protect the deal, designing and implementing corporate takeover defenses including litigation strategies, planning hostile takeovers, managing conflict transactions including squeeze-outs and leveraged buyouts, and responding to shareholder activists and hedge funds. Prerequisite: Business Organizations or equivalent. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to fourteen. Self-scheduled examination (answers only). E. S. Robinson.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a copy of their CV by the end of the pre-registration period on June 26. Listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of the student's YLS transcript to the instructor.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10419
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20007-01
    • Antitrust and Regulation Research Seminar
    • Klevorick
    • 3 or 4
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Antitrust and Regulation Research Seminar (20007). 3 or 4 units. Research and writing on current problems in antitrust and regulation. Topics to be arranged with the instructor. Prerequisite: the basic Antitrust course or its equivalent. Note: Students interested in enrolling in this course should submit topic statements to the professor. Paper required. Enrollment limited to six. Permission of the instructor required. A.K. Klevorick.

    Course Bidding Information: In addition to listing this course among their permission-of-the-instructor selections, students who are interested in taking the Antitrust and Regulation Research Seminar in Fall 2014 should upload to the bidding system by June 26 at 4:30 PM a brief statement indicating a specific topic they would like to explore and the courses they have taken that are related to antitrust and regulation. Prof. Klevorick will select students for the seminar based on their topic statements.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10397

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    • 20121-01
    • Comparative Constitutional Law: Seminar
    • Amar
      Calabresi
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Comparative Constitutional Law: Seminar (20121). 2 units. This seminar will provide a comparative perspective on American constitutional law by looking at analogous case law and institutions from other constitutional democracies including the U.K., Germany, France, Japan, India, Canada, South Africa, Australia, Indonesia, South Korea, Brazil, Italy, Israel, and the European Union. Topics will include amendment mechanisms, secession, judicial review, separation of powers, federalism, fundamental rights, equality, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, comparative procedure, property rights and economic liberties, entitlements to government aid, and guarantees of democracy. The course requirements are a ten-page take-home exam essay and a twenty-five page paper. Permission of the instructors required. Self-scheduled examination and paper required. A. R. Amar and S. G. Calabresi.

    Note: Students who are interested in this seminar only need to list this course among permission-of-instructor selections; there is no need otherwise to apply in advance but all interested students should plan to attend the first class meeting. The instructors will then decide who has permission to enroll.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10342
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20418-01
    • Experimentalism in Theory and Practice
    • Sabel
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Experimentalism in Theory and Practice (20418). 2 units. Since the 1970s the efforts of the activist state to provide services and establish regulations underpinning inclusive growth, social welfare and environmental improvement have been severely hampered by the shortcomings of the public bureaucracies charged with achieving these goals. The premise of this class is that, in response, a form of post-bureaucratic service provision and regulation is emerging, piecemeal and in the shadow of established institutions, in the United States, the European Union, and some transnational regimes. These post-bureaucratic regimes authorize “local” units—the frontline workers providing services or the district of regional authorities supervising them; the private actors under regulatory oversight—to exercise discretion in pursuing policy goals in particular contexts, provided that the local units report their results according to jointly agreed metrics and participate in peer reviews. This forward-looking or dynamic accountability encourages local experimentation while allowing for rapid correction of failure and the generalization of success. Governance of this kind is experimentalist in the sense of pragmatists like John Dewey because it systematically provokes doubt about its own assumptions and practices; it treats all solutions as incomplete and corrigible; and it produces an ongoing, reciprocal readjustment of ends and means through comparison of different approaches to advancing shared, general aims.The first term of this class will explore the theoretical foundations for these claims and illustrate their application through case studies of child welfare, problem-oriented policing and food safety in the United States, regulation of hazardous chemicals and GMOs in the European Union, and the Montreal Protocol for elimination of ozone-depleting substances. The concluding sessionsevaluate the claim that experimentalist institutions can be a key component in the renewal of the welfare state and representative democracy.

    See the spring-term description for further information. This course can be taken in both the fall and spring terms, or taken only in the fall term. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. C. F. Sabel.

    Note: Students are encouraged to take both terms but some may elect only to take the fall-term, theoretical half of the course. No new students will be admitted in the spring semester.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a CV and a one-paragraph statement of interest by the close of the fall pre-registration period on June 26.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10335

    Close
    • 20654-01
    • History of Political Economy
    • Grewal
    • Tue 7:00 PM-8:50 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    History of Political Economy (20654). 2 units. This course will consider the history of political economy as a history of economic and political discourses from the seventeenth to the twentieth century. Given this long span, it will obviously be highly selective in treating discursive and theoretical issues of major importance. The focus will be on three major themes: first, the transformation of the ancient theoretical vocabulary of polis and oikos into the modern vocabulary of civil society (or economy) and state; second, the emergence of the concept of the self-equilibrating economy in the eighteenth century, and subsequent controversies over its normative underpinnings; third, the rise and fall of classical political economy and its relation to its successor schools, nineteenth-century marginalism, and twenty-century welfare economics. Readings will consist mainly of original works by central figures in this historical tradition. Class participation is required. Paper required. Permission of the instructor required. Also PSLC 593a.D.S. Grewal.

    Prerequisites: There are no formal prerequisites for the course, but it is only appropriate for students with a background in political theory and exposure to basic economics.
    Note: This course will follow the Graduate School calendar.

    Note: Attendance at first class session is mandatory.

    Location: HGS - 117 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10383

    Close
    • 20653-01
    • Introduction to Legal Scholarship
    • Eskridge
      Meares
    • Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Tue 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • exam required
    Expand

    Introduction to Legal Scholarship (20653). 3 units. This seminar will focus on legal scholarship, including some older classics as well as newer work that we consider cutting-edge. Books, articles, and papers will cover a wide range of subject areas and methodologies in both public law and private law. For more recent "classics," we shall arrange for the authors to join the discussions. Permission of the instructors required. W.N. Eskridge, Jr., and T. Meares.

    Course Bidding: All first-year students in the Ph.D. in Law program are admitted to this seminar, which is a requirement of their program. In addition, the instructors welcome applications from joint-degree and first-year JSD students. Applications briefly outlining the student's interest in, and preparation for, this course should be sent by e-mail to both Professor Eskridge and Professor Meares by August 1, 2014, and final decisions will be made shortly thereafter.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Wed)
    SLB - 108 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10365
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20232-01
    • Justice in Taxation
    • Alstott
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Justice in Taxation (20232). 2 units. In this seminar, we will consider how taxation, understood broadly, might advance alternative notions of justice, ranging from utilitarian to libertarian to egalitarian. Topics include progressive taxation, income and wealth taxation, the consumption tax, taxation of the family, retirement, and the working poor. Students will write a seminar paper. Students may, conditional on the instructor's approval of the topic, write a paper that will fulfill the Substantial Paper or Supervised Analytic Writing paper. Paper required. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. A.L. Alstott.

    Prerequisites: Students must meet two prerequisites: (1) Federal Income Taxation; (2) Justice (taught from Bruce Ackerman at Yale Law School) or equivalent introductory course on theories of distributive justice. This prerequisite can be met by watching the lectures for the Harvard undergraduate course, Justice (taught by Michael Sandel), available without charge on edX.org.

    Note: This seminar is a yearlong enterprise. We will meet once per week for roughly four weeks in the fall. We will then adjourn so that students can meet with the instructor individually to discuss their papers. We will reconvene in the second half of the spring term for student paper presentations. The course will only appear on the student's fall-term transcript record.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the instructor selections, students should also submit a one- to two-page statement of interest, outlining one or more interests or possible paper topics by June 26 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10341

    Close
    • 20660-01
    • Legitimacy: Directed Research
    • Tyler
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Legitimacy: Directed Research (20660). 1 to 3 units. Reading for research on the legitimacy of law and legal institutions. Paper required. Permission of the instructor required. T. Tyler.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a one-paragraph statement of interest on a proposed paper topic by June 26 at 4:30 p.m.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10431

    Close
    • 20304-01
    • Public Health in the Shadow of the First Amendment
    • Kapczynski
      Post
    • Mon 7:10 PM-10:00 PM
      Tue 7:10 PM-10:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Public Health in the Shadow of the First Amendment (20304). 1 unit, credit/fail. The regulation of food, medicines, and tobacco all rely crucially today on the regulation of speech, for example through behavioral marketing, disclosures, and restrictions on certain modes of commercial promotion. First Amendment doctrine has recently changed in significant ways, bringing it into potentially deep tension with such measures. For example, commercial speech doctrine has been used to invalidate FDA restrictions on off-label marketing of drugs, to prevent graphic warnings on cigarette packages, and to challenge calorie disclosures in restaurants.

    In addition, new and important questions about the limits of a legislature’s ability to mandate or forbid certain physician speech are emerging. For example, should the First Amendment protect doctors from requirements that they provide patients with ultrasounds or medically unproven information in the abortion context, or mental health providers from restrictions on conducting reparative therapy for gay teens? In cases such as these, courts and legislatures are also increasingly required to adjudicate questions of scientific merit. Many recent examples suggest reason for concern about the results.

    Neither courts nor scholars have developed a consistent and coherent approach to these different areas. Experts in First Amendment law are rarely in a position to fully articulate the health consequences of these cases, and health experts rarely have the literacy in free speech law required to navigate these issues. In this one-credit course, we will review important recent cases at the intersection of law, public health, and medicine. In particular, we will focus on the intersection between First Amendment doctrine and (1) food and drug regulation, (2) behavioral marketing in the context of obesity, tobacco, and food policy, the (3) regulation of professional conduct. Enrollment limited to ten. Permission of the instructors required. A. Kapczynski and R.C. Post.

    We are convening the course in anticipation of a major conference on these issues, hosted by the Yale Law School, the Yale School of Medicine, and the Yale School of Public Health, on October 17-18. Students will be expected to attend the conference, and our seminar sessions. If they wish to receive 1 unit of credit, students will also be expected to attend one or two sessions after the conference, and submit short paper proposals on topics relevant to our discussions. Many of our readings will be drawn from the packet available here.

    How to Apply: The course is open to participation from the law school, medical school, or public health school, but limited to a total of ten students. Students who would like to join the course should send a statement of background and interest to amy.kapczynski@yale.edu by Monday, September 9 at 9 a.m. Please also note whether you can attend all three of the scheduled sessions (dates below), and the conference, and whether you intend to do the course for credit. (We cannot offer credit in schools outside of the law school, but are happy to have students from Medicine and Public Health with relevant interests and background, with the understanding that the bulk of our reading will be case law.)

    Meeting Dates
    (All sessions will be in Room 111, Yale Law School)

    Tues, Sept. 9, 7pm-10pm
    Mon, Oct. 6, 7pm-10pm
    Mon, Oct. 13, 7pm-10pm
    Conference dates: Oct 17, 1:30pm – 5:15pm, Oct 18, 9am – 5:15pm
    Fourth evening session, date TBD, probably Nov. 3 or 4.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15592

    Close
    • 20203-01
    • Race and the Law: African-Americans and Criminal Justice
    • Forman
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Race and the Law: African-Americans and Criminal Justice (20203). 3 units. Since the early 1970s, the criminal justice system in the United States has expanded dramatically. The country has adopted an array of increasingly tough approaches to crime, including aggressive street-level policing, longer sentences, and a range of collateral consequences for criminal convictions. As a result, there are currently 2.2 million persons in prisons and jails and seven million under some form of correctional supervision. The impact on African Americans has been especially profound: In many of our nation's cities, nearly one-half of young black men are in the criminal justice system.

    This seminar will focus on the tough-on-crime era’s historical roots. We will also examine the impact on these policies, especially on African-American communities. We will pay particular attention to the role of African-Americans, not only as crime victims and defendants but also as actors—e.g., voters, intellectuals, policy-makers, activists, prosecutors, probation and police officers—who make and influence criminal justice policy.

    The assigned reading will be substantial and will come from a wide variety of sources, including history, sociology, political science, criminology, and law. Examples of the sort of material being considered include: Khalil Muhammad, The Condemnation of Blackness; Douglas Blackmon, Slavery By Another Name; Geoff Ward, The Black Child-Savers; Nicholas Johnson, Negroes and the Gun; Marie Gottschalk, The Prison and the Gallows; Randall Kennedy, Race, Crime, and the Law; Angela Davis, Arbitrary Justice; Ellis Cose, The Darden Dilemma; Lisa Miller, The Perils of Federalism; David Garland, Peculiar Institution; Alice Goffman, On the Run; David Kennedy, Don’t Shoot; and articles by Ronald Weitzer, Paul Butler, and Michael Fortner.

    In lieu of an examination, students will write weekly reading response papers and a final paper. Substantial Paper credit is available. Supervised Analytic Writing credit is not available. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of the instructor required. Also AFAM 625a. J. Forman, Jr.

    Course bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission of the instructor selections, students should submit a brief statement of interest and a CV June 26 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note:Attendance at the first class meeting is required.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10369

    Close
    • 20662-01
    • Rethinking Sovereignty: Human Rights and Globalization
    • Benhabib
    • Wed 1:30 PM-3:20 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Rethinking Sovereignty: Human Rights and Globalization (20662). 3 units. The crises of sovereignty and the end of sovereignty have been discussed in law, political science, and philosophy. Post-nationalist, cosmopolitan, as well as neo-liberal critics of sovereignty abound. This course will discuss alternative models of sovereignty, ranging from democratic iterations to popular constitutionalism, and will consider the implications of these models for the definition and enforcement of rights. Readings will include Hobbes, Kant, Schmitt, Arendt, Kelsen, Habermas, Waldron, Walker and Benveniste. Paper required. Enrollment limited and permission of the instructor required. Also PHIL 656a/PLSC 605a/PLSC 292a. S. Benhabib.

    Location: RKZ - 202 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10441

    Close
    • 20500-01
    • [The] Role of a Judge in a Democratic Society
    • Barak
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    [The] Role of a Judge in a Democratic Society (20500). 2 units. This research seminar will consider—on a comparative law basis— the role of judges, mainly Supreme Court or Constitutional Court judges in a democracy. It will concentrate on their role in bridging the gap between law and society and in protecting the constitution and democracy. The class will consider if those are proper roles for judges. Are there more important roles? How do we understand democracy in this respect? The topics will also include analyzing proper tools used by judges to fulfill their role. Subjects that may be researched are: interpretation; gap-filling; and the development of common law. Other topics that are relevant: balancing; questions of non-justiciability; and standing. One may also consider in this respect the place of jurisprudence in performing the role of a judge. Another subject is the way the judgment is articulated and drafted, including the question of minimalism and rhetoric. Other topics may relate to the role of the judge and his or her interrelationship with the legislative branch (dialogue; judicial review) and with the executive branch (deference). Also included are topics on the role of a judge in a democracy fighting terror. Students will meet individually with the professor during the term to discuss their papers. Hours to be arranged. Paper required. A. Barak.

    Course Bidding: Students should submit statements of interest by June 26, 2014, at 4:30 p.m.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10347

    Close
    • 20568-01
    • Sexuality, Gender, Health, and Human Rights
    • Miller
    • Thu 9:25 AM-11:15 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Sexuality, Health and Human Rights (20568). 2 units. This course will explore the application of human rights perspectives and practices to issues in regard to sexuality and health. Through reading, interactive discussion, paper presentation, and occaional outside speakers, students will learn the tools and implications of applying rights to a range of sexuality and health-related topics. The overal goal is twofold: to engage students in the world of global sexual health and rights policy making as a field of social justice and public health action; and to introduce them to conceptual tools that can inform advocacy and policy formation and evaluation. Class participation, short reaction papers, and a final paper required. This course will follow the calendar of the Graduate School. Enrollment limited. Also GLBL 529a/CDE 585a. A.M. Miller.

    Location: WLH - 001 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 11596

    Close
    • 20248-01
    • Theories of Distributive Justice
    • Roemer
    • Wed 9:25 AM-11:15 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Theories of Distributive Justice (20248). 2 units. In Fall 2014, a good portion of this seminar will be spent reading and discussing Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century (Harvard Univ. Press, 2014), the most important book on income distribution in some years. The course will then survey the main theories of distributive justice proposed by economists and political philosophers since 1950, critiquing each theory from both the economic and philosophical perspective. Topics covered include Arrow's impossibility theorem and its resolution; axiomatic bargaining theory (J. Nash and followers); utilitarianism according to J. Harsanyi and others; egalitarianism according to J. Rawls and A. Sen; the veil of ignorance as a thought experiment; neo-Lockeanism according to R. Nozick; resource egalitarianism according to R. Dworkin; and equality of opportunity according to R. Arneson, G.A. Cohen, and J. Roemer. Besides Piketty's book, there will be readings posted on the class website. Some background at the level of intermediate micro-economics is required. An appropriate prerequisite is PLSC 517. There will be some problem sets and short essays. Permission of the instructor required. Also PLSC 595a/ECON 791a. J. Roemer.

    Note: This course will meet according to the calendar of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

    Location: RKZ - 202 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10827

    Close
    • 20261-01
    • [The] United States and Cuba: Advanced Research and Writing
    • Stith
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    [The] United States and Cuba: Advanced Research and Writing (20261). 2 units. Students may not enroll in this course only if they have completed the two-credit, ungraded research seminar The United States and Cuba, taught in Spring 2014. Students in this advanced seminar will continue their previous research or begin a new area of research with the instructor’s permission. Papers must be completed by the end of the term unless the instructor provides written permission for an extension. All enrolled students will also help develop, prepare, and participate in the conference on U.S.-Cuban relations that is tentatively planned for late January 2015. Paper required. Permission of the instructor required. K. Stith.

    Note: This class will meet either on Monday or Tuesday evening; the exact time will be announced after Professor Stith has conferred with the accepted students.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10485

    Close
    • 20236-01
    • Working with Intellectual Property: Patents and Trade Secrets
    • Cundiff
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Working with Intellectual Property: Patents and Trade Secrets (20236). 2 units. This course will examine current issues in intellectual property by focusing on the activities of lawyers who litigate and advise on patent and other intellectual property cases. Casebooks present, debate and evaluate the conclusions courts have reached in significant cases. This course will discuss how lawyers develop the evidence and arguments that lead decision makers to reach their conclusions and will examine working arrangements and disputes that frequently do not make their way into court at all. The course will examine documents such as various kinds of licensing agreements, deposition transcripts, expert reports, briefs, and other "building blocks" underlying reported decisions, as well as applicable statutory and case law authority. Guest lecturers who have had significant influence in shaping intellectual property law will participate in a number of our classes; past visitors have included lawyers who have argued leading cases, a Judge from the Federal Circuit, an author of leading intellectual property treatises, and lawyers representing major industry and policy organizations in the intellectual property arena. Instead of an exam, students will prepare and present reaction papers and problem-solving documents (e.g., protest letters, argument/negotiation outlines, proposed orders for relief, and settlement proposals) throughout the semester individually and as part of a group. Prior experience in intellectual property law is helpful but not required. This course is not a survey of intellectual property law issues. It complements other intellectual property courses offered by the School. Instructor will be able to accept a limited number of papers in satisfaction of the Substantial Paper requirement. Permission of the instructor required. V.A. Cundiff.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among your permission-of-the-instructor selections, please submit a brief statement of interest describing any experience you may have had with intellectual property law and a description of the legal writing you have done or are planning to pursue by 4:30 p.m. on June 25. This information will be used to tailor the course to the participants.

    Location: ASH40 - A420 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10352

    Close
    • 20435-01
    • Advanced Community and Economic Development Clinic
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
      Viswanathan
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Community and Economic Development Clinic (20435). 1 to 4 units, credit/fail with a graded option. Open only to students who have completed the Community and Economic Development Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar, C. F. Muckenfuss III, M. Viswanathan.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; or SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10484

    Close
    • 20603-01
    • Advanced Criminal Justice Clinic
    • Doherty
    • 2 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Criminal Justice Clinic (20603). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. F. Doherty, S.O. Bruce III, and T. Ullmann.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10360

    Close
    • 20382-01
    • Advanced Immigration Legal Services
    • Lucht
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Immigration Legal Services (20382). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail. Only open to students who have taken Immigration Legal Services. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to ten. C.L. Lucht.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship, Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (New Haven Corp Counsel only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10403

    Close
    • 20574-01
    • Advanced Iraqi Refugee Assistance Project
    • Heller
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Iraqi Refugee Assistance Project (20574). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Iraqi Refugee Assistance Project. Permission of the instructor required. R. Heller.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10389

    Close
    • 20485-01
    • Advanced Legal Services for Immigrant Communities
    • Lucht
      Wizner
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Services for Immigrant Communities (20485). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail. Open only to students who have taken Legal Services for Immigrant Communities. Permission of the instructors required. C.L. Lucht and S. Wizner.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10402

    Close
    • 20476-01
    • †Advanced Supreme Court Advocacy
    • Greenhouse
      Balkin
      Messing
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Supreme Court Advocacy (20476). 4 units (2 fall, 2 spring). Open only to students who have completed Supreme Court Advocacy. Permission of the instructors required. L. Greenhouse, N. Messing, A. Pincus, C. Rothfeld, and J.M. Balkin.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10382

    Close
    • 20607-01
    • Advanced Transnational Development Clinic
    • Ahmad
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Transnational Development Clinic (20607). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail. Open only to students who have completed the Transnational Development Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. M. Ahmad.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10339

    Close
    • 20327-01
    • Advanced Advocacy for Children and Youth
    • Lucht
      Swanson
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Advocacy for Children and Youth (20327). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. Open only to students who have completed Advocacy for Children and Youth. Permission of the instructor required. C. Lucht and I. Swanson.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10404

    Close
    • 20477-01
    • Advanced Landlord/Tenant Legal Services
    • Pottenger
    • Thu 12:40 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Landlord/Tenant Legal Services (20477). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail. Only open to students who have taken Landlord/Tenant Legal Services in a previous semester. Permission of the instructors required. F.X. Dineen and J.L. Pottenger, Jr.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; or SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Location: SLB - 113 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10413

    Close
    • 20479-01
    • Advanced Education Adequacy Project
    • Rosen
      Knopp
      Smith
      Cantwell
      Bannigan
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Education Adequacy Project (20479). 1 to 3 units. Permission of the instructors required. D. Rosen, M. Bannigan, H. Cantwell, A. Knopp, and H. Smith.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 11595

    Close
    • 20651-01
    • Advanced Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic
    • Forman
      Shaffer
      Gohara
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic (20651). 1 to 3 units, graded or credit/fail. Open only to students who were enrolled in the School to Prison Pipeline project or the basic Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic. This clinic is only open to J.D. students. Permission of the instructors required. J. Forman, M. Gohara, and E. Shaffer.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Location: SLB - 108 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10370

    Close
    • 20605-01
    • Advanced Ethics Bureau
    • Fox
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Ethics Bureau (20605). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail with a graded option. This course is for students who have already taken either Ethics Bureau at Yale or the instructor’s course, Traversing the Ethical Minefield, and who wish to earn one to three units by contributing further to the work of the Bureau. †Students may satisfy the professional skills requirement through this course only if they receive 2 or more units. Enrollment limited to ten to twelve. Permission of the instructor required. L. Fox.

    Course Selection: Open only to students who have completed the basic Ethics Bureau at Yale clinic.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10372

    Close
    • 20516-01
    • Advanced San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project
    • Gerken
      Dawson
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced SFALP (20516). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. Open only to those students who have completed Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project. Permission of the instructors required. H. Gerken and J. Dawson.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10377

    Close
    • 20488-01
    • Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic
    • Wishnie
      Hallett
      Ahmad
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic (20488). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. M. Ahmad, N. Hallett, and M.J. Wishnie.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10435

    Close
    • 20511-01
    • †Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic
    • Silk
      Metcalf
      Kwon
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3 or 4
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (20511). 3 or 4 units. Open only to students who have completed the Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. J.J. Silk, H.R. Metcalf, and S. Kwon.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10427

    Close
    • 20595-01
    • Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic
    • Wishnie
      Middleton
      Li
    • 1 or 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic (20595). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Veterans Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M. Wishnie, B. Li, and M. Middleton.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10438

    Close
    • 20575-01
    • †Appellate Advocacy: The Art of Appellate Practice and Procedure
    • Schaller
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Appellate Advocacy: The Art of Appellate Practice and Procedure (20575). 3 units. This course will provide an introduction to appellate practice and procedure, designed to teach students the basic substantive knowledge and skills needed to advocate effectively on behalf of a client in an appellate court. The course begins with entry of judgment in the trial court and proceeds through preliminary motion practice, briefing and oral argument. Connecticut’s appellate rules will be applied. Students will act as lawyers in a simulated appellate case based on a trial record and transcript, as well as preside during class in various roles including roles of trial judge and appellate judge. In addition to the basic instruction and analysis of selected opinions, invited practitioners and judges will address appellate advocacy and legal analysis. Students will be required to submit a two-page reflection paper. Enrollment limited to sixteen. Permission of the instructor required. B.R. Schaller.

    Note: Accepted students will be notified following the early course selection period and will be asked to confirm their commitment to the course. First-day attendance is required. No drops will be permitted after the first class meeting.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10423

    Close
    • 20251-01
    • †Capital Punishment Clinic
    • Bright
      Parrent
      Sanneh
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Capital Punishment Clinic (20251). 6 units (3 fall, 3 spring), credit/fail in the fall term with the option of graded credit in the spring. Students will spend two to three weeks in August at the Southern Center for Human Rights in Atlanta, the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, or the Capital Habeas Unit of the Federal Community Defender Office of Philadelphia, where they will meet attorneys, investigators and mitigation specialists working on capital cases and become part of a team representing people facing the death penalty. They will work on cases, which may include interviews with clients or witnesses, depending upon what is happening in the case at the time, as well as legal research, analysis and writing. Students will continue their work over two semesters upon return to the Law School. Students will complete a substantial writing assignment, such as a portion of a motion, brief, or memorandum of law. This course requires participation for both the fall and spring terms. The course is limited to students who have taken Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, and Disadvantage, or intend to take it in Spring 2015. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to six. S.B. Bright, A. Parrent, and S. Sanneh.

    Course bidding information: List this clinic among your experiential course selections. In addition, please describe briefly why you would like to take the clinic; whether you will have sufficient time to devote to the clinic; past work experience (including summer work between years of law school); and what you expect or would like to do upon graduation. Please confirm that you can spend 2-3 weeks in Montgomery or Atlanta if you are accepted into the clinic. Statements must be directly sent to Professor Bright (stephen.bright@yale.edu) by June 26, 2014, at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    SLB - 108 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10350

    Close
    • 20544-01
    • †Civil Litigation Practice.
    • Gold
      Acee
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:30 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Civil Litigation Practice. (20544). 3 units. The course will begin with an overview of pleadings, discovery, and the anatomy of a civil lawsuit. It will then proceed to isolate and develop the skills of oral advocacy, through extensive learning-by-doing exercises, including conducting depositions; performing opening statements and closing arguments; conducting direct and cross examinations of courtroom witnesses; and participating in a full-day jury trial. The course will also include preparation of pleadings and analysis of and critical thinking regarding the elements, underpinnings, and efficacy of the litigation process. The course materials include selected readings and three complete case files published by the National Institute of Trial Advocacy. A participatory session on mediation, under the guidance of an experienced mediator, is included. Prerequisite: Trial Practice. Enrollment limited to twelve. E.K. Acee and F. Gold.

    Note: First-day attendance is required. No drops will be permitted after the first class meeting.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10378

    Close
    • 20384-01
    • †Corporate Crisis Management
    • Trevino
      Coleman
      Wiseman
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Corporate Crisis Management (20384). 2 units, credit/fail. As a result of unplanned for (or badly planned for) negative events, companies increasingly find themselves as targets of aggressive legal action, media coverage and regulatory pressure. This is particularly the case for large or name-brand companies. Recent examples include the GM and Toyota recalls, the Carnival Triumph cruise, Target’s data breach and JPMorgan’s London Whale. The scale can range from an existential threat, such as BP’s oil spill, to a more minor reputational crisis, such as Lululemon’s recall.

    One of the key challenges presented by these developments is that they do not arise from the usual interactions that characterize “normal” business. Instead, companies must organize and act across traditional hierarchies and areas of expertise and many times face antagonistic, unexpected tactics designed for maximal visibility and shock effect, potentially to force industry-wide change. In advising clients in these situations, lawyers must coordinate business concerns, legal issues, stakeholder concerns and regulatory matters, as well as plan for both expected and unexpected outcomes.

    This class is based on experiential learning: a rich set of case studies and crisis simulation exercises balance the theoretical and legal frameworks and will help participants to improve their strategic thinking as well as team management and communication skills in high-stress situations. Enrollment limited to sixteen. Permission of the instructors required. H. Coleman, M. Trevino, and M. Wiseman.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10490

    Close
    • 20519-01
    • *†Criminal Justice Clinic
    • Doherty
      Ullmann
      Bruce
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Criminal Justice Clinic (20519) and Fieldwork (20641). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option, for each part (4 units total). The clinic and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. Students represent defendants in criminal cases in the Geographical Area #23 courthouse (the "GA") on Elm Street in New Haven. Students handle all aspects of their clients' cases under the direct supervision of clinical faculty. Students learn how to build relationships with clients, investigate and develop their cases, construct persuasive case theories, negotiate with opposing counsel, prepare motions and briefs, and advocate for clients in court. Students also explore the legal framework governing the representation of clients in criminal cases, including the rules of professional responsibility. Throughout, students are encouraged to think critically about the operation of the criminal justice system and to reflect on opportunities for reform. Because of the frequency of court appearances, students must keep two mornings a week (Monday--Thursday, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.) free from other obligations. Students must also return to the Law School in time to participate in an August 28 and 29, 2014, orientation program intended to prepare them for criminal practice. Enrollment limited. F. Doherty, S.O. Bruce III, and T. Ullmann.

    Course Bidding: In addition to selecting this course among the experiential course listings, you should upload to the bidding system a statement of interest and CV by the close of early registration on June 26, 2014 at 4:30 p.m. Applying to this clinic constitutes permission for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of your Law transcript to the instructors.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10358

    Close
    • 20641-01
    • †Criminal Justice Fieldwork
    • Doherty
      Ullmann
      Bruce
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Criminal Justice Clinic: Fieldwork (20641). 2 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. Students must be enrolled simultaneously in the seminar and fieldwork sections of this clinic. F.M. Doherty, S.O. Bruce III, and T. Ullmann.

    Course Bidding: Students who bid on the seminar section of this clinic and who are accepted will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing tudent, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10359

    Close
    • 20403-01
    • *†Education Adequacy Project
    • Rosen
      Knopp
      Smith
      Cantwell
      Bannigan
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Education Adequacy Project (20403). 3 units. The Education Adequacy Project (EAP) provides a unique opportunity for students to participate in and help lead institutional reform litigation. The only clinic of its kind in the nation, EAP pursues a single complex lawsuit to ensure the State of Connecticut provides all Connecticut children with adequate and equitable educations.
    Students work with attorneys at Debevoise & Plimpton as well as local counsel in an integrated trial team. Students play a significant role in determining the case's litigation strategy. EAP members pursue a variety of projects including education policy research, legal writing, legal research and other tasks essential to litigation. Class time is devoted to litigation strategy and discussion with supervising attorneys; training in litigation skills; and internal clinic logistics. Permission of the instructors required. H. Cantwell, D.N. Rosen, H. Smith, A.A. Knopp, and M. Bannigan.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students should also submit a resume and a statement of interest (no longer than two pages, double spaced) to the eap@panlists.yale.edu by 4:30 p.m. on June 26.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; or SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Location: ASH40 - A420 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10421

    Close
    • 20311-01
    • *†Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic
    • Forman
      Shaffer
      Gohara
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic (20311). 4 units, credit/fail. In the Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic (EOJJC), students represent children in expulsion hearings and in general educational advocacy in the New Haven School District. The initial focus is representation in the expulsion hearing, an administrative hearing before a hearing officer appointed by the school board. Students cross examine the school’s witnesses, present evidence, call defense witnesses, and make closing arguments.

    After the hearing, if a client has been expelled, students put a plan in place to support the client during expulsion. Students focus on providing additional educational opportunities through tutoring, mentoring, community activities, and other creative solutions to ensure our clients continue to progress even while expelled. Providing these services also serves as mitigation in delinquency proceedings. Students continue to advocate for our clients for the entire period of expulsion. In some cases, students also advocate for the special educational needs of our clients. This advocacy involves attending meetings with the school, encouraging parents to request special education evaluations, and ensuring our clients are receiving the services required by their Individualized Education Programs.

    For the first half of the semester, class time is devoted to effective client-centered lawyering when representing adolescents, including training on investigation, developing a theory of the case, and trial skills. Additional class sessions address topics such as: (1) race and the juvenile justice system, and (2) the connection between individual representation and systemic reform. This clinic is open only to J.D. students. Permission of the instructors required. J. Forman, M. Gohara, and E. Shaffer.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, interested students should submit a statement briefly describing why they would like to take the clinic; what, if any, experience or interest they may have with regard to classroom teaching, school discipline, juvenile justice, or criminal justice; and what they expect or would like to do after graduation. Students should include their name and year in law school. The statements should be uploaded by June 26, 4:30 p.m. Students will be selected for the class upon review of their submissions. Listing this course and submitting materials constitutes authorization for the Registrar’s Office to release a copy of the student’s YLS transcript to the instructor.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and either of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; or SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Location: SLB - 108 (Wed)
    SLB - 108 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10368

    Close
    • 20316-01
    • *†Environmental Protection Clinic
    • Galperin
      Henger
      Suatoni
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Environmental Protection Clinic (20316). 3 units, credit/fail. A clinical seminar in which students will be engaged with actual environmental law or policy problems on behalf of client organizations (environmental groups, government agencies, international bodies, etc.). The class will meet weekly, and students will work ten to twelve hours per week in interdisciplinary groups (with students from the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and other departments or schools at Yale) on projects with a specific legal or policy product (e.g., draft legislation or regulations, hearing testimony, analytic studies, policy proposals) to be produced by the end of the term. Students may propose projects and client organizations, subject to approval by the instructor. Enrollment limited to thirty. Also F&ES 970a. J. Galperin, A. Clements, and L. Suatoni.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10374

    Close
    • 20604-01
    • *†Ethics Bureau at Yale: Pro Bono Professional Responsibility Advice
    • Fox
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Ethics Bureau at Yale: Pro Bono Professional Responsibility Advice (20604). 3 units. Lawyers' need for ethics advice, consultation and opinions is not limited to those who can pay. Impecunious clients and the lawyers who serve them are in need of ethics counseling and legal opinions on a regular basis. For example, Yale law students provided essential help in preparing an amicus brief in Holland v. Florida, a Supreme Court case from the 2009 Term that resulted in a victory for the petitioner and an extensive citation to the amicus brief in the majority opinion. The Ethics Bureau provides these essential services for those who cannot retain paying counsel. The work of the Bureau will consist of three major components. First, the Bureau will provide ethics counseling for pro bono organizations such as legal services offices and public defenders. Second, the Bureau will prepare standard-of-care opinions relating to the conduct of lawyers that are needed in cases alleging ineffective assistance of counsel and other challenges to lawyer conduct, cases in which the clients are impecunious and otherwise cannot secure expert assistance. Third, from time to time, the Yale Ethics Bureau will provide assistance to amici curiae, typically bar associations or ethics professors, on questions of professional responsibility in cases in which such issues are front and center. It did so in a United States Supreme Court case, Maples v. Allen, argued in the 2010 Term, decided in early 2012, citing the amicus brief of the clinic. The students working at the Bureau will meet for class two hours per week and will be expected to put in approximately ten hours on Bureau projects each week. The classroom work will not only explore the ethical minefield, but also consider the role of expert witnesses in the litigation process, its appropriateness and the procedural issues thereby raised. No prerequisites. Preference given to prior Ethics Bureau enrollees and students who previously took the instructor’s ethics class. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of the instructor required. L. Fox.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among the permission of the instructor preferences, interested students should also submit a short statement of interest by the close of the bidding period on June 26 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10371

    Close
    • 20004-01
    • †Landlord/Tenant Legal Services
    • Pottenger
      Dineen
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Landlord/Tenant Legal Services (20004). 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical seminar will provide legal assistance, under the supervision of clinical faculty, to low-income tenants facing eviction in the New Haven Housing Court. Topics to be covered in discussions and class materials will include the substantive law of landlord-tenant relations, the Connecticut Rules of Practice and Procedure, ethical issues arising in the representation of clients, social and housing policy, and the development of lawyering skills, particularly in interviewing, litigation, negotiation, and mediation. Weekly class sessions and supervision sessions, plus eight to twelve hours per week of casework. Enrollment limited to eight. F.X. Dineen and J.L. Pottenger, Jr.

    Note: Attendance at first class meeting is required. A no-drop policy will apply thereafter.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and anyof the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; or SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Location: SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10410

    Close
    • 20107-01
    • †Legal Assistance
    • Dineen
    • Fri 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Legal Assistance (20107). 3 units, credit/fail. A clinical seminar, using classroom, field work, and simulation experiences in the general area of legal assistance for the poor. Students will work eight to twelve hours per week in a local legal aid office and will attend weekly classroom sessions. The seminar will be practice-oriented, moving from developing solutions for specific client problems to general discussions of landlord-tenant, consumer, domestic relations, welfare, and other legal subjects of special concern to the urban poor, as well as issues of broader social policy. The seminar will also focus on the development of professional responsibility and lawyering skills, such as interviewing, negotiating, counseling, drafting, and litigation. A few placements for criminal defense work in state court will also be available. Enrollment limited to eight. F.X. Dineen.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic andany of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10357

    Close
    • 20352-01
    • †Legislative Advocacy Clinic
    • Pottenger
      Knopp
      Geballe
      Scalettar
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Legislative Advocacy Clinic (20352). 3 units, credit/fail. This clinical seminar will give students an opportunity to participate in the state legislative and policy-making processes by advancing – and defending – the interests of a Connecticut public interest organization of their choice. Clinic students may select their projects from a range of options supplied by the faculty, or they may approach the clinic with an organization/cause already in mind. Recently, students in the clinic have focused on public education, juvenile justice, tax policy, and women’s health. One of our long-time clients (Connecticut Voices for Children) is a key player on a broad spectrum of policy issues affecting Connecticut families. The clinic’s work includes both affirmative legislative initiatives and defensive efforts to respond to proposed legislation deemed inimical to the interests of its clients. Issues of ethics and professional responsibility for lawyers working in the legislative arena will be an important focus of this clinic. In the fall term, students will develop policy proposals, participate in training sessions led by some of Connecticut’s most experienced lobbyists, meet with state legislators, and work with their client organizations to identify upcoming legislative issues. Once issues have been chosen for action, students will research the subject, work in coalition with other organizations, prepare and present “white papers,” and meet with legislators. In the spring, students will meet with legislators to get their bills introduced, develop oral and written testimony in support thereof, identify other witnesses, shepherd their bills through the committee process, and work to get them adopted. During the legislative session, students will also monitor other proposed legislation that might affect the clinic’s clients. To allow all students to participate in both the training/issue development and direct action aspects of the clinic’s work, priority will be given to students who commence their participation in the Fall term. Enrollment limited to twelve. J.L. Pottenger, Jr., S.D. Geballe, A.A. Knopp, and E. Scalettar.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is required. A no-drop policy will apply. Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Location: SLB - 112 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10412

    Close
    • 20632-01
    • †Liman Public Interest Project
    • Resnik
      Metcalf
      Quattlebaum
      Kalb
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Liman Public Interest Project (20632). 2 units, credit/fail. This course will provide students with the opportunity to work on public interest law projects. Subjects have ranged from immigration and criminal justice to poverty law. This year the focus will continue to be on facets of incarceration; ongoing and new projects involve examining where men and women are located in the federal prison system so as to understand the relative opportunities for education and other programs, and thinking more generally about the role of gender in incarceration; studying how prisons use and regulate long-term isolation, both in terms of policies and practices; and considering regional differences in how directors of state prison systems address and manage prisons. Prior projects have included analyzing rules in all fifty states on visiting prisoners and proposing revised policies; exploring how immigration status affects parental interactions with state child welfare agencies; developing educational materials for incarcerated and recently-released people on parental rights and obligations; and researching how state and local tax regimes treat diapers so as to lower costs for low-income families and service providers. Students work in teams and meet regularly with supervisors, and, with permission, students may elect to write a related Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper for additional graded credit. The projects sometimes continue for more than one semester and have, on occasion, resulted in published articles. Permission of the instructors required. J. Resnik, J. Kalb, H.R. Metcalf, and M. Quattlebaum.

    Course bidding: In additional to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should submit a short statement of interest (no more than 250 words) and a CV by 4:30 p.m. on June 26. Selecting this course during pre-registration constitutes authorization for the Registrar’s Office to release a copy of a student’s YLS transcript to the instructors.

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10417

    Close
    • 20498-01
    • Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project
    • Gerken
      Dawson
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (20498). 1 unit, with the option of additional units. This course will introduce students to local government lawyering. Working directly with attorneys from the Affirmative Litigation Task Force in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, students will have an opportunity to brainstorm about potential projects, research the most promising ideas for lawsuits, assist in filing a case, or help litigate one already underway. The course will address both theoretical issues (What roles should cities play in our democracy? Can cities further the public interest through litigation?) and practical ones (city-state relations, standing issues). The first part of the course will acquaint students with broader legal and policy issues associated with affirmative litigation. The students will then break into independent working groups organized by subject area; the working groups will be designed to accommodate student interests and preferences. Each working group will either develop and propose a potential lawsuit, or assist in one of the City’s ongoing affirmative litigation cases. Students joining in the fall are expected to make a one-year commitment (both fall and spring semesters). In addition, students enrolling in this course for the first time in Fall 2014 must complete their one-year commitment in the course to receive professional responsibility credit. Permission of the instructors required. H. Gerken and J. Dawson.

    Course Selection: List this clinic among the experiential course selections. If you would like to enroll, please send one paragraph on why you are interested in local government work as well as your resume to Yael Shavit (yael.shavit@yale.edu) by June 26, 2014, 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Location: SLB - 122 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10376

    Close
    • 20188-01
    • *†Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic
    • Silk
      Metcalf
      Kwon
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (20188). 4 units, credit/fail. Students will work on a variety of human rights projects, generally in support of advocacy efforts of human rights organizations. Projects are designed to give students practical experience with the range of activities in which lawyers engage to promote respect for human rights; to help students build the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective human rights lawyers; and to integrate the theory and practice of human rights. Class sessions will include an overview of basic human rights standards and their application; instruction in human rights research and writing skills; and critical examination of approaches to human rights advocacy and enforcement. The clinic will have one or more student directors. Enrollment limited to eighteen. Permission of the instructors required. J.J. Silk , H.R. Metcalf, and S. Kwon.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students interested in applying for the Lowenstein Clinic should submit a resume and a short statement of interest by 4:30 p.m. on June 26. In addition to uploading these documents, students should also send them to barbara.mianzo@yale.edu. The statement should be no longer than one single-spaced page. It should primarily explain why you are interested in participating in the Clinic and should also include a brief summary of any experiences (employment, classes, volunteer activities) that would be relevant to international human rights work. Please indicate any foreign language ability. Interested LL.M. students must consult with the instructor before enrolling.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    SLB - 110 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10428

    Close
    • 20565-01
    • *†Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic
    • Schulz
      Balkin
      Manes
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic (20565). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail for students in their first semester, graded for students in their second semester. Students in the clinic will work on all aspects of cases involving press freedom, open government, free speech, and related issues. Clients include investigative journalists, traditional and new media organizations, activists, advocacy organizations, researchers and academics. Pending matters typically include litigation under the First Amendment and Freedom of Information laws in both federal and state courts. The clinic's cases involve a diverse array of issues, focusing in particular on national security, surveillance, privacy, technology and government accountability. Students may also have the opportunity to engage in non-litigation advocacy and client counseling. The seminar will focus on substantive law, case discussions, skills training, and ethical issues. Students will have the opportunity to write related research papers. Enrollment limited to sixteen. Permission of the instructors required. D. Schulz, J. Manes, and J.M. Balkin.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who list this course among their experiential course selections should also submit a statement of interest and a CV to the instructor (jack.balkin@yale.edu) by June 26, at 4:30 p.m. Students should also indicate if they have previously applied to the course.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is required.

    Location: ASH40 - A420 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10425

    Close
    • 20586-01
    • †Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic
    • Pottenger
      Gentes
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic (20586). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical seminar will represent homeowners fighting foreclosure in Connecticut state courts. They will conduct motion practice and discovery, including legal research and writing. Although this is primarily a litigation clinic, many of the clients are also participating in court-annexed mediation, in an effort to restructure their mortgages, so students will also gain experience in client counseling and ADR. Students will also provide brief advice and assistance to pro se homeowners at the courthouse. Enrollment limited to twelve. J.L. Pottenger, Jr., and J. Gentes.

    Note: Attendance at first class meeting is required. A no-drop policy will apply. Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; or SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Location: SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10411

    Close
    • 20051-01
    • Nonprofit Organizations Clinic
    • Simon
      Lindsay
      Davis
      Agsten
    • Fri 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 1 or 2
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Nonprofit Organizations Clinic (20051). 1 or 2 units, credit/fail. This clinical workshop will serve the needs of nonprofit organizations, nascent and established, that require help in the process of organization and incorporation, in obtaining tax exemption, and solving ongoing legal problems--organizations that cannot afford to retain private counsel. The class will meet as a group on six Fridays in each semester. *Students who take the clinic for 2 units and who attend two professional responsibility sessions will satisfy the professional responsibility requirement. †Students may satisfy the professional skills requirement through this course only if they receive 2 or more units. Also MGT 695a. J.G. Simon, M. Agsten, L.N. Davis, and B.B. Lindsay.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10429

    Close
    • 20139-01
    • †Prosecution Externship
    • Stith
      Pottenger
      Brennan
      Silverman
    • Wed 3:10 PM-4:30 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Prosecution Externship (20139). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical externship will assist state or federal prosecutors with their responsibilities, both before and at trial. Placements are available in New Haven and surrounding cities and in a variety of fields, including misdemeanors, felonies, or specialized areas such as career criminal, traffic, or appellate work. Weekly sessions will range from discussions of assigned readings to field trips to prisons, police laboratories, etc. Students will be required to keep journals and time records. Placements at the U.S. Attorney’s Office must be arranged at least four months in advance, to allow time for security clearance procedures. Applications and interviews for the State’s Attorney placements will take place during the first week of the term. Although enrollment is limited and permission of the instructors is required, timing and the involvement of outside agencies remove this clinic from the usual sign-up process for limited enrollment courses. J.L. Pottenger, Jr., K. Stith, and L. Brennan.

    Course Bidding Information: List this course among experiential permission courses. Open only to students who have been pre-selected to participate. Do not select this course during pre-registration if you are not one of those students.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).
    Note: The first class meeting will take place on Wednesday, September 3, 3:10 p.m., in room 122 at the Law School. Thereafter, the class will meet at 157 Church Street.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10486

    Close
    • 20664-01
    • †Start-Ups and the Law
    • Breeze
      Goldberg
      Lynch
    • Fri 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Start-Ups and the Law (20664). 2 units, credit/fail. This course is intended to give students a thorough look at legal issues faced by start-up companies. We will follow a semi-hypothetical company throughout its lifecycle, with the students creating its capitalization table and updating it through several rounds of financing and an acquisition. We will focus on corporate matters and have several sessions on related matters including intellectual property and executive compensation. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. W. Breeze, D.A. Goldberg, and C.L. Lynch.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10685

    Close
    • 20431-01
    • *†Supreme Court Advocacy
    • Greenhouse
      Balkin
      Messing
      Pincus
      Rothfeld
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Supreme Court Advocacy (20431). 6 units (3 fall, 3 spring). This course will furnish the opportunity to combine hands-on clinical work with seminar discussion of Supreme Court decision making and advocacy. It will begin with several sessions analyzing the Court as an institution, focusing on the practicalities of how the Court makes its decisions and how lawyers present their cases. Thereafter, students will work on a variety of actual cases before the Court, preparing petitions for certiorari and merits briefs. Students will work under the supervision of Yale faculty and experienced Supreme Court practitioners. The course will be a two-term offering and the work product may be used to satisfy the Substantial Paper requirement. The course demands a significant time investment and is not recommended for students with other time-intensive commitments. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of instructors required. L. Greenhouse, N. Messing, A. Pincus, C. Rothfeld and J.M. Balkin.

    Note: This course is open only to J.D. students.

    Course Bidding Information: Students admitted cannot drop during the open add/drop period. In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, any student wishing to be considered for admission must submit by June 26, 2014 at 4:30 p.m.: (1) a CV; (2) a writing sample (preferably involving legal writing); and (3) a one-page statement (a) addressing the nature of his or her interest in the course and (b) furnishing assurance that he or she will be able to satisfy the significant time commitments associated with the course. In connection with (b), applicants should indicate their anticipated course schedule for the 2014-2015 academic year, including their participation in other clinical offerings; any anticipated journal work; and anticipated writing to be completed independently of this course (including any papers that would satisfy the SAW or Substantial requirements). Significant academic or journal commitments outside of this course will certainly not be considered disqualifying, but will be taken into account in determining an applicant’s suitability for admission to the course. Other factors that will be considered include whether the applicant has already completed his or her SAW requirement. The submission of an application also constitutes consent to review of the applicant's Law School transcript. Note: Accepted students will be requested to limit class and other commitments after 3 p.m. on Wednesdays to ensure availability for team meetings.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10381

    Close
    • 20569-01
    • *†Veterans Legal Services Clinic
    • Wishnie
      Middleton
      Li
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Veterans Legal Services Clinic (20569) and Fieldwork (20596). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). The clinic and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. There are approximately 250,000 veterans currently residing in Connecticut, many with acute and unique legal needs related to their military service or return to civilian life. In this clinic, students represent Connecticut veterans in a range of individual litigation and institutional advocacy matters. Pending individual matters include (1) benefits applications for veterans who have suffered PTSD, sexual assault, and other injuries, in the first instance, on administrative appeal, and on judicial review of administrative denials; and (2) discharge upgrade applications, on administrative appeal and in U.S. District Court. Students also represent local and national veterans organizations in Freedom of Information Act litigation in U.S. District Court; civil rights litigation arising from sexual assault, other-than-honorable discharges of service members suffering undiagnosed PTSD, and wrongful detention and deportation of immigrant veterans; and federal and state regulatory and legislative advocacy concerning veterans' employment issues, treatment of service members with PTSD and military sexual assault and rape. The seminar portion is a practice-oriented examination of advocacy on behalf of veterans and of social justice lawyering generally. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. M. Wishnie, B. Li, and M. Middleton.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among your experiential course selections, you must also submit a statement of interest in the clinic and a copy of your resume by the close of early registration on June 26, at 4:30 p.m.
    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10436

    Close
    • 20596-01
    • Veteran Legal Services Fieldwork
    • Wishnie
      Middleton
      Li
    • 2
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Veteran Legal Services Fieldwork (20596). 2 units. Must be taken in conjunction with the Veteran Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M. Wishnie, B. Li, and M. Middleton.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in both the seminar and the fieldwork sections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10437

    Close
    • 20465-01
    • *†Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic
    • Wishnie
      Hallett
      Ahmad
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic (20465) and Fieldwork (20468). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). Students will represent immigrants and low-wage workers in Connecticut in labor, immigration, and other civil rights areas, through litigation for individuals and non-litigation advocacy for community-based organizations. In litigation matters, students will handle cases at all stages of legal proceedings in Immigration Court, Board of Immigration Appeals, U.S. District Court, the Second Circuit, and state courts. The non-litigation work will include representation of grassroots organizations, labor and faith organizations in regulatory and legislative reform efforts, media advocacy, strategic planning, and other matters. The seminar portion is a practice-oriented examination of advocacy on behalf of workers and non-citizens and of social justice lawyering generally. The course will be a two-term offering (4 units each term). The clinical course and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously in both terms. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. M. Ahmad, N. Hallett, and M. Wishnie.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing the clinic experiential permission courses, interested students should submit a resume and a statement of interest by June 26, 2014, at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Location: SLB - 110 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10433

    Close
    • 20468-01
    • Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Fieldwork
    • Wishnie
      Hallett
      Ahmad
    • 2
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Fieldwork (20468). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. The clinical course and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously in both terms. M. Ahmad, N. Hallett, and M. Wishnie.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in both the seminar and the fieldwork sections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the follow non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; SFALP (New Haven Corp Counsel section only).

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10434

    Close
    • 20170-01
    • Administrative Law
    • Jolls
    • Tue 11:10 AM-1:00 PM
      Thu 11:10 AM-1:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Administrative Law (20170). 4 units. There are vast areas of life in which much (often most) lawmaking falls to administrative agencies, rather than to legislators and judges. Examples include the functioning of markets in securities, telecommunications, and energy; the safety of food, drugs, cars, airplanes, and workplaces; the regulation of pollution, public land use, advertising, immigration, election campaigns, and union organizing; and the distribution of all kinds of social welfare benefits. This course will introduce the legal and practical foundations of the administrative state, considering rationales for delegation to administrative agencies, procedural and substantive constraints on agency rulemaking and adjudication, judicial review of agency actions, and the relationship of agencies to Congress and the President.

    The written work required for the course will be five six-page analytic essays, due over the course of the semester, on the course concepts and materials. Students interested in completing their Substantial Paper or Supervised Analytic Writing on an administrative law topic may seek permission to sign up for additional writing credit, as neither Substantial Paper nor Supervised Analytic Writing projects can be substituted for the five required essays for the course. C. Jolls.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Tue)
    SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10390

    Close
    • 20655-01
    • American Indian Tribal Law
    • Fidell
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    American Indian Tribal Law (20655). 2 units. The course will study the internal law and legal institutions of American Indian tribes, including tribal constitutions, statutes and ordinances, customary law, and tribal common law. Among the issues to be examined are intertribal common law, the interaction between tribal and non-tribal sources of law, judicial independence, political questions, citizenship, civil rights and liberties, and family law. The course will consider whether there should be an American Indian Supreme Court, and if so, how it should be designed and what legal, political and other obstacles it might face. Paper required. E.R. Fidell.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10367

    Close
    • 20439-01
    • *[The] American Legal Profession
    • Gordon
    • Wed 3:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment (50)
    • exam required
    Expand

    *[The] American Legal Profession (20439). 2 or 3 units. This course will meet three hours per week for the first nine weeks of the semester, September 3 through October 29. A credit/fail option is available to students who so elect during the first two weeks of the term. This course will deal with selected aspects of the history, organization, economics, ethics, and possible futures of the legal profession in the United States. Likely topics will include, in addition to the ABA's Model Rules of Professional Conduct and other rules regulating lawyers: demographic changes in the profession; the evolution of law firms, bar associations, and law schools from the early twentieth century to the present; the development of corporate law, personal injury, mass torts, prosecutorial and criminal defense practices, and the "public-interest" bar; the dominant professional ethic of adversary-advocacy, and its critics; the regulation of lawyers; the economics of the market for legal services; the organization and culture of law firm practice; the role of the role of the lawyer as counselor; and the export of American lawyering models abroad. Self-scheduled examination, with option of a paper for extra graded credit. R.W. Gordon.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10380
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20629-01
    • Antitrust
    • Collins
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Antitrust (20629). 4 units. This course will survey antitrust law, economics, and enforcement mechanisms. The course will cover price fixing and other collaborative endeavors among competitors, mergers and acquisitions, monopolization and dominant firm conduct, and distribution arrangements. While we will examine the seminal historical cases, much of what we will cover will be contemporary applications, including the eBooks price-fixing litigation, the Anheuser-Busch/Grupo Modelo beer merger, the Silicon Valley high-tech employee “no-poach” class action, and the Google monopolization investigation. In each case, we will examine what the companies (allegedly) did, why they did it, and whether the law does and should prohibit the companies’ conduct. There is no economics prerequisite for this course, but some interest in how companies operate will make the course more satisfying. Self-scheduled open book examination. W.D. Collins.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Tue)
    SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10475
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20175-01
    • Antitrust: Directed Research
    • Priest
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Antitrust: Directed Research (20175). Units to be arranged. This seminar will provide an opportunity for discussion among students interested in writing Substantial or Supervised Analytic Writing papers on current (or historical) antitrust topics. Paper required. G. L. Priest.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10483

    Close
    • 20083-01
    • Behavioral and Institutional Economics
    • Shiller
    • Mon 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
      Wed 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Behavioral and Institutional Economics (20083). 3 units. Behavioral economics incorporates insights from other social sciences, such as psychology and sociology, into economic models, and attempts to explain anomalies that defy standard economic analysis. Institutional economics is the study of the evolution of economic organizations, laws, contracts, and customs as part of a historical and continuing process of economic development. Behavioral economics and institutional economics are naturally treated together, since so much of the logic and design of economic institutions has to do with complexities of human behavior. Topics include economic fluctuations and speculation, herd behavior, attitudes toward risk, money illusion, involuntary unemployment, saving, investment, poverty, identity, religion, trust, risk management, social welfare institutions, private risk management institutions, and institutions to foster economic development. This course will meet according to the Yale Graduate School calendar. Midterm examination and take-home final examination of short essay form. Also ECON 527a/MGT 565a. R.J. Shiller.

    Location: EVANS - 1300 (Mon)
    EVANS - 1300 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10440
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20219-01
    • Business Organizations
    • Macey
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Business Organizations (20219). 4 units. An introduction to the business corporation laws affecting the rights and roles of corporate boards of directors, senior executive officers, and shareholders, with an emphasis on large, publicly traded firms. Shareholder's economic interests are examined from the perspective of limited liability and dividend standards, expectations of liquidity or transferability of shares, and the use of debt capital as a mode of financing corporate activity. Shareholders' limited participation rights in corporate decision making will be examined from the perspective of state and federal rules governing shareholder voting and the disclosure of corporate information and the notion of managerial expertise (e.g., as evidenced by judicial application of the "business judgment rule"). The latter part of the course will focus on directors' and officers' fiduciary obligations to shareholders, examining the operation of these duties in a variety of settings and transactions. Issues relating to the roles and functions assumed by corporate attorneys (with respect to their clients) and the role of business corporations within society will also be addressed. Self-scheduled examination. J.R. Macey.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Mon)
    SLB - 127 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10407
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20067-01
    • Capital Markets
    • Gorton
    • Mon 1:00 PM-2:20 PM
      Wed 1:00 PM-2:20 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Capital Markets (20067). 3 units. Capital Markets is a course covering a range of topics, including the design, pricing, and trading of corporate bonds, structured notes, hybrid securities, credit derivatives, and structured products, such as asset-backed securities and collateralized debt obligations. This course aims to provide a set of tools, concepts, and ideas that will serve students over the course of a career. Basic tools such as fixed income mathematics, swaps and options are studied and used to address security design, trading, and pricing questions. Topics are approached from different angles: conceptual and technical theory, cases, documents (e.g., bond prospectuses, consent solicitations), and current events. Students should have taken introductory finance and have some knowledge of basic statistics (e.g., regression analysis, conditional probability), basic mathematics (e.g., algebra, matrix algebra); working knowledge of a spreadsheet package is helpful. Two examinations, six cases, and fourteen homework problems. Also MGT 947a. G. Gorton.

    Note: This course will meeting according to the Yale School of Management calendar.

    Location: EVANS - 2410 (Mon)
    EVANS - 2410 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10846

    Close
    • 20619-01
    • Civil Appellate Practice and Procedure
    • Days
    • Wed 3:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Civil Appellate Practice and Procedure (20619). 3 units. First-year civil procedure courses often provide students with only a brief introduction to civil appellate practice and procedure. This course is designed to build on, and expand upon, that introduction, offering an in-depth consideration of the following subjects, among others: the historical background, and non-inevitability of appeals; the constitutional and statutory bases of appellate jurisdiction; the law-making and error-correcting functions of appellate courts; and the respective roles that judges and litigants play in the appellate process. Open only to J.D. students. Paper required. D.S. Days, III.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10354

    Close
    • 20241-01
    • Conflict of Laws
    • Brilmayer
      Butler
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Conflict of Laws (20241). 3 units. Choice of law, personal jurisdiction, and judgments enforcement in the American federal system. This course has some overlap with civil procedure -- students will mostly already have at least a basic familiarity with the law of judgments, personal jurisdiction, and the Erie Railroad doctrine. But the heart of the course is common law, statutory law, and constitutional law relating to extraterritorial application of state and federal substantive rules, in both the interstate and the international context. The assigned course book with be Brilmayer, Goldsmith, and O'Hara-O'Connor, Conflict of Laws: Cases and Materials (Aspen Publishing, 6th edition, 2011). Students may arrange to write a paper instead, including papers for Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. L. Brilmayer and J. Butler.

    Note: This three-unit course will meet on a four-hour schedule to build in make-up time so that additional sessions do not have to be schedule to replace days when the instructors' schedules call for them to be away.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Wed)
    SLB - 122 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10351
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20442-01
    • Constitutional Interpretation
    • Amar
      Bobbitt
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Constitutional Interpretation (20442). 2 units. An advanced constitutional law course, open only to students who have already taken an introductory course in American Constitutional Law at Yale or elsewhere. This course will revolve around the text of the United States Constitution and four books authored by the instructors: P. Bobbitt, Constitutional Fate (1982); A. Amar, America's Constitution: A Biography (2005); P. Bobbitt, Constitutional Interpretation (1991); and A. Amar, America's Unwritten Constitution (2012). Self-scheduled examination or paper option. A.R. Amar and P. Bobbitt.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10343
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 10001-01
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Balkin
    • Fri 10:10 AM-11:00 AM
      Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 111 (Fri)
    ASH40 - A420 (Mon)
    ASH40 - A420 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11656
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 10001-02
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Gewirtz
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 5:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    SLB - 110 (Thu)
    SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11657
    Exam: 1/14/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 120
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 10001-03
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Rodriguez
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 5:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    SLB - 112 (Thu)
    SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11658
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 6 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 10001-04
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Rubenfeld
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: ASH40 - A422 (Wed)
    ASH40 - A422 (Mon)
    SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11659
    Exam: 1/14/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 122
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.5 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Close
    • 10001-05
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Stith
    • Fri 11:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 111 (Fri)
    SLB - 111 (Tue)
    SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11660
    Exam: 1/14/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your name.

    Close
    • 10001-A
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Amar
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 122 (Mon)
    SLB - 122 (Wed)
    SLB - 128 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11654
    Exam: 1/14/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Close
    • 10001-B
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Siegel
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 120 (Mon)
    SLB - 120 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11655
    Exam: 1/14/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 11001-01
    • Contracts I
    • Brilmayer
    • Fri 10:10 AM-11:00 AM
      Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 124 (Fri)
    SLB - 109 (Tue)
    SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11663
    Exam: 1/09/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 120
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 11001-02
    • Contracts I
    • Carter
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 11:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    SLB - 111 (Thu)
    SLB - 124 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11664
    Exam: 1/09/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 121
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Close
    • 11001-03
    • Contracts I
    • Hansmann
    • Fri 10:10 AM-11:00 AM
      Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Fri)
    ASH40 - A424 (Tue)
    ASH40 - A424 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11665
    Exam: 1/09/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 122
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 11001-04
    • Contracts I
    • Listokin
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: ASH40 - A424 (Wed)
    ASH40 - A424 (Mon)
    SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11666
    Exam: 1/09/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Close
    • 11001-05
    • Contracts I
    • Markovits
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 5:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    SLB - 124 (Thu)
    ASH40 - A005 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11667
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Examination: Answers Only: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office, Monday through Thursday, between 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. You may upload your answers.

    Close
    • 11001-A
    • Contracts I
    • Chua
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11661
    Exam: 1/09/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.
    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 11001-B
    • Contracts I
    • Schwartz
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11662
    Exam: 1/09/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Close
    • 20044-01
    • Convicting the Innocent
    • Duke
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Convicting the Innocent (20044). 2 or 3 units. This course will explore the causes of and remedies for miscarriages of justice in which persons other than the perpetrators of criminal offenses are found guilty. The course will examine the processes of memory and suggestion, cognition, belief formation and resistance to change, lying and lie detection, the motivations and opportunities for fabricating evidence, imposter and unqualified experts, incompetent lawyers, poverty, and their relationships to legal rules and practices. Among the specific contexts in which the examinations will occur are allegations of child sexual abuse, stranger rapes, robberies, and murders. Some attention will be paid to the special problem of capital punishment. Students will probably be asked to present a topic during the term and to ask a question or make a comment during every class meeting. Attendance and participation is therefore required. Students who have selected writing topics and have had those topics approved by November 30th may receive writing credit in lieu of the examination. Others will take an open-book examination, for which they will receive 2 units of credit. The credits awarded for papers will depend on the work involved in the paper. Papers may qualify for Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit. Scheduled examination or paper option. S.B. Duke.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10362
    Exam: 1/06/2015 at 2:00 PM SLB: 127
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 2 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your name.

    Close
    • 20507-01
    • Corporate Finance
    • Tookes
    • Tue 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
      Thu 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Corporate Finance (20507). 3 units. This course will focus on financial management from the perspective of inside the corporation or operating entity. It will build upon the concepts from the core finance courses, using lectures to develop the theory, and cases and problem sets to provide applications. Topics covered include capital budgeting and valuation; optimal capital structure; initial public offerings; mergers; and corporate restructuring. This course will follow the School of Management calendar. Also MGT 541a.. H. Tookes.

    Note: This course is offered in two sections. The second section meets on Tuesday and Thursday, 1:00 - 2:20 p.m.

    Note: There will be five places for Law students in each section, for a total of 10 places.

    Course Selection Students who select this course should send an email to registrar.law@yale.edu to indicate whether they prefer the first or the second section, so that they may be enrolled in the appropriate section if they are accepted.

    Location: EVANS - 2200 (Tue)
    EVANS - 2200 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10334

    Close
    • 20507-02
    • Corporate Finance
    • Tookes
    • Tue 1:00 PM-2:20 PM
      Thu 1:00 PM-2:20 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Corporate Finance (20507). 3 units. This course will focus on financial management from the perspective of inside the corporation or operating entity. It will build upon the concepts from the core finance courses, using lectures to develop the theory, and cases and problem sets to provide applications. Topics covered include capital budgeting and valuation; optimal capital structure; initial public offerings; mergers; and corporate restructuring. This course will follow the School of Management calendar. Also MGT 541a.. H. Tookes.

    Note: This course is offered in two sections. The second section meets on Tuesday and Thursday, 1:00 - 2:20 p.m.

    Note: There will be five places for Law students in each section, for a total of 10 places.

    Course Selection Students who select this course should send an email to registrar.law@yale.edu to indicate whether they prefer the first or the second section, so that they may be enrolled in the appropriate section if they are accepted.

    Location: EVANS - 2200 (Tue)
    EVANS - 2200 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 11676

    Close
    • 20270-01
    • Criminal Procedure: Adjudication
    • Duke
    • Tue 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Procedure: Adjudication (20270). 3 units. This course will cover pre-trial proceedings, plea-bargaining, right to trial by jury, effective assistance of counsel, joinder and severance, right of confrontation, prosecutorial discretion, some trial proceedings, and double jeopardy. Class participation is expected and may be taken into account in grading. Criminal Procedure: Investigation is not a prerequisite. Scheduled examination. S.B. Duke.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Tue)
    SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10361
    Exam: 1/08/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your name.

    Close
    • 20061-01
    • Criminal Law and Administration
    • Yaffe
    • Thu 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • Criminal Law & Administration
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Law and Administration (20061). 3 units. This course will be concerned with fundamental topics in substantive criminal law. It will be concerned with the principles underlying the definitions of crimes (the definitions, primarily, of the acts and mental states that constitute crimes); with the way in which mistakes of fact and law are treated by the criminal law; with the law governing homicide and rape; with the general doctrines concerned with attempt and accomplice liability, which are of relevance to many different crimes; and with a selection of exculpating conditions, namely, insanity, intoxication, self-defense, necessity and duress. The Model Penal Code will serve as our primary, although not exclusive, statutory text, as it does in many jurisdictions. This course is given in several sections; it must be taken before graduation. Students may satisfy the graduation requirement by satisfactorily completeting Criminal Law and Administration or Ciminal Law, but they may not enroll in both courses. Self-scheduled examination. G. Yaffe.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Thu)
    SLB - 127 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10439
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20657-01
    • Election Law 2014
    • Gerken
    • Tue 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Election Law 2014 (20657). 3 units. This course will offer a survey of the law governing the U.S. political process. It will examine the principles that shape our political institutions and the relationship between democratic procedures and contemporary politics. Topics will include the Voting Rights Act, political and racial gerrymandering, the regulation of political parties, and campaign finance. Enrollment limited to seventy. Scheduled examination (web). H.K. Gerken.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Tue)
    SLB - 129 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10375
    Exam: 1/08/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Close
    • 20558-01
    • Equality, Citizenship, and Sovereignty, Transnationally
    • Resnik
      Siegel
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Equality, Citizenship, and Sovereignty, Transnationally (20558). 3 units. We will explore, through a comparative lens and in a transnational field, how constitutional democracies and federations respond to rights claims by citizens, residents, and others within their borders. How does the aspiration to treat "all persons" as rights-holders conflict with practices that differentiate between members and others? What distinctions are consistent with dignity and equality? Through the course, we will compare how different jurisdictions respond to these questions, and we will trace the influence of transnational law across borders. Readings will include constitutional provisions, statutes, cases from various countries, and essays and articles from the fields of law, history, and political theory. Self-scheduled open book examination; upon early consultation with instructors, a few students may do papers with permission and the possibility of an extra credit. No credit/fail option. Self-scheduled examination with limited paper option. J. Resnik and R.B. Siegel.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10416
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Notes: Exam Length: Entire exam period.

    Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20622-01
    • *Ethics in Law and Markets
    • Macey
      Fleming
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    *Ethics in Law and Markets (20622). 3 units. The focus of this course is on how a society’s ethical norms and values have been reflected in societies throughout history. Generally speaking, this course will study the validity of the hypothesis that “an economic system runs on trust, reputation, and ethics, and that any deficit in these fundamental components of capital markets and financial markets necessarily will imperil the financial system as a whole." We will discuss the evolution of views on ethics in business generally and how, if at all, the dominant ethical views in a society affect business conditions. We also will consider the way that globalization and the emergence of economic interactions among many different cultures have affected attitudes and practices related to ethics. We also will consider what the future of trust, reputation and ethics in business. Attention will be paid to ethical issues within the private sector as well as in government and across society generally. Paper required. G. Fleming and J.R. Macey.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10405

    Close
    • 20456-01
    • European Union Law
    • Walker
    • Tue 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    European Union Law (20456). 3 units. The course will offer an analysis of the development and contemporary framework of the law of the European Union. It will trace the evolution of the European Union from a "common market" and Customs Union of six member states under the 1957 Treaty of Rome to its present standing as a wide-ranging supranational polity of twenty-eight member states with broad jurisdiction over social policy, defense, and internal security, as well as its core economic law. The course will examine the institutional architecture of the European Union alongside its substantive law and policy. It will focus on some of the leading cases of the Court of Justice and will examine the recurring "constitutional" debates and conflicts involving the Court of Justice and other institutions of the EU on the one hand and the supreme courts and other institutions of the member states on the other. The course will conclude by considering the future prospects of the world's most developed supranational experiment in an era of fiscal uncertainty and changing security concerns. Self-scheduled examination (web). N. Walker.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10332
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20166-01
    • Evidence
    • Kahan
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Evidence (20166). 3 units. This course will examine the rules and doctrines regulating the presentation of factual proof in trials in the United States, with primary focus on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Scheduled examination. D.M. Kahan.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    SLB - 121 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10392
    Exam: 1/13/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20018-01
    • Family Law
    • Schultz
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Family Law (20018). 3 units. This course will address the regulation of intimate relationships between adults (marriage and divorce, civil unions, prenuptial contracts, reproductive technologies, etc.), between parents and children (child custody, adoption, termination of parental rights, etc.), and the involvement of the state in intimate, sexual and reproductive life generally (constitutional privacy and equal protection). The interplay among the State, family, and market, and the formation of personal identity in and through these arenas, will be explored throughout the course. Issues of socioeconomic class, gender, race, and sexuality will arise in many of the areas we study over the course of the semester. Scheduled examination (web). V. Schultz.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    SLB - 112 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10424
    Exam: 1/13/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 122
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20366-01
    • Federal and State Courts in a Federal System
    • Resnik
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal and State Courts in a Federal System (20366). 4 units. The "Federal Courts” play a central role in today’s political debates. The class will focus on the development of the identity, doctrine, and jurisprudence of the federal courts in relation to state courts and to the other branches of the federal government. To do so, the class will consider the degree to which the U.S. Constitution allocates authority among the branches of the federal government and among state, federal, and tribal courts. Questions of the meaning of national and of state “sovereignty” lace the materials. Beneath the sometimes dry discussions of jurisdictional rules and doctrines of comity lie conflicts about such issues as race, religion, the beginning and end of life, abortion, Indian tribal rights, and gender equality. In addition to considering the political and historical context of the doctrinal developments, the class will examine the institutional structures that have evolved in the federal courts, theories of federalism, current questions about the size and shape of the federal courts, the different methods for judicial selection and kinds of state and federal judges, as well as the effects of social and demographic categories on the processes of federal adjudication. On occasion, the class will also occasionally consider concepts of federalism comparatively. Class participation will be part of the final grade. No credit/fail option. Self-scheduled examination. J. Resnik.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Wed)
    SLB - 128 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10418
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8.5 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20222-01
    • Federal Income Taxation
    • Alstott
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal Income Taxation (20222). 4 units. An introductory course on the federal income taxation of individuals and businesses. The course will provide an overview of the basic legal doctrine and will emphasize statutory interpretation and a variety of income tax policy issues. The class will consider the role of the courts, the Congress, and the IRS in making tax law and tax policy and will consider the impact of the tax law on the distribution of income and opportunity and on economic behavior. Topics will include fringe benefits, business expenses, the interest deduction, the taxation of the family, and capital gains. No prerequisites. No preference given to third-year students. Enrollment capped at seventy. Self-scheduled examination. A.L. Alstott.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Tue)
    SLB - 129 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10340
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    You may use the "search" (control-F) function of your computer in consulting your notes during the exam.

    Close
    • 20658-01
    • Globalization and Legal Theory
    • Walker
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Globalization and Legal Theory (20658). 2 units. This course will investigate the contribution of legal theory to our understanding of the new legal forms and consequences associated with the "globalization" of economic, informational, cultural and political forms. In an age when ever more legal processes and transactions cross national borders, and when global and regional legal institutions ( United Nations, World Trade Organization, etc) and doctrines (human rights, global constitutionalism, global administrative law, etc.) proliferate, there is a need to look critically at our basic instruments for comprehending the world of law. We need to address again the adequacy of our existing tools of analysis of legal order -- often developed to examine legal relations within the modern state -- and to examine the potential of new explanatory devices. In particular, an examination of the relevance to transnational and global legal forms of approaches based upon or derived from legal positivism, natural law, various process-based theories or critical legal perspectives, supplies a broad platform of inquiry. Paper required. N. Walker.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10333

    Close
    • 50110-01
    • Graduate Seminar
    • Brilmayer
    • Wed 6:10 PM-7:30 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Graduate Seminar (50110). 1 unit, credit/fail. This course will offer LLM students an opportunity to explore current legal scholarship in a wide range of public and private law areas, including U.S., comparative and international law. Weekly sessions will feature Yale Law School faculty leading discussions of recent and current research. LLM students, for whom this class was designed, are strongly encouraged to participate; they receive enrollment automatically and need to notify the instructor if they choose not to enroll. L. Brilmayer.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11623

    Close
    • 20559-01
    • History and Theory of Human Rights
    • Kumm
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment (20)
    • paper required
    Expand

    History and Theory of Human Rights (20559). 2 units. There is a great deal of controversy about the nature and origins of human rights. We will seek to gain an understanding of when and why human rights emerged, how their understanding changed over time, both in terms of substance and in terms of their adequate legal institutionalization. In the first part of the course, we will discuss some leading contemporary historical and normatively focused works on human rights. Seminar participants should be prepared to do a considerable amount of reading for the first part of the course. In the second part of the course, we will focus on the discussion of student papers and their chosen topics. Paper required. Enrollment will be capped at twenty. M. Kumm.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10446

    Close
    • 20134-01
    • Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events
    • Kahn
      Silk
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events (20134). 2 units. The Human Rights Workshop provides an opportunity to discuss scholarship, practice, and policy bearing on issues broadly related to human rights. Conducted in workshop format, the course will feature recent writings in the field, presentations by scholars and practitioners, and pertinent current events. The topic of the workshop this semester will be the theory and practice of social and economic rights. Our concerns will be interdisciplinary as we look to the history and implementation of these rights, as well as their relationship with globalization and development. The workshop will meet weekly, with guest speakers every other week. In off weeks, students will read and discuss texts written by the speakers or relevant to their presentations. Requirements include active participation in the seminar and a research paper on a topic to be approved by the instructors. Students may earn an additional credit if they wish to produce a major research paper. Paper required. P.W. Kahn and J.J. Silk.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10394

    Close
    • 20257-01
    • Human Rights: History and the Present
    • Weil
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Human Rights: History and the Present (20257). 2 or 3 units. Universal human rights were proclaimed at the end of the eighteenth century in America and in France. Today, they represent the world’s premier moral language. But their full realization is still a work in progress. What are human rights? How did social movements play a role in their emergence and dissemination? This course will examine the legal means by which some human rights have been successfully guaranteed while questioning the degree to which they are guaranteed (are they absolute or conditional rights?) as well as their geographical scope (universal, regional, national). The class will explore different fields within which the subject of “human rights” has developed since the Enlightenment era (including the abolition of slavery, women’s rights, citizenship and refugees, the reduction of racial and ethnic persecution and discrimination, as well as economic, social and environmental rights). Drawing on these explorations, the course will examine the values, interests, political events, and social interactions that permitted human rights to progress and, occasionally, to regress in the West and elsewhere throughout the world. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. P. Weil.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10432
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 48 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20402-01
    • Intellectual Property: An Introduction
    • Ayres
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Intellectual Property: An Introduction (20402). 4 units. An introduction to the law of trade secret, patent, copyright, and trademark. The course will study current policy debates about intellectual property reform and alternative methods for promoting innovation and knowledge production. Self-scheduled examination (web). I. Ayres.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Tue)
    SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10344
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20112-01
    • International Law
    • Kumm
    • Mon 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    International Law (20112). 3 units. This course will provide a theoretically informed basic introduction to some core themes and doctrinal areas in international law as it has developed after World War II. Topics will include how international law is generated (the sources of international law); the relationship between national and international law; state responsibility; the use of force; and human rights. Scheduled examination (web). M. Kumm.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10442
    Exam: 1/06/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 124
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Close
    • 20396-01
    • International Investment Law
    • Reisman
      Aguilar Alvarez Colunga
    • Tue 9:10 AM-11:00 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    International Investment Law (20396). 2 units. As foreign direct investment has increased as a function of globalization, so have disputes about it. This seminar will examine the treaties concluded to encourage and regulate foreign investment, the international law and procedure applied in the third-party resolution of international investment disputes, treaties concluded to encourage and regulate foreign investment, and the critical policy issues that must now be addressed. Papers may qualify for Substantial Paper or Supervised Analytic Writing credit. Enrollment will be capped at twenty-five. Scheduled examination (web) or paper option. W.M. Reisman and G. Aguilar-Alvarez.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10414
    Exam: 1/08/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 122
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Close
    • 20238-01
    • International Trade Law in a Globalizing World
    • Esty
    • Mon 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    International Trade Law in a Globalizing World (20238). 3 units. This seminar will explore the interlocking structure of laws, policies, and negotiating practices that undergird international trade. Particular emphasis will be placed on the governance structures that regulate the trading system including multilateral institutions (the World Trade Organization as well as the IMF and other bodies) and domestic entities (the US Trade Representative and the International Trade Commission). Focus will be given to worldwide efforts to open markets through the Global Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) as well as the Global Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) and regional accords such as the North American Free Trade Agreement. Special attention will be paid to how the system of international economic law has addressed the integration of new issues including environmental protection, poverty alleviation, human and labor rights, and public health into the trade regime. Self-scheduled examination. Also F&ES 871a. D.C. Esty.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Mon)
    ASH40 - A005 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10366
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20621-01
    • †Law in the United States: Economics, Politics, and the Corporation
    • Deutsch
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    †Law in the United States: Economics, Politics and the Corporation (20621). 2 units. This course will analyze legal regulation of the corporation to determine how law functions in the United States. Prerequisite: Basic corporate law. Knowledge of securities law is desirable but not required. Self-scheduled examination. J.G. Deutsch.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10355
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20036-01
    • Law, Economics, and Organization
    • Jolls
      Romano
    • Thu 4:10 PM-5:40 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Law, Economics, and Organization (20036). 1 unit, credit/fail. This seminar will meet jointly with the Law, Economics, and Organization Workshop, an interdisciplinary faculty workshop that brings to Yale Law School scholars, generally from other universities, who present papers based on their current research. The topics will involve a broad range of issues of general legal and social science interest. Students registering for the seminar and participating in the workshop will receive 1 unit of ungraded credit per term. Neither Substantial Paper nor Supervised Analytic Writing credit will be available through the seminar. Short reaction papers will be required during the term. C. Jolls and R. Romano.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10391

    Close
    • 20661-01
    • Law, Violence and Sacrifice
    • Kahn
      Halbertal
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Law, Violence, and Sacrifice (20661). 3 units. To the popular understanding it often appears as if the object of law is the prevention of violence. Liberal political theory gives expressilp[hlon to this idea when it imagines the legal order as a successor to a violent state of nature. Yet, political and legal theorists have long been interested in the way in which law not only prohibits, but also relies upon and deploys violence. A legal system inevitably legitimates some forms of violence, while prohibiting others. This is immediately evident with respect to punishment, but it is broadly familiar in practices of policing. The courtroom, too, has been described as a site of violence, not just because of the punishment that follows judgment, but because of law’s role in shaping social practices. A legal decision inevitably eliminates some voices in a competition among interpretations – that too is a form of violence. Law also has a necessary relationship to sacrificial violence. While liberal thought tends to imagine a social contract as the origin of law, an alternative view places law’s origin in sacrifice. Whatever we might make of these claims of origins, we are deeply familiar with the idea that the force of law depends upon the willingness to sacrifice for the sake of the state whose law it is. Punishment, policing, judging, sacrifice, and defense are all sites of law’s violence. This course will take a broadly interdisciplinary approach to the question of law’s relationship to violence, reading texts in philosophy, theology, jurisprudence, and anthropology. Paper required. P.W. Kahn and M. Halbertal.

    Location: ASH40 - A424 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10393

    Close
    • 20522-01
    • *Legal Profession: Traversing the Ethical Minefield
    • Fox
    • Mon 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment (50)
    • exam required
    Expand

    *Legal Profession: Traversing the Ethical Minefield (20522). 3 units. Almost every course you take in law school makes you better able to help your clients fulfill their hopes and dreams. This course is designed to help fulfill your own professional obligations while also providing services to your clients consistent with their ethical entitlements. Through the use of hypothetical problems grounded in the real world, the class will explore many of the challenging dilemmas that confront the conscientious lawyer who wants to conform his or her conduct to the applicable rules of professional conduct and other law governing lawyers. At the same time we will consider whether the present rules of professional conduct properly address the issues with which the profession must grapple in striking delicate balances among the obligations of lawyers vis-à-vis clients, lawyers as officers of the court and lawyers as citizens. The class will use a casebook, Susan Martyn & Lawrence Fox, Traversing the Ethical Minefield, and a standards book, Susan Martyn, Lawrence Fox & Brad Wendel, The Law Governing Lawyers. Class attendance and participation are essential. Enrollment capped at thirty. Scheduled examination. L. Fox.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    SLB - 121 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10373
    Exam: 1/06/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.25 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Close
    • 20308-01
    • [The] Philosophy of Law I
    • Shapiro
    • Mon 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] Philosophy of Law I (20308). 3 units. This course will examine a variety of historically influential responses to basic questions concerning the nature and legitimacy of law and the difference (if any) between law and morality. Readings will include works by legal positivists, natural lawyers, legal realists, and critical legal scholars. This course is the first half of a two-course sequence that continues with Philosophy of Law II. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also PHIL 703a. S.J. Shapiro.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10426
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 48 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 12001-A
    • Procedure I
    • Gluck
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 129 (Wed)
    SLB - 129 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11668
    Exam: 1/12/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 12001-B
    • Procedure I
    • Koh
    • Mon 8:20 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:20 AM-10:00 AM
      Fri 8:20 AM-10:00 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Wed)
    SLB - 129 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11669
    Exam: 1/12/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.25 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 12001-C
    • Procedure I
    • Lemos
    • Tue 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    SLB - 120 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11670
    Exam: 1/12/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 120
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 5 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.
    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20207-01
    • Property
    • Ayres
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Property (20207). 4 units. The course will explore the law regulating the rights of private property broadly conceived. Our principal focus will be on entitlements in land, but we will also think about the legal entitlements to other scarce resources. Topics will include limitations on the rights of landowners to exclude others; estates in land; co-ownership; landlord-tenant law and the slum housing problem; nuisance law; easements and covenants as means of cooperation among neighbors; and eminent domain, zoning, and other tools of public land use regulation. Scheduled examination (web). I. Ayres.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10345
    Exam: 1/08/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Close
    • 20535-01
    • Proportionality in Constitutional Law
    • Barak
    • Wed 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Proportionality in Constitutional Law (20535). 2 units. In many countries (e.g., Canada, Germany, Spain, Brazil, Israel), and under some International documents (e.g., the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms), the regular legislature can take action affecting constitutional rights that are part of the Bill of Rights, so long as such effect is proportional (that is, suitable and necessary to achieve legitimate government ends and properly balanced). This seminar will look into the concept of proportionality, its scope and its rationales. We shall do so on a comparative law basis. We shall compare it with U.S. jurisprudence, while trying to see whether constitutional rights are better protected by the U.S. method of categorization or by a proportionality analysis. We shall follow the development of proportionality in recent U.S. Constitutional Law and evaluate its place in the constitutional scheme of things. This course will meet during the first half of the term. Paper required. A. Barak.

    Course Bidding Information: Students should submit statements of interest by June 26, 2014, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10348

    Close
    • 20040-01
    • Public Order of the World Community: A Contemporary International Law
    • Reisman
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Public Order of the World Community: A Contemporary International Law (20040). 4 units. This introduction to contemporary international law will study the role of authority in the decision-making processes of the world community, at the constitutive level where international law is made and applied and where the indispensable institutions for making decisions are established and maintained, as well as in the various sectors of the public order that is established. Consideration will be given to formal as well as operational prescriptions and practice with regard to the participants in this system (states, intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations, political parties, pressure groups, multinational enterprises, other private associations, private armies and gangs, and individuals); the formal and informal arenas of interaction; the allocation of control over and regulation of the resources of the planet; the protection of people and the regulation of nationality; and the allocation among states of jurisdiction to make and apply law. In contrast to more traditional approaches, which try to ignore the role of power in this system, that role will be candidly acknowledged, and the problems and opportunities it presents will be explored. Special attention will be given to (1) theory; (2) the establishment, transformation, and termination of actors; (3) control of access to and regulation of resources, including environmental prescriptions; (4) nationality and human rights, and (5) the regulation of armed conflict. Enrollment will be capped at twenty-five. Scheduled examination (web) or paper option. W.M. Reisman.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    SLB - 109 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10415
    Exam: 1/13/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 8 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your name.

    Close
    • 50100-02
    • RdgGrp: Health & Health Care
    • Gluck
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14672

    Close
    • 50100-07
    • RdgGrp: Originalism
    • Priest
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15650

    Close
    • 50100-04
    • RdgGrp: Political Law
    • Gerken
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15550

    Close
    • 50100-10
    • RdgGrp:Augustine'sConfessions
    • Carter
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15653

    Close
    • 50100-03
    • RdgGrp:CntmpIsssLglScholarship
    • Witt
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15525

    Close
    • 50100-08
    • RdgGrp:Constitutional Literacy
    • Hansmann
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15651

    Close
    • 50100-01
    • RdgGrp:Lgl&PltclSysScienceFict
    • Chua
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14671

    Close
    • 50100-05
    • RdgGrp:ProgrssvSchlrshpWrkshp
    • Siegel
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15555

    Close
    • 50100-09
    • RdgGrp:Race&Gender in the Law
    • Onwuachi-Willig
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15652

    Close
    • 50100-06
    • RdgGrp:SocialTheoriesInfoSocie
    • Balkin
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15649

    Close
    • 20645-01
    • Reason and Passion in the Law
    • Sachs
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Reason and Passion in the Law (20645). 2 units. Should a judge seek, in the words of Roberts CJ, to be like a baseball umpire, a mechanical instrrument of pure, detached reason? Or should a judge acknowledge, as did Brennan J, that she or he has an active personality on the Bench that should be conscientiously imbued with passion [human empathy]? The course will offer reflections on the actual processes involved in judging, and look at landmark cases heard by South Africa's first Constitutional Court on: terrorism and torture; social and economic rights; the truth commission and restorative justice; same-sex marriages; and whether the law has a sense of humor. Using the U.S. Supreme Court as a counterpoint, the class will examine the inextricable, if at times baffling, link between reason and passion in the law. The seminars will take place during the first half of the term. Paper required. A. Sachs.

    Note: This class will meet on the following days: September 3, 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23, 29, 30; October 6, 7, 14, 15. the first and last class meetings will be on Wednesday (September 3 and October 15); all other classes will be on Monday or Tuesday; all at 4:10-6 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Mon)
    SLB - 113 (Tue)
    SLB - M82 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10422

    Close
    • 20299-01
    • [The] Regulation of Financial Institutions and Activities after the Financial Crisis
    • Rosenberg
    • Tue 4:10 PM-7:10 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] Regulation of Financial Institutions and Activities after the Financial Crisis (20299). 3 units. The Dodd-Frank Act, signed by President Obama on July 21, 2010, undoubtedly represents the most significant change to regulation of the U.S. financial system since the aftermath of the Great Depression. Sown from the seeds of the global financial crisis, Dodd-Frank dramatically changes the rules of the game for financial institutions and other market participants. Understanding the fundamental changes currently underway in the financial system is critical for those who will work at financial institutions or serve as their counsel.

    This course, meant for both law school students and business school students, will explore the origins of Dodd-Frank in the financial crisis, the legislative process that formed Dodd-Frank, the overhaul of the financial regulatory system embedded in Dodd-Frank’s 848 pages and the work regulators have been doing to implement these changes. In addition to exploring the legal and regulatory underpinnings, it will also focus on the market response to these changes and describe how doing business in certain financial instruments today differs significantly from before the financial crisis.

    There are no prerequisites for this course. For the final class, students will be divided into groups and asked to present on their views of a regulation proposed, but not yet finalized, by regulators. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also MGT 642a. G.D. Rosenberg.

    Note: This course will follow the School of Management calendar.

    Location: EVANS - 4400 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10659
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20288-01
    • [The] Law and Regulation of Securities and Financial Markets
    • Macey
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2 to 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] Law and Regulation of Securities and Financial Markets (20288). 2 or 3 units. This course will consider the regulation of the process of raising capital from investors in public offerings and private placements of such securities that is governed primarily by the Securities Act of 1933 (Securities Act). The course will also consider the regulation of trading and trading venues that is governed primarily by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act). Particular attention will be paid to stock market manipulation and insider trading, as well as to issues of market structure. The course will consider the nature and purpose of the legal obligations, particularly the obligations to make disclosure of "material" information that are assumed by participants in the securities markets in various contexts. The system of integrated disclosure, the definition and role "due diligence" by purchasers and sellers of securities, various exemptions from the provisions of the rules, also will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to the roles of the investors who buy securities, the companies that issue securities and to the underwriters (investment bankers), lawyers, and accountants involved in the process. The course will consider the role of the Securities and Exchange Commission in regulating the capital markets and the participants in such markets. The ways that securities laws and regulations, including various provisions of the Securities Act and the Exchange Act and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, affect the corporate governance, strategic planning and general business practices of U.S. companies also will be a topic of discussion. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. J.R. Macey.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10406
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 20627-01
    • Social Science in Law
    • Tyler
    • Mon 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Social Science in Law (20627). 3 units. This class is an introduction to the use of social science in law. Three general topics will be considered. First, the use of social science evidence in adjudication. This will include eyewitness identification; lie detection; and other types of evidence. The second topic is decision making. How do judges and juries make their decisions? Finally, the course will examine the use of social science evidence to make substantive law ("Legislative facts"). This includes the use of evidence on integration and obscenity. Across all these areas the use that legal authorities make of social science "facts" is reviewed and evaluated. Enrollment will be capped at twenty-five. Self-scheduled examination (web) or paper option. Also PSYC 646a. T. Tyler.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10430
    Exam: 1/06/2015 - 1/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8 hour(s)
    Notes: Self-scheduled Exam: You may take this exam at any time during the examination period, either through YLS ExamWeb or by signing out the questions from the Registrar's Office.

    Use your Exam ID.

    Close
    • 13001-01
    • Torts I
    • Grewal
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
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    Location: ASH40 - A422 (Thu)
    ASH40 - A422 (Fri)
    ASH40 - A005 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11673
    Exam: 1/06/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 121
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.
    Use your Exam ID.

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    • 13001-02
    • Torts I
    • Witt
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 11:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    SLB - 110 (Thu)
    ASH40 - A005 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11674
    Exam: 1/06/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 122
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your Exam ID.

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    • 13001-A
    • Torts I
    • Calabresi
    • Mon 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Tue 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Thu 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Fri 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 127 (Mon)
    SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11671
    Exam: 1/06/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

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    • 13001-B
    • Torts I
    • Kysar
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 127 (Wed)
    SLB - 127 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 11672
    Exam: 1/06/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 120
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination, Answers Only: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, and in the assigned room. You may upload your answers to YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your Exam ID.

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    • 20096-01
    • Trusts and Estates
    • Langbein
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    *Trusts and Estates (20096). 4 units. An introductory course treating the various means of gratuitous transfer of wealth by will, by lifetime transfers, and by intestacy: (1) the policy bases of inheritance and the changing patterns of intergenerational wealth transfer; (2) probate administration and procedure; (3) guardianship and custodial regimes for minors and for the infirm; (4) health-care decision making and the “right to die”; (5) intestate succession; (6) the common will substitutes: gift, joint account, joint tenancy, life insurance, pension account, revocable trust; (7) spousal protection and community property; (8) the growing federal interference, especially ERISA preemption; (9) capacity problems and will contests; (10) the requirements for executing and revoking wills; (11) distinctive constructional doctrines of the law of gratuitous transfers; (12) the creation and termination of trusts; (13) the duties of trustees, executors, and other fiduciaries; (14) trust investment law; (15) charitable trusts and charitable corporations; and (16) basic features of federal and state transfer and inheritance taxation. Throughout the course the relevant portions of the Uniform Probate Code, the Uniform Trust Code, and the Restatements (Third) of Trusts and Property will be studied. Scheduled examination (web). J.H. Langbein.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10399
    Exam: 1/06/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.5 hour(s)
    Notes: Scheduled Examination: ExamWeb: You must take this exam on the scheduled date, at the scheduled time, either in the assigned room or through YLS ExamWeb.

    Use your exam ID.

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    • 20594-01
    • Warren Burger's Supreme Court
    • Graetz
      Greenhouse
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
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    Warren Burger's Supreme Court (20594). 2 units. Warren Burger was Chief Justice of the United States from 1969 until 1986 -- a period when the country moved sharply to the right. Histories of the period tend to treat the Burger Court as standing apart from this transformation. Indeed, the 1970s as a whole are often treated as a period of historical pause during which nothing happened. But the Burger Court in fact played a central role in shaping crucial features of the nation we live in today. This seminar will reexamine the period, exploring the Burger years through cases and other primary and secondary readings. Among the topics covered will be race, economic rights, women's rights (including reproductive rights), religion, immigration, crime, and presidential power. Paper required. M.J. Graetz and L. Greenhouse.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10379

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    • 20659-01
    • †Written Advocacy and Legal Research
    • Messing
      Krishnaswami
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    †Written Advocacy and Legal Research (20659). 3 units. This course will train students to conduct efficient legal research and to produce strong written work. To improve students’ legal writing, the class will review trial motions, appellate briefs, and advice from judges. The course will also expose students to organizational strategies, stylistic principles, and forms of legal analysis and persuasion. To improve students’ research skills, the class will focus on how to research secondary sources, case law, statutes, and regulatory materials. The course will expose students to a variety of electronic resources as well as to powerful search strategies and information-management techniques. Students will learn how to research legal issues, frame legal arguments, and analyze legal problems. In-class exercises will help students to develop their research and writing abilities. Students will also complete several longer assignments outside of class. To reflect the realities of modern practice and to facilitate peer-learning, students will work as part of a team on some of the assignments. Students should bring a laptop to all classes. N. Messing and J. G. Krishnaswami.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10409

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