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Courses: Spring 2017 Expand

    • 30129-01
    • Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Seminar
    • Ahmad
      Wishnie
      Orihuela
      Loyo
      Mukherjee
    • Thu 1:05 PM-1:55 PM
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Seminar (30129). 1 unit, credit/fail. A weekly seminar session only for returning students. Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork is a co-requisite. Students enrolled in the seminar section must also be enrolled in the fieldwork section. Prerequisite: Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.I. Ahmad, M.J. Wishnie, R. Loyo, E. Mukherjee, and M. Orihuela.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections. Students who are accepted in the seminar will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20186

    Close
    • 30125-01
    • Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Seminar
    • Wishnie
      Wenzloff
      Kuzma
      Lado
    • Mon 1:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Seminar (30125). 1 unit, credit/fail. A weekly seminar session only for returning students. Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork is a co-requisite; students enrolled in the seminar must also be enrolled in the fieldwork section. Prerequisite: Veterans Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, M.R. Kuzma, M.E. Lado, and A. Wenzloff.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections. Students who are accepted in the seminar section will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.
    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20182

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    • 30228-01
    • Advanced Arbitration and Administrative Law Project
    • Ayres
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Arbitration and Administrative Law Project (30228). 1 unit, credit/fail. Open only to students who have completed Arbitration and Administrative Law Project and taken on significant continuing responsibilities in the project. Permission of the instructor required. I. Ayres.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25509

    Close
    • 30145-01
    • Advanced Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Seminar
    • Gohara
    • Fri 2:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Seminar (30145). 1 unit. Open only to J.D. students who have completed the Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Seminar and Fieldwork. The advanced seminar and fieldwork sections must be taking simultaneously. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. M. Gohara.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list the seminar section (Law 30145) as their lowest priority among experiential course selections. It is not necessary to list the fieldwork section among these selections; students who are accepted in the seminar will automatically be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24023

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    • 21570-01
    • American Environmentalism
    • Galperin
    • Wed 1:00 PM-2:20 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    American Environmentalism (21570). 1 unit. What is environmentalism? The purpose of this seminar is to rigorously discuss that question and use our answers to better understand why we work to protect the environment, with a constant focus on what diverse environmental perspectives mean for environmental policy and law. This course will focus on the tools and tactics of environmental protection, but also on the values that drive environmentalism. This course will, in part, trace the history of environmentalism, study campaign techniques, and analyze environmental laws, but we will look at these issues in the broader context of what it means to be an environmentalist. Through our discussions we will try to construct a vision of effective and lasting environmentalism for the present and the future while challenging ourselves to think about our own values and theories of change; about why we entered this field in the first place. Two reading response papers and class participation required. Also F&ES 627b. J. Galperin.

    Note: This course will meet according to the calendar of the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

    Location: S - 41C (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24028

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    • 30225-01
    • Arbitration and Administrative Law Project
    • Ayres
    • 1
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (25)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Arbitration and Administrative Law Project (30225). 1 unit, credit/fail. The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection provides residents with the option to resolve disputes regarding Connecticut’s New Car Lemon Law Program and the Lottery Delinquency Assessment process through arbitration. Training will concern the substantive dispute areas, administrative procedures, as well as rules of ethics. Students will oversee and resolve contested cases as arbitrators and hearing officers for oral hearings. The course is designed to allow students to apply Connecticut law to facts in unresolved disputes and draft and render initial decisions describing their findings of facts, conclusions of law, and any applicable orders. Enrollment limited to twenty-five. Permission of the instructor required. I. Ayres.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 23261

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    • 21312-01
    • Copyright Law Workshop
    • Klevorick
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Copyright Law Workshop (21312). 1 unit, credit/fail or graded at the student's option. This workshop will consider current topics in copyright law based on papers and presentations by leading scholars and practitioners in the field. The class will meet from 4:10 to 6:00 p.m. on the following Thursday afternoons: January 26, February 9 and 23, March 9 and 30, and April 13. Students will receive one unit of ungraded credit for reading the material assigned for each session, submitting in advance of each session a question about the assigned material, and attending and participating in each meeting of the workshop. Students who wish to receive one graded credit for the course must, in addition, submit brief reaction papers for four of the presentations. Law School rules require that a student choose between the credit/fail and graded options no later than 4:30 p.m. on Friday, February 3rd. Enrollment limited to twelve. A.K. Klevorick.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 25281

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    • 21193-01
    • Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events
    • Metcalf
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events (21193). 1 unit, credit/fail. Conducted in workshop format and led by Hope Metcalf, Executive Director of the Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights, the course will examine contemporary issues in human rights practice and theory. Guest speakers, including scholars, advocates and journalists, will present each week on a diverse range of topics in human rights. Expected topics this term will include refugees and displaced persons, the global supply chain and labor violations, the rise of state suppression of free speech, religion and human rights, and the human rights implicatins of the incoming U.S. administration. Readings are generally distributed in advance of each session. Students enrolled in the workshop for one unit of ungraded credit will prepare short response papers before several of the sessions and be responsible for asking the speaker a question at each of those sessions. The workshop will meet approximately every other week. H.R. Metcalf.

    Location: SLB - FAC-LOUNGE (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 24056

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    • 21041-01
    • Law, Economics, and Organization
    • Jolls
    • Thu 4:10 PM-5:40 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Law, Economics, and Organization (21041). 1 unit, credit/fail. This seminar will meet jointly with the Law, Economics, and Organization Workshop, an interdisciplinary faculty workshop that brings to Yale Law School scholars, generally from other universities, who present papers based on their current research. The topics will involve a broad range of issues of general legal and social science interest. Students registering for the seminar and participating in the workshop will receive one unit of ungraded credit per term. Neither Substantial Paper nor Supervised Analytic Writing credit will be available through the seminar. Short reaction papers will be required during the term. Please email Professor Jolls for further information and to be admitted to the seminar; please note, however, that a formal statement of interest or background is not necessary. C. Jolls.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20115

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    • 21781-01
    • Lobbying
    • Messing
    • Tue 6:10 PM-7:00 PM
    • 1
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Lobbying (21781). 1 unit. Law school focuses on advocacy within the court system; in contrast, lobbying—the often-maligned sibling of litigation—focuses on advocacy within legislatures and rulemaking bodies. But both litigation and lobbying, at their core, involve efforts to persuade governmental decisionmakers to achieve positive results for clients. And both, in their noblest forms, attempt to shape the law for the better. This course explores lobbying: it will focus on how lobbyists—at both for-profit and non-profit groups—influence legislation, drawing on the insights of academic research, active lobbyists, and elected officials. The course will also discuss the history of the field, the professionalization of the field, the laws governing lobbyists, and other ways that lobbyists achieve their goals (such as launching public relations campaigns and pushing legislators to hold hearings). The course will provide students with a more fulsome understanding of how to navigate and influence the legislative process. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. N. Messing.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20201
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30178-01
    • Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project
    • Gerken
      Nardini
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (30178). 1 unit, with the option of additional units. This course will introduce students to local government lawyering. Working directly with attorneys from the Affirmative Litigation Task Force in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, students will have an opportunity to brainstorm about potential projects, research the most promising ideas for lawsuits, assist in filing a case, or help litigate one already underway. The course will address both theoretical issues (What roles should cities play in our democracy? Can cities further the public interest through litigation?) and practical ones (city-state relations, standing issues). The first part of the course will acquaint students with broader legal and policy issues associated with affirmative litigation. The students will then break into independent working groups organized by subject area; the working groups will be designed to accommodate student interests and preferences. Each working group will either develop and propose a potential lawsuit, or assist in one of the City’s ongoing affirmative litigation cases. Students joining in the fall are expected to make a one-year commitment (both fall and spring semesters). In addition, students enrolling in this course for the first time in Fall 2016 must complete their one-year commitment in the course to receive professional responsibility credit. The ethics component of the clinic will be taught during the fall term.Permission of the instructors required. H. Gerken and T.M. Nardini.

    Course Selection: List this clinic among the experiential course selections. If you would like to enroll, please submit one paragraph on why you are interested in local government work as well as your resume by December 8, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20097

    Close
    • 50100-01
    • RdgGrp: AI &Legal Implications
    • Balkin
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25394

    Close
    • 50100-02
    • RdgGrp: Animal Protection Law
    • Kysar
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25395

    Close
    • 50100-03
    • RdgGrp: Chevron v. Ecuador
    • Koh
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25396

    Close
    • 50100-04
    • RdgGrp: Education Law & Policy
    • Forman
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25397

    Close
    • 50100-05
    • RdgGrp: Executive Power
    • Priest
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25398

    Close
    • 50100-06
    • RdgGrp: Visual Jurisprudence
    • Balkin
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25536

    Close
    • 50100-16
    • RdgGrp: Wine Law
    • Macey
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25535

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    • 50100-07
    • RdgGrp:AccntbltyHumnRghtsSyria
    • Metcalf
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25399

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    • 50100-08
    • RdgGrp:CanadianConstitutinlLaw
    • Koh
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25400

    Close
    • 50100-17
    • RdgGrp:Dscrmntn,Algrthms,Prvcy
    • Balkin
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25537

    Close
    • 50100-09
    • RdgGrp:Efficient PracticeofLaw
    • Eskridge
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25401

    Close
    • 50100-10
    • RdgGrp:EnforcingInternatnl Law
    • Hathaway
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25402

    Close
    • 50100-11
    • RdgGrp:Foundations Private Law
    • Schwartz
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25403

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    • 50100-12
    • RdgGrp:GenderEqualty&LglPrfssn
    • Chua
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25404

    Close
    • 50100-20
    • RdgGrp:Health&FoodLawSchlrshp
    • Gluck
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25731

    Close
    • 50100-15
    • RdgGrp:HeterodoxApproachesLaw
    • Shapiro
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25534

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    • 50100-19
    • RdgGrp:Intention&PhilofCrimLaw
    • Yaffe
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25539

    Close
    • 50100-13
    • RdgGrp:LglLitConstrctnsAsianAm
    • Ahmad
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25393

    Close
    • 50100-14
    • RdgGrp:LwyrngSpnishCommunities
    • Wishnie
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25405

    Close
    • 50100-18
    • RdgGrp:Technology Law & Policy
    • Balkin
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25538

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    • 21486-01
    • Research Methods in American Law
    • Jefferson
      Eiseman
      Kellett
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 1
    • Partial Satisfaction of Skills Requirement
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Research Methods in American Law (21486). 1 unit, credit/fail. This course, formerly Efficient Techniques in Legal Research, will instruct students in basic legal research skills, including researching federal case law, statutory and administrative law, as well as using secondary sources in the research process. Students will be required to complete a series of short research assignments. The course will meet once weekly for the first half of the term. The skills requirement may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1 unit legal research course. Minimum enrollment of five required. J. Jefferson, J. Eiseman, and C. Kellett.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20113

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    • 21493-01
    • Research Methods in Statutory and Regulatory Law
    • Krishnaswami
      VanderHeijden
      Matheson
    • Wed 3:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 1
    • Partial Satisfaction of Skills Requirement
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Research Methods in Statutory and Regulatory Law (21493). 1 unit, credit/fail. This course will teach students to research statutes, agency regulations, agency cases, and other sources of statutory and administrative law, using a variety of print and online sources. The goal of the course is to give students an understanding of the sophisticated research skills required for finding statutory and administrative authority in its various forms including: legislative history, enabling statutes, proposed and final agency regulations, decisions, opinions and policy and executive orders. Emphasis will be on researching using free, government resources, but students will also learn how to conduct regulatory research using directories and other databases. Although the primary focus of this course will be on researching federal statutory and administrative law, one class session will be devoted to researching state and local administrative law. Students will be evaluated based on class participation and on a final research project focused on a regulatory issue and agency of their choosing. The skills requirement may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1-unit legal research course. This course will meet weekly for seven weeks in the first half of the term. J. Graves-Krishnaswami, S. Matheson, and M. VanderHeijden.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20122

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    • 21489-01
    • Specialized Legal Research in Corporate Law
    • Eiseman
      VanderHeijden
    • Wed 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
    • 1
    • Partial Satisfaction of Skills Requirement
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Specialized Legal Research in Corporate Law (21489). 1 unit, credit/fail. This course will introduce students to legal research, focused on corporate law research in a law firm setting. Secondary sources and research techniques specific to the practice of corporate law will be covered. Research topics may include transactional legal research, current awareness, form finding and document construction, corporate and non-profit governance, practitioner’s tools, business and market research, competitive intelligence, financial analysis, regulatory research, and other relevant areas based on student interest. Students will be required to complete a series of in-class assignments. The course will meet once weekly for the first half of the term. The skills requirement may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1-unit legal research course. Minimum enrollment of five. J. Eiseman and M. VanderHeijden.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20196

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    • 30141-01
    • Temporary Restraining Order Project
    • Wizner
      Frontis
      Messali
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Temporary Restraining Order Project (30141). 1 unit, credit/fail. The Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) Project is a field placement program in which law students provide assistance to domestic violence victims applying for Temporary Restraining Orders in the Superior Court for the New Haven Judicial District, under the supervision of attorneys from the New Haven Legal Assistance Association and the Court Clerk’s Office. The TRO Project aims to increase access to justice for self-represented parties and provide opportunities for law students to learn about the law of domestic violence and court procedures for protecting individuals in abusive relationships. Students will be able to develop practical skills, including intake, interviewing, drafting of affidavits and other application documents, informing applicants about court procedures, and assisting applicants in navigating the judicial process. Open only to J.D. students. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. S. Wizner, C. Frontis, and E. Messali .


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 24177

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    • 30163-01
    • Advanced Education Adequacy Project
    • Rosen
      Knopp
      Moodhe
    • 1 to 3
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Education Adequacy Project (30163). 1 to 3 units. Open only to students who have completed Education Adequacy Project. Permission of the instructors required. D. Rosen, A. Knopp, J.P. Moodhe, and A. Taubes.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20252

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    • 30120-01
    • Advanced Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic
    • Gentes
    • 1 to 3
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic (30120). 1 to 3 units. Open only to students who have completed the Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. J. Gentes.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 26013

    Close
    • 30138-01
    • Advanced Advocacy for Children and Youth Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Peters
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Advocacy for Children and Youth Clinic: Fieldwork (30138). 1 to 3 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Advocacy for Children and Youth Clinic: Seminar and Fieldwork. Permission of the instructors required. J.K. Peters.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 21697

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    • 30102-01
    • Advanced Advocacy for Children and Youth Clinic: Seminar
    • Peters
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Advocacy for Children and Youth Clinic: Seminar (30102). 1 unit, credit/fail. Open only to students who have completed Advocacy for Children and Youth Clinic Seminar and Fieldwork. Permission of the instructors required. J.K. Peters.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20150

    Close
    • 30132-01
    • Advanced Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork (30132). 1 to 3 units. Open only to students who have completed the Community and Economic Development Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar and C.F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest preference among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20132

    Close
    • 30104-01
    • Advanced Community and Economic Development Clinic: Seminar
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Community and Economic Development Clinic: Seminar (30104) and Fieldwork (30132). The seminar is 1 unit, credit/fail; the fieldwork section is 1-3 units, graded. Open only to students who have completed the Community and Economic Development Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar and C.F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest preference among experiential course selections Students who elect both the seminar and the fieldwork options should list each as their two lowest preferences.

    Note: The seminar meeting time will be determined once students' schedules have been settled and a coordinated time can be arranged.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; or Temporary Restraining Order Project.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20131

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    • 30142-01
    • Advanced Immigration Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Peters
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Immigration Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork (30142). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. Open only to students who have completed Immigration Legal Services Clinic:Seminar and Fieldwork. Permission of the instructor required. J.K. Peters.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same term, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 21696

    Close
    • 30114-01
    • Advanced Immigration Legal Services Clinic: Seminar
    • Peters
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Immigration Legal Services Clinic: Seminar (30114). 1 unit, credit/fail. Open only to students who have completed Immigration Legal Services Clinic: Seminar and Fieldwork. Permission of instructor required. J.K. Peters.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.

    Note: Due to our immediate commitments to our clients, Professor Peters will finalize the roster by email before the first class, after which the clinic cannot be dropped.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20152

    Close
    • 30117-01
    • Advanced Legal Services for Immigrant Communities
    • Wizner
    • 1 to 3
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (1)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Services for Immigrant Communities (30117). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail. Open only to students who have taken Legal Services for Immigrant Communities. Open only to J.D. students. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to one. S. Wizner.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20137

    Close
    • 30189-01
    • Advanced Open Government and Open Data Governance Clinic
    • Noveck
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Open Government and Open Data Governance Clinic (30189). 1 to 3 units. Open only to students who have completed the Open Government andn Open Data Governance Clinic and who wish to continue to work on projects. Permission of the instructor required. B. Noveck.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24014

    Close
    • 21179-01
    • Chinese Law and Policy: Independent Research
    • Gewirtz
      Horsley
      Williams
      Han
      Webster
      Longarino
    • Wed 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Chinese Law and Policy: Independent Research (21179). 1 to 3 units. Students will undertake independent research and writing related to legal and policy reform in China or U.S.-China relations. Paper required. Permission of the instructors required. P. Gewirtz, S. L. Han, J.P. Horsley, D. Longarino, G. Webster, and R.D. Williams.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest by the close of bidding at 4:30 pm on December 8. The statements should include an explanation of your background related to China and research projects you are considering.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20243

    Close
    • 21156-01
    • Law and Macroeconomics
    • Listokin
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Law and Macroeconomics (21156). 1 to 3 units. This seminar will examine the interaction between law and macroeconomic fluctuations, with an emphasis on the "Great Recession." Unlike conventional law and economics, the seminar assumes that aggregate demand plays an important role in determining output. Topics include regulation as a determinant of aggregate demand, the income tax code and government spending as determinants of aggregate demand, and Central Banks' legal authority to conduct unconventional monetary policy. Students who write papers will earn additional units. Enrollment limited. Y. Listokin.

    Location: SLB - FAC-DINING (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20136

    Close
    • 21097-01
    • Medical Legal Partnerships
    • Gluck
      Ezer
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Medical Legal Partnerships (21097). 1 to 3 units. This course will explore the challenges and benefits of medical legal partnerships (MLPs), with a particular focus on the five MLPs currently operating in New Haven. Enrollment is at the discretion of the instructor and dedicated work in a New Haven MLP is a co-requisite. Students will complete scholarly papers and meet to discuss both academic writings and the legal and operational challenges of MLPs. Meeting times to be arranged but all students will be required to attend a one-day conference at the Law School on Friday, March 3, to receive credit. Paper required. Permission of the instructor required. A.R. Gluck and T. Ezer.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24221

    Close
    • 30192-01
    • Advanced Legal Assistance
    • Dineen
    • 1 to 4
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Assistance (30192). 1 to 4 units, credit/fail. Open only to students who have completed Legal Assistance. Permission of the instructor required. F.X. Dineen.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 24225

    Close
    • 30176-01
    • Advanced Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic
    • Schulz
      Balkin
      Langford
      Bloch-Wehba
    • 1 to 4
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic (30176). 1 to 4 units, credit/fail or graded at student option. Prerequisite: Open only to students who have completed two semesters of the Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic. Paper option. Permission of the instructors required. D. Schulz, J.M. Balkin, H. Bloch-Wehba, J.T. Langford.

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students.

    Course Bidding: Students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 24192

    Close
    • 30179-01
    • Advanced San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project
    • Gerken
      Nardini
    • 1 to 4
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced SFALP (30179). 1 to 4 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. Open only to those students who have completed Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project. Permission of the instructors required. H. Gerken and T.M. Nardini.

    Course Selection: Continuing students should list this section as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20099

    Close
    • 30126-01
    • Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Wishnie
      Wenzloff
      Kuzma
      Lado
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork (30126). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. Students may enroll in the fieldwork section without enrolling in the seminar section. Prerequisite: Veterans Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, M.R. Kuzma, M.E. Lado, and A. Wenzloff.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20183

    Close
    • 30130-01
    • Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Ahmad
      Wishnie
      Orihuela
      Loyo
      Mukherjee
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork (30130). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. Students may elect to take the fieldwork section without enrolling in the advanced seminar section.Prerequisite: Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.I. Ahmad, M.J. Wishnie, R. Loyo, E. Mukherjee, and M. Orihuela.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20187

    Close
    • 30165-01
    • Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic
    • Galperin
      Suatoni
      Hawkins
    • 1 to 4
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic (30165). 1 to 4 units. Open only to students who have successfully completed the Environmental Protection Clinic. Students who complete this section for two or more units may satisfy the Professional Responsibility or Legal Skills requirement. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited. J. Galperin, D. Hawkins, and L. Suatoni.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20086

    Close
    • 30202-01
    • Advanced Legal Assistance: Reentry Clinic
    • Eppler-Epstein
      Shaffer
    • 1 to 4
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Assistance Reentry Clinic (30202). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. Open only to students who have completed the Legal Assistance Reentry Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. A. Eppler-Epstein and E. Shaffer.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20239

    Close
    • 30203-01
    • Advanced Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic Fieldwork
    • Bhandary-Alexander
      Blank
    • 1 to 4
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Assistance Clinic: Immigrant Rights: Fieldwork (30203). 1 to 4 units, credit/fail with graded option at student's choice. Open only to students who have completed Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic. Open only to JD students. Permission of the instructors required. J. Bhandary-Alexander and D. Blank.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20195

    Close
    • 21779-01
    • Addiction and the Law: Perspectives from Philosophy, Economics, and Neuroscience
    • Yaffe
      Schwartz
      Kober
      Moore
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission (15)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Addiction and the Law: Perspectives from Philosophy, Economics, and Neuroscience (21779). 2 units. This course will concern the bearing of addiction on various forms of treatment under the law, including but not limited to the criminal liability of addicts. The course will address this broad set of issues through consideration of the import for the law of philosophical, economic and neuroscientific conceptions of the nature of addiction. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Also PHIL 744b and PSYC 609b. G. Yaffe, A. Schwartz, M. Moore, and H. Kober.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, student should submit a CV and a statement of interest by December 8 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20189

    Close
    • 30143-01
    • Advanced Juvenile Justice Clinic: Seminar
    • Birckhead
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Juvenile Justice Clinic: Seminar (30143). 2 units. Open only to students who have completed the Juvenile Justice Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. T. Birckhead.

    Course Bidding:Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections. Students who bid on and are accepted in the seminar portion of the clinic will be automatically enrolled in the fieldwork section. Students do not need to bid on the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23654

    Close
    • 30181-01
    • Advanced Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic
    • Greenhouse
      Pincus
      Rothfeld
      Kimberly
      Hughes
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Supreme Court Advocacy (30181). 4 units (2 fall, 2 spring). Open only to students who were enrolled during the fall semester. Permission of the instructors required. L. Greenhouse, P. Hughes, M. Kimberly, A. Pincus, and C. Rothfeld.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest choice among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20108

    Close
    • 21323-01
    • Advanced Laws of War: Evidence from War Manifestos
    • Hathaway
      Shapiro
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Laws of War: Evidence from War Manifestos (21323). 2 units, credit/fail. Permission of the instructors required. O. Hathaway and S.J. Shapiro.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25903

    Close
    • 30223-01
    • Advanced Issues in Capital Markets:Role of Counsel forIssuers&Underwriters inInitialPublicOffering
    • Brod
      Fleisher
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (15)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Issues in Capital Markets: Role of Counsel for Issuers and Underwriters in an Initial Public Offering (30223). 2 units. This advanced securities law seminar will provide insights into the lawyer’s participation in the capital markets practice. The organizing principle will be the role of counsel for issuers and underwriters in the execution of an initial public offering (“IPO”) registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) pursuant to the Securities Act of 1933, which will drive consideration of a wide range of legal and practical issues (including related issues under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934).

    The sessions will be oriented around the key steps required at each stage of the IPO process. Students will read primarily transaction documents (e.g., registration statements; underwriting agreements; etc.) drawn from actual IPOs, supplemented by PowerPoint presentations and memoranda prepared by the instructors, as well as SEC materials, accounting literature, and treatise excerpts. Reading materials will be tailored in scope, with a focus on facilitating each session’s discussion and course assignments. Additional materials also will be provided for further, optional reading where desired and to provide useful reference tools for future practice. Students will engage in drafting exercises, in-class analysis and mock negotiations (including negotiation of an underwriting agreement). The course will also focus on certain key transaction management skills, including in respect of “situational judgment.” Guest speakers from the investment banking and corporate communities will be invited for special sessions to present their perspectives on the IPO process and legal/business capital markets issues more generally. Grading will be based on performance on experiential assignments and class participation. The first session of the course will include an overview of the U.S. federal securities law regulatory framework. This will serve as an important refresher for those who already have studied securities regulation (which is encouraged) and as a basic foundation for those who may not yet have extensive knowledge of the topic. Enrollment limited to twenty (fifteen Law and five SOM). Permission of the instructors required. Also MGT 662b. C. B. Brod and A.E. Fleisher.

    Note: Students will be able to drop the course in accordance with standard YLS policies.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20241

    Close
    • 30200-01
    • Advanced Appellate Litigation Project
    • Duke
      Daniels
      Dooley
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Appellate Litigation Project (30200). 5 units (3 fall, 2 spring), graded . Open only to students who have completed the fall-term section, Appellate Litigation Project. Permission of instructors required. S.B. Duke, B. Daniels, and T. Dooley.

    Nature of Credits: The credits for this course can qualify as either "professional responsibility" or "experiential" but not as both for the same credits. Each student may elect which of those characterization may be allocated to each course credit. If no election is make to the Registrar before the end of the term in which the student is enrolled in the course, all credits shall be presumed to be "experiential."

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as their lowest preference among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20066

    Close
    • 30146-01
    • Advanced Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Gohara
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Fieldwork (30146). 2 units. Open only to J.D. students who have completed the Challenging Mass Incarcertaion Clinic (seminar and fieldwork). The advanced sections must be taken simultaneously. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. M. Gohara.

    Course Bidding: Bid only on the seminar section of the advanced clinic (LAW 30145);students who are accepted in the seminar will be automatically enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24024

    Close
    • 30108-01
    • Advanced Criminal Justice Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Doherty
      Ullmann
      Orihuela
    • 2
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Criminal Justice Clinic: Fieldwork (30108). 2 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. F.M. Doherty, M. Orihuela, and T. Ullmann.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24239

    Close
    • 30144-01
    • Advanced Juvenile Justice Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Birckhead
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Juvenile Justice Clinic: Fieldwork (30144). 2 units. Open only to students who have completed the Juvenile Justice Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. T. Birckhead.

    Course Bidding: Students who bid on and are accepted in the seminar portion of the clinic will be automatically enrolled in the fieldwork section. Students do not need to bid on the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23684

    Close
    • 30212-01
    • Advocacy in International Arbitration
    • Buckley
      Mahoney
      Landy
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (12)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advocacy in International Arbitration (30212). 2 units. International arbitration is a growing field and increasingly is the mechanism by which the largest international commercial disputes are resolved. This course has two primary aims: (1) to expose students to this area of legal practice; and (2) to provide them with the skills they need to represent clients effectively in international commercial arbitrations. The course is built around a series of exercises that track major stages in the arbitral process, culminating in an evidentiary hearing during which students will present argument and examine witnesses. At each stage of the process, instructors will provide feedback and insights based on their experience dealing with the very same factual scenarios the students will encounter during the mock exercises. In addition to the in-class exercises, there will be a series of short lectures and discussions about key strategic and procedural issues in international commercial arbitration. There will be no paper or final exam, but students will be required to complete a series of written exercises and participate in oral arguments. Enrollment limited to twelve. J. J. Buckley, Jr., J. Landy, and C.J. Mahoney.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20247

    Close
    • 30188-01
    • Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project
    • Metcalf
      Mukherjee
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (8)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project (30188). 2 units, credit/fail. The Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project (ASAP) at the Urban Justice Center represents refugee families crossing the U.S.-Mexico border to flee life-threatening conditions. ASAP uses innovative methods to bring legal aid services to places where there are few or no legal aid lawyers, including border detention facilities and rural communities across the United States. The two-hour weekly seminar will offer students an opportunity to reflect on their learning, collaborate with their peers, and understand the broader context for their work. Classes will cover a range of topics: U.S. asylum law and policy; relevant international law and institutions; political, social, historical, and economic factors underlying the current refugee situation; critical theory relevant to gender, ethnicity, and migration; core skills for client-centered representation; and trauma and secondary trauma. Students will work in teams throughout the semester and handle up to three cases each. Professor Mukherjee will supervise casework associated with the seminar as the attorney of record, in a co-counsel relationship with others, or as a consulting expert. Clients may be located across the United States. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to between eight and twelve. H.R. Metcalf and E. Mukherjee.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should submit a statement of interest (no more than one to two pages) and a CV by 4:30 p.m. on December 8.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 23766

    Close
    • 21761-01
    • Bureaucracy
    • Parrillo
    • Fri 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission (8)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Bureaucracy (21761). 2 units. One of the primary tasks of modern American lawyers is to influence the exercise of bureaucratic power. Further, lawyers in America are often called upon to serve in, or to help design, bureaucratic agencies. The agenda for this seminar is to discuss leading works on government administration -- some classic and some cutting-edge -- from political science, sociology, law, and other disciplines. The kinds of questions we will ask include: Why do some bureaucracies inspire respect and admiration, while others inspire disdain, hatred, and resistance? Why are bureaucrats highly responsive to some stakeholders and callously indifferent to others? What kinds of people self-select into government jobs -- and what kinds of opportunities, dangers, and biases result from that self-selection? What are the most effective strategies for getting the attention of a bureaucracy -- and getting it to change its ways? Should bureaucrats be understood as the servants and agents of politicians, or as politicians in their own right? Does bureaucratic organization embody the rule of law, or threaten it? Do lawsuits against a bureaucracy have any effect on its behavior -- and if so, do they make things better or worse? Students are required to participate actively in each week’s discussion. Grades will be based solely on class participation. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructor required. N. Parrillo.

    Course Bidding Information: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a brief statement of why they wish to take the course (no more than 500 words) by 4:30 p.m. on December 8. The statement may discuss how bureaucracy relates to your academic interests, background, career plans, or anything else you consider relevant to your interest in the subject. In selecting students, the instructor will seek a diversity and balance of perspectives.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20147

    Close
    • 21597-01
    • Capitalism Film Society
    • Priest
    • Tue 4:10 PM-7:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Capitalism Film Society (21597). 2 units, credit/fail. Each week this class will review a film that deals with capitalism. Discussion will be held following the film. Each student will be required to submit a one-to-two page response paper discussing each film. G.L. Priest.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20154

    Close
    • 30135-01
    • Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Seminar
    • Gohara
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic (30135) and Fieldwork (30136). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option for each part (4 units total). The clinic and the fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. For the first time in a generation, there is bipartisan reconsideration of the criminal laws and “tough-on-crime” policies that have led to the imprisonment of over two million people in the United States – what many describe as “mass incarceration.” In the clinic’s seminar students will study the legal, social, and policy factors that contributed to the exponential rise of America’s prison population and consider alternative approaches to punishment. In the field work, students will represent clients in two types of cases: federal sentencing proceedings and Connecticut state parole hearings. Students will learn advocacy strategies aimed at mitigating or ameliorating their clients’ punishment, both prospectively during sentencing and retrospectively during post-conviction proceedings. This work will include: building relationships with clients (some of whom will be incarcerated); interviewing witnesses; investigating case facts; developing case theories; working on interdisciplinary teams alongside expert witnesses; using narrative writing techniques to prepare persuasive pleadings; and developing reentry plans for clients leaving prison. Additionally, students will present oral arguments at their clients’ federal hearings and will prepare state-sentenced clients to testify before the parole board. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment is limited to six. Permission of the instructor required. M. Gohara.

    Course Bidding: Students should bid only on the clinic seminar (LAW 30135). Any student who is accepted in the clinic will automatically be enrolled in the fieldwork section (LAW 30136).

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 24021

    Close
    • 30136-01
    • Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Gohara
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (6)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Fieldwork (30136). 2 units, credit/fail with a graded option. The fieldwork section must be taken simultaneously with the clinic. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to six. Permission of the instructor required. M. Gohara.

    Course Bidding: Students accepted in the clinic will be enrolled in the fieldwork section. It is not necessary to bid on the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 24022

    Close
    • 21387-01
    • Children and the Law: Seminar
    • Dailey
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment (18)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Children and the Law: Seminar (21387). 2 units. This seminar will examine the laws governing children’s lives separate and apart from laws governing adults or persons generally. The focus of study will be on children’s relationships with adults and with other children; adult responsibilities for children as well as children’s responsibilities for themselves; and the rights of both adults and children. Throughout we will give consideration to children’s developmental and psychological capacities, needs and vulnerabilities. Topics will be organized in terms of six interrelated spheres of children’s experience: (1) children’s relationships with caregivers; (2) children’s protection from maltreatment; (3) children’s educational experiences; (4) children’s experiences in the criminal and juvenile justice systems; (5) children’s interactions with the market and civic life, as consumers, workers, and citizens; and (6) children’s peer relationships, including sexual relationships and the reproductive consequences that may flow from such relationships. Paper required. Enrollment capped at eighteen. A. Dailey.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20063

    Close
    • 30131-01
    • Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (8)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork (30131). 2 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. Must be taken in conjunction with the Community and Economic Development Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar and C.F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in the fieldwork section, so there is no need to bid on the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; Temporary Restraining Order Project.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20130

    Close
    • 30103-01
    • Community and Economic Development Clinic: Seminar
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • Tue 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (8)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Community and Economic Development Clinic (30103) and Fieldwork (30131). 2 units, credit/fail or graded at student option, for each section (4 units total). Students must be enrolled in the seminar and fieldwork sections simultaneously. CED explores the role of lawyers and the law in building wealth and opportunity in low-income communities. The clinic focuses on issues of neighborhood revitalization, social entrepreneurship, sustainable development and financial inclusion as they relate to community and economic development. Students in CED represent and partner with community organizations, nonprofits, community development financial institutions, neighborhood associations, and small foundations. These client organizations share an interest in promoting economic opportunity and socioeconomic mobility among low- and moderate-income people.

    Students will represent clients in a range of legal matters including formation and governance of for-profit, not-for-profit and hybrid entities, negotiating and drafting contracts, developing employment and other policies, structuring real estate transactions, resolving zoning and environmental issues, providing tax advice, drafting and advocating for legislation and appearing before administrative agencies. CED engages students in local work which can then be used to inform policy development at the local, state and federal levels. Students will gain skills in client contact, contract drafting, transactional lawyering, legal research and writing, regulatory and legislative advocacy, administrative agency contact and negotiation. The class seminar will meet once a week for two hours and once a week for one hour and will cover federal, state and local policies affecting urban and suburban places; substantive law in tax, real estate development, and corporate governance; and transactional and regulatory lawyering skills, such as negotiating and drafting contracts. Each student will meet with faculty once a week for fieldwork supervision. The clinic is open to students from the Schools of Law, Management, Divinity, Forestry & Environmental Studies, Public Health, and Architecture with prior approval from a faculty member. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar and C.F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should submit a short statement of interest (not to exceed two pages) by 4:30 p.m. on December 8.

    Note: Because client work begins immediately and is subject to professional rules including attorney-client confidentiality, this clinic is not a class that students will have the opportunity to "shop." Admitted students will receive early notice and will be required to confirm their commitment to the clinic before the opening of the add/drop period.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; Temporary Restraining Order Project.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20129

    Close
    • 21520-01
    • Comparative Constitutional Law
    • Sadurski
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Comparative Constitutional Law (21520). 2 units. This course will provide an overview of comparative constitutional law, through reading and discussion of recent scholarship that has helped to define the subject. The emphasis will be on bringing together (a) the main theories of constitutionalism, and critical responses that they triggered; (b) diverse regions that have been the scene of constitution-making in recent decades (Central and Eastern Europe, East Asia, South Africa, Latin and South America), in comparison with more 'consolidated' constitutional systems (US, Western Europe, Australia), and (c) some of the main dimensions of constitutionalism but with a firm focus on the question of judicial review and constitutional rights.

    The first, introductory part of the course (sessions 1 and 2) will be devoted to the very idea of 'constitutionalism' and different approaches to constitutional entrenchment in different systems around the world.

    The second part (sessions 3-6) will look at the question of constitutional review in different systems through the prism of three variants: abstractness, ex ante / ex post, and finality of review. We will also discuss two leading theories of the role of constitutional review in new and consolidated democracies: the theory of 'juristocracy' (Hirschl) and 'the insurance model' of judicial review (Ginsburg).

    The third part (sessions 7-11) will discuss three main questions with which constitutions around the world have to deal: protection of individual rights, designing the rules for constitution making and amending, and identifying the dominant patterns of constitutional interpretation, with special emphasis on proportionality analysis and on the idea of “public reason” as a proposed standard for judging unconstitutional legislative motivations.

    The fourth part (sessions 12-13) will deal with challenges resulting from non-democratic forces, either preceding or questioning democratic constitutionalism; we will discuss "transitional constitutionalism", "militant democracy" as enforced by democratic constitutionalism, and a specially troubling case study of coping with hate speech. The last part (session 14) will discuss so called "supranational constitutionalism" -- a 'translation' of nation-state constitutionalism to the supranational level.

    There will be a set of reading materials with links to electronic resources held by the Law School Library, and one main recommended book: Wojciech Sadurski, Rights before Courts (2nd ed., Springer 2014).

    Assessment: (1) Each student will be expected to write two or three (depending on the total number of students enrolled) “response papers” of 2-3 pages during the term, raising issues for discussion related to the readings (30%). Those papers will have to be submitted by Friday afternoon prior to a session at which they will be discussed. (2) This is a discussion-based seminar, and class participation will be encouraged (20%). Students are required to read the literature prior to each class. (3) There will be a final essay (50%), on a topic of choice (as approved by the lecturer), to be submitted by the end of the examination session (approx. 3000 words). Paper required. W. Sadurski.

    Location: BAKER - A420 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20242

    Close
    • 30198-01
    • Complex Civil Litigation
    • Underhill
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (20)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Complex Civil Litigation (30198). 2 units. This course will focus principally on the issues that can impact the outcome of complex civil cases. Emphasis will be placed on effective practical legal writing, as well as on successful argument techniques and litigation strategies. To a large extent, students will learn by doing; each student will write two briefs and argue those two issues in class. Those briefs will be posted on YLS:Inside and will constitute a part of the weekly reading assignment for the course. Supplemental readings consisting of Supreme Court and Second Circuit decisions will also be assigned weekly.

    The class will be organized into four “law firms” of five students each. Ten of the class sessions will be designated as argument days. Each law firm must assign one student to write a memorandum of law in support of the position (motion or opposition) assigned to the firm and then to argue that position in class. Each student must handle two such assignments over the course of the semester. The briefs and arguments will be based on problems written for this class; there is no casebook for the course.

    The arguments and related discussions will address issues that impact complex civil cases, including: assembling the right parties (joinder, necessary parties), establishing personal jurisdiction through indirect contacts (internet, agency), forum selection (transfer, forum non conveniens), heightened pleading standards (Twombly, PSLRA), discovery in complex cases (electronic discovery, privilege), stays or abstention in favor of related litigation (Colorado River, Rooker-Feldman), multi-district litigation, class action procedures and limitations (class arbitration, CAFA, SLUSA), interlocutory appeals, sanctions, judicial disqualification, and attorneys’ fees.

    Grading will be based principally on the two papers (briefs) submitted by each student. Oral arguments and class discussion will also count. There will be no examination. Substantial Paper credit available. Enrollment capped at twenty. Permission of the instructor required. S.R. Underhill.

    Note: Because this course requires a specific number of students, those who have been accepted will be notified and asked to confirm their intention to remain in the course before classes start, so that students on the waiting list may be offered places before the first class meeting.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20177

    Close
    • 30220-01
    • Compliance: Legal Practicum
    • Garrity-Rokous
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (16)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Compliance: Legal Practicum (30220). 2 units. Lawyers increasingly are expected to guide organizations to identify, assess and comply with legal requirements and demonstrate risk management and governance. At the same time, legal mandates require organizations to protect whistleblowers, while enforcement guidelines induce organizations to self-report violations. In short, compliance constitutes an increasingly dynamic and challenging field for lawyers, one demanding the ability to understand the separate perspectives of regulators, business leaders, consumers, and employees.

    This course will explore the legal, ethical, and policy foundations of compliance: the effort to translate statutory mandates into compliant organizational and individual behavior. This course will seek to meet three objectives: (1) enable students to identify and proactively address potential compliance issues; (2) develop the practical problem-solving skills needed to respond to compliance failures; and (3) provide students with the theoretical and practical tools necessary to advocate on behalf of a company under investigation for a regulatory violation. Enrollment limited to twelve to sixteen. To achieve this objective, the course will employ both simulations and practical case studies, working directly with organizations in the non-profit/public service sectors; the course thus is particularly well-suited for students interested in those sectors, as well as start-up and in-house counsel careers. Permission of the instructor required. G. Garrity-Rokous.

    Note: There will be three dates where the class will meet until 4 p.m. to allow for three weeks when the class will not meet. Dates to be announced.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20246

    Close
    • 21345-01
    • Constitutional Litigation Seminar
    • Calabresi
      Walker
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • limited enrollment (12)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Constitutional Litigation Seminar (21345). 2 units. Federal constitutional adjudication from the vantage of the litigator with an emphasis on Circuit and Supreme Court practice and procedural problems, including jurisdiction, justiciability, exhaustion of remedies, immunities, abstention, and comity. Specific substantive questions of constitutional law currently before the Supreme Court are considered as well. Students will each argue two cases taken from the Supreme Court docket and will write one brief, which may be from that docket, but will likely come from the Second Circuit. Students will also join the faculty members on the bench and will, from time to time, be asked to make brief arguments on very short notice on issues raised in the class. Brief required. Enrollment limited to twelve. G. Calabresi and J.M. Walker, Jr.

    Note: This seminar will meet fourteen times, on January 18, February 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23; March 29, 30; April 5, 6, 12, 13, and 19. The first class meeting will be held on Wednesday, January 18, 4:10-6 p.m., in room 111 at the Law School; thereafter the class meetings will be at 157 Church Street at the same time. Because of the nature of this seminar, admitted students who wish to drop the course must notify the instructors and remove the course from their schedule no later than the first meeting day, following class; all students who are on the admitted list by the end of that day must take the course and will not be permitted subsequently to drop. First day attendance strongly urged. Those students on the waiting list must attend the first class meeting to learn if any places have opened. Beginning on the day following the first meeting day, if places have opened, students on the waiting list who attended the first class meeting will be offered places, in the order in which those students appear on the waiting list. Other waitlisted students may be considered after offers are made to those who attended the first class, should additional openings occur.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20059

    Close
    • 21104-01
    • Contemporary Arab Politics: From Nasserist Statism to the Islamist State
    • Ford
    • Tue 2:30 PM-4:20 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Contemporary Arab Politics: From Nasserist Statism to Islamist State (21104). 2 units. An examination of the key elements of the Arab political order that arose out of colonial rule, the relationship between political and economic interests in Arab countries, the instruments of control and repression and the problems with rule of law, and the emerging elements of a new political order in countries that have suffered upheaval. The course will highlight tribal sectarian politics in Arab countries, the role of political Islam and competition between Sunni and Shia communities as well as the ideology of Islamic extremism and factors facilitating its spread. the course will conclude with an examination of the role and limits of American influence in the Arab world now. Paper required. Enrollment limited to four Law students. Permission of the instructor required. Also GLBL 685b. R.S. Ford.

    Note: This course will meet according to the Graduate School calendar.

    Location: WTS - A42 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24275

    Close
    • 30215-01
    • Corporate Crisis Management
    • Trevino
      Coleman
      Wiseman
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (16)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Corporate Crisis Management (30215). 2 units. As a result of unplanned for (or badly planned for) negative events, companies increasingly find themselves as targets of aggressive legal action, media coverage and regulatory pressure. This is particularly the case for large or name-brand companies. Recent examples include Volkswagen, Valeant FIFA, Chipotle, and Deflategate. The scale can range from an existential threat, such as BP’s oil spill, to a more minor reputational crisis, such as Lululemon’s recall.

    One of the key challenges presented by these developments is that they do not arise from the usual interactions that characterize “normal” business. Instead, companies must organize and act across traditional hierarchies and areas of expertise and many times face antagonistic, unexpected tactics designed for maximal visibility and shock effect, potentially to force industry-wide change. In advising clients in these situations, lawyers must coordinate business concerns, legal issues, stakeholder concerns and regulatory matters, as well as plan for both expected and unexpected outcomes.

    This class is based on experiential learning: a rich set of case studies and crisis simulation exercises balance the theoretical and legal frameworks and will help participants to improve their strategic thinking as well as team management and communication skills in high-stress situations. Enrollment limited to twenty. Permission of the instructors required. H. Coleman, M. Trevino, and M. Wiseman.

    Note: No drops will be permitted after the first class.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20174

    Close
    • 21694-01
    • Courts and the State: Seminar
    • Farhang
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment (20)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Courts and the State (21694). 2 units. The course will focus on legal and political science scholarship seeking to understand and evaluate courts’ relationship to other institutions and actors, commonly referred to as “external” sources of influence on judicial institutions, behavior, and policymaking. Sources of influence considered will be public opinion, elections, interest groups, political parties, executives, and legislatures. The focus of readings is on the United States, but some cross-national comparative work will be considered. The primary but not exclusive emphasis is on readings from institutionalist perspectives, both historical and rational choice. Multiple short papers required. Enrollment capped at fifteen. S. Farhang.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20091

    Close
    • 21023-01
    • Cybersecurity, Cyberlaw and IR
    • Wittenstein
    • Wed 9:25 AM-11:15 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission (4)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Cybersecurity, Cyberwar and International Relations (21023). 2 units. Today’s Internet is far more than a system for sending mail or compiling information. Cyberspace is the backbone of our global commerce, communication and defense systems, and the critical infrastructure that powers our modern civilization. Yet despite the immense benefits that have resulted from this global connectivity, significant vulnerabilities persist and threats are on the rise, especially from the standpoint of American national security interests. Drawing from a variety of academic and government sources in the fields of history, law, political science, and sociology, this course analyzes the rapidly evolving realm of international cyber relations. Topics include cybercrime, cyberespionage, cyberterrorism, cyberwar, and cyber governance. After exploring the history, growth, current functions, and management of the Internet, the class will turn to a number of recent challenges that cyberspace has helped produce: North Korea’s cyberattack against Sony Pictures; scandals like WikiLeaks and Edward Snowden’s disclosures about the National Security Agency; new cyberweapons like Stuxnet, which attacked the Iranian nuclear enrichment program at Natanz; technologies employed by authoritarian governments to monitor and stifle online dissent; the role that social networking technologies have played in the Arab Spring revolutions; tensions in U.S.-China relations resulting from cyberespionage and theft of intellectual property; and “hactivists” whose online protests cause significant disruption.

    Particular attention will be paid to whether any existing policy frameworks provide a basis for strengthening U.S. cybersecurity, fostering greater international understanding, and developing common cyber norms of behavior. This seminar also will reflect on the legal and ethical dimensions of cybersecurity; the unique challenges of attribution and deterrence in cyberspace; the proper role of national and international government oversight; the relationship between the public and private sectors; and the enduring tensions between privacy, transparency, freedom, and national security on the Internet. Each student will be assigned to write a short (500-800 words) memorandrum; students will be assigned to small groups, each of which will produce a threat assessment paper; a final research paper is also required. Paper required. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to four Law students. Also GLBL390b/GLBL 590b. E. Wittenstein.

    Course Bidding: If the course is oversubscribed, students will be asked to submit a brief statement of interest.

    Note: This course will meet according to the Yale College calendar.

    Location: WTS - B30 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24111

    Close
    • 30216-01
    • Drafting and Negotiating Merger and Acquisition Transactions
    • Adler
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (20)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Drafting and Negotiating Merger and Acquisition Transactions (30216). 2 units. The class will focus on understanding the structure and basic provisions of an acquisition agreement, highlighting the differences between the ABA Model agreement and “real-world” agreements. The class will focus on drafting and negotiation skills and students will practice drafting skills by working with a hypothetical purchase agreement. Students will then be divided into Buyer and Seller teams and participate in a simulated negotiation for the hypothetical transaction. Students will be guided by experienced M&A practitioners and investment bankers who will serve as guest coaches for the simulated negotiation. Preference given to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to sixteen. S.S. Adler and M.L. Gibson.

    Note: There are no prerequisites for this course, but students are encouraged to take Business Organizations either prior to or concurrently with this class. Priority will be given to students who list this course as their first preference among the experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20245

    Close
    • 21147-01
    • Drug Product Liability Litigation
    • Grossi
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment (25)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Drug Product Liability Litigation (21147). 2 units. More product liability lawsuits are filed against drug manufacturers than all other industries combined. As one scholar put it, the pharmaceutical industry is now “tobacco-land in terms of how much people hate it,” and drug product liability litigation is a “growth industry.” This course, taught by a practitioner with vast experience trying such cases, will consider the theory and practice of such litigation. At the outset, we will focus on the similarities and differences between pharma cases and other product liability cases, using the Diet Drug cases tried by the instructor as a model. We will then consider the doctrines governing such lawsuits—such as “failure to test”; inadequate warning; preemption of claims by federal regulation; learned intermediary; medical causation; and various forms of damages—discussing those issues both in their classic formulation in a single lawsuit, but also in the way those principles are applied in mass litigation, where there may be several thousand individual cases and multiple trials. The course will also consider the practical aspects of those cases, such as the special evidentiary problems when doctors are witnesses; techniques to present scientific material to juries; approaches to trial examination; and jury-selection strategies. Course Requirements: Short mid-term “bench" memorandum: (40 percent); self-scheduled final (open book; 50 percent); class participation (10 percent). Enrollment capped at twenty-five. Self-scheduled examination. P. T. Grossi, Jr.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20109
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 60 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21775-01
    • Equal Opportunity Law: Seminar
    • Fishkin
    • Wed 3:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Equal Opportunity Law: Seminar (21775). 2 units. This writing seminar will examine the efforts of the American legal system to promote equal opportunity in a variety of domains: in particular, education, housing, and employment. We will begin by asking the deceptively simple question, "What is equal opportunity"? We will examine some of the competing answers to this question that both legal scholars and political theorists have proposed and defended. Over the course of the semester, we will examine how our legal system applies different versions of the idea of equal opportunity to a series of practical policy problems, from hiring criteria to residential segregation, from school integration to affirmative action in higher education. Ultimately, our project is to understand both the power and the limits of law as a tool for promoting equal opportunity. There will be very short (one-page) reading responses due each week, in addition to the final paper, which may be on any topic related to equal opportunity, whether or not in the context of education, housing, or employment. Paper required. Enrollment limited. J.R. Fishkin.

    Note: If you would like to take this class, please attend the first class meeting.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20079

    Close
    • 21510-01
    • Financial Trading and Markets Regulation
    • Rosenberg
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment (15)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Financial Trading and Markets Regulation (21510). 2 units. Modern financial institutions engage in a wide array of trading activities using a multitude of financial instruments. These financial instruments – securities, futures, swaps, and other derivatives – are transacted by market participants in a variety of ways – sometimes traded directly with counterparties, sometimes on exchanges, and sometimes through other electronic trading facilities. Under the new, and increasingly complex, web of regulations that applies to these transactions, financial institutions must make business decisions based on regulatory realities. Lawyers advising financial institutions and other market participants, in turn, must understand both the transactions and the regulatory regimes to which they are subject.

    This course will explore the ways in which financial institutions trade financial instruments and the patchwork of regulations to which this trading activity is subject. The primary focus of the class will be derivatives trading – specifically futures and swaps trading – and the change in trading regulation since the passage of the Dodd-Frank Act in 2010. We will explore the legal structure around this trading and its application to real-world trading desks, including understanding how regulation affects business strategy and vice versa. Each student will write a paper and will present the paper idea to the class, with the ultimate goal of submitting the paper for publication in this area of increasing academic focus. No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to fifteen. G.D. Rosenberg.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20159

    Close
    • 21223-01
    • Global Governance and International Organizations
    • Sanchez
    • Thu 3:30 PM-5:20 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Global Governance and International Organizations (21223). 2 units. This course explores the role that international institutions play in world politics. The international system is anarchic, as there is no central authority that can impose a global order. Some international relations scholars argue that this lack of a sovereign leads to disorder and an inevitable fight for power, but others note that we see international organizations, norms, and laws that regulate an international system that is quite orderly. How are these institutions possible? How do states cooperate absent an ultimate authority that can enforce rules? Are international institutions efficacious? This course examines the scholarship on the sources of global governance. By looking at both theory and empirics, the course evaluates the structure of global governance in different areas, including international security, human rights, trade, development, and the environment. Paper required. Enrollment limited to five Law students. Permission of the instructor required. Also GLBL 917b. T. Sanchez.

    Note: This course will follow the Graduate School calendar.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a short statement of interest and a CV by December 8 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: WTS - A35 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24216

    Close
    • 30169-01
    • Global Health and Justice Practicum: Fieldwork
    • Kapczynski
      Miller
      Gonsalves
      Ricardo
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (12)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Global Health and Justice Practicum: Fieldwork (30169). 2 units. A fieldwork-only section of the Global Health and Justice Practicum. Students must be enrolled in the seminar and fieldwork sections simultaneously. Permission of the instructors required. A. Kapczynski, A. Miller, G. Gonsalves, and C. Ricardo.

    Course Bidding: Students who are accepted in the Global Health and Justice Practicum: Seminar will be automatically enrolled in the fieldwork section.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20119

    Close
    • 30168-01
    • Global Health and Justice Practicum: Seminar
    • Kapczynski
      Miller
      Gonsalves
      Ricardo
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (12)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Global Health and Justice Practicum (30168) and Fieldwork (30169). 4 units (2 units for each component).This course will fuse didactic and experiential learning on critical topics at the intersection of public health, rights, and justice in the twenty-first century. Through a weekly seminar and real-world projects, students will develop the knowledge and tools to engage critically and constructively with contemporary global health issues. Students from different disciplines will work in teams on projects, typically with outside partners, to address key mediators of health in the US and worldwide, with particular attention to concerns about health equity. Seminar readings and project approaches will draw from legal, public health, historical, anthropological, and other fields to introduce students to the multiple lenses through which health issues can be tackled, and to build their competence to work with colleagues in other disciplines around such interventions.

    Projects are selected with an eye toward the application of both public health and legal expertise, and students will be expected to reflect on ethics and methods in an interdisciplinary context. Recent GHJP projects have addressed, for example, the implications of Zika for women's reproductive rights and access to health care in Brazil; documenting problems with and litigating to challenge Ebola quarantines in the US; research to provide a rights-based analysis of the implications of "diversion courts" for people arrested on prostitution offenses in the US; documenting and building a framework for UN accountability for the introduction of cholera to Haiti; and addressing barriers to access to new hepatitis C treatment in low and middle income countries, and more recently in the US.

    There will be several clinic projects for spring 2017, and student interest will be taken into account when selecting project teams. Some of the projects above will continue; contact any faculty member for more details on likely projects.

    Students will work on projects in teams and be evaluated by their work product rather than a final exam. Students should be prepared to spend up to 10 hours outside of class each week (on average) on their projects, and for possible travel (typically during spring break) depending on the project. Resources will be available for travel for students as needed.

    The course will be designed for a mix of public health students and law students, though select students from other disciplines may also be admitted. This course meets the YSPH OPHP practicum requirement for Masters/Public Health Students. This course will meet according to the Law School calendar. Permission of the instructors required and an application must be submitted by the deadline noted below. Because the demand for the course is high, interviews may be conducted to select the final group of students for the practicum, most likely by phone in mid-December, shortly after the application deadline.

    Note: We may also establish special sessions and makeup sessions to accommodate the difference between schedules on the main campus and in the Law School. Law students accepted in the practicum section will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section. Both sections must be taken simultaneously. This course will meet according to the Law School calendar. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to twelve. Also CDE 596b. A. Kapczynski, A. Miller,G. Gonsalves, and C. Ricardo.

    IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN APPLYING:
    • Yale Law School Students: In addition to listing the course among experiential course selections, students should submit a CV and statement of interest. In the statement, law students should describe their interest in work on global and local health issues, as well as any relevant courses or other experience.
    • Yale Public Health students should submit a CV and a statement of interest in policy and legal issues related to health, and any relevant courses or other experiences at the law/policy/health intersection.
    • Yale Graduate Students outside of public health and law may be admitted to the course, and should write the instructors about the application materials required. In the past, students from the Jackson Institute, the medical and management schools have been enrolled, and the course is open to any graduate or professional student at Yale.

    Law students should submit the materials by 4:30 p.m. on December 8 to the YLS registrar through the bidding system. All other students should send materials to Health.justice@yale.edu by 4:30 p.m. on December 8.

    Note: Because project work begins immediately, and is collaborative and intense, this is not a class that students will have the opportunity to "shop." Enrollment in this class presumes a serious commitment of time, and projects immediately engage students in collective responsibilities; accordingly, there is a no-drop policy for this class.
    Note:Students accepted in the practicum section will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section. Both sections must be taken simultaneously.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20118

    Close
    • 21780-01
    • The History of Property Law: Seminar
    • Whitman
      Zhang
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment (15)
    • paper required
    Expand

    [The] History of Property Law (21780). 2 units. This seminar will investigate topics in the history of property law, focusing on East Asia and Western Europe. The aim of the seminar is to use the resources of history to address fundamental problems in the nature and justification of property rights. The topics discussed will include the Marxist tradition, the relationship between ownership and lordship, the decline of feudalism, the law of slavery, the role of property institutions in the creation of the modern global economy, theories of moral economy, and the rise of a single umbrella modern concept of "property" in place of the multiplicitous varieties of property that existed in the past. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. J.Q. Whitman and T. Zhang.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20191

    Close
    • 30113-01
    • Immigration Legal Services Clinic: Seminar
    • Peters
      Zonana
    • Mon 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (4)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Immigration Legal Services: Seminar (30113) and Fieldwork (30140). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each section (4 units total). This clinic will specialize in the representation of persons who are seeking asylum through affirmative procedures or in removal proceedings or post-asylum relief. Seminar sessions will focus on the substantive and procedural law, on the legal and ethical issues arising in the context of casework and on the development of lawyering skills. Classes will be heavily concentrated in the first half of the term, with additional sessions supplementing the weekly class time. Students will also attend weekly supervisions on their case work. The clinical seminar and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to four. J.K. Peters and H.V. Zonana.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.

    Note: Due to our immediate commitments to clients, Professor Peters will finalize the roster by email before the first class, after which the clinic cannot be dropped. Because classes prepare students for client work, attendance at all classes is mandatory.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20151

    Close
    • 30140-01
    • Immigration Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Peters
      Zonana
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Immigration Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork (30140). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. The clinical seminar and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. Permission of the instructors required. J.K. Peters and H.V. Zonana.

    Coures Bidding: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in both the seminar and the fieldwork sections. Students should list only the seminar section among experiential course bidding selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student, director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 21695

    Close
    • 21283-01
    • International Commercial Arbitration
    • Banifatemi
      Gaillard
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
      Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    International Commercial Arbitration (21283). 2 units. International commercial arbitration has increased as a function of world trade. This seminar will examine systematically and comparatively, through statutes, rules, national and international cases, and treaties, the establishment, operation, and implementation of awards of international arbitration tribunals; the role of national courts in compelling, facilitating, and enforcing or vacating arbitral awards; and policies currently under consideration for changing arbitral practices. Enrollment will be limited to twenty. Scheduled examination* or paper option. Permission of the instructors required. Y. Banifatemi and E. Gaillard.

    Note: This class will meet on Monday and Wednesday, 6:10 until 8 pm for six weeks beginning on January 23. There will be an additional meeting on Thursday, January 26, 6:10-8 pm, in room 111.
    * The "scheduled examination" will actually take place during the class meeting on February 27, which will be a double session extended for an additional two hours to allow time for the evaluation exercises.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23159
    Exam: at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21508-01
    • Law and Globalization
    • Esty
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:05 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment (10)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Law and Globalization (21508). 2 units. The Law and Globalization seminar is an ongoing Yale Law School colloquium series for the discussion of recent scholarly research on legal aspects of globalization, broadly conceived. The focus of the spring 2017 edition will be new research on sustainability issues, including energy, environment, the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals, and the tensions between trade liberalization and sustainability.After a series of introductory sessions that lay out these topics, we will host five scholars who will present works-in-progress on the law, policy, and politics of various issues at the globalization-sustainability interface. On off-weeks, we will read and discuss texts selected by our visitors in preparation for their presentations. Requirements include: (1) full participation in the seminar, including circulating two short (two-page) discussion papers on the scholarly works being presented; and (2) the writing of either one 25-to-30-page research paper on a topic relevant to globalization and sustainability or three 8-page essays responding to the papers being presented in the seminar. Students may earn additional credit if they wish to produce a major research paper. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen (ten Law students). Also F&ES 845b/GLBL 596b. D.C. Esty.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is required. Any accepted student who does not attend the first class meeting will be dropped from the course and places will then be offered to students on the waiting list.
    Note: The first class meeting will be on Wednesday, January 18, from 6:10 until 8 p.m. in room 110 at the Law School. Thereafter, classes will meet at the regular Monday afternoon time, 4:10-6:05 p.m. Attendance is required. Waitlisted students who wish to be considered if places open must also attend the January 18 class meeting.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20072

    Close
    • 21299-01
    • Law and Political Economy
    • Kapczynski
    • Thu 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Law and Political Economy (21299). 2 units, credit/fail. This seminar will examine the relationship between the economy and political life, with particular attention to the role of law in mediating the relationship between the two. We will begin with key theoretical readings that articulate the embeddedness of the economy in politics (e.g. Polanyi), and that critique the conception of efficiency as a politically neutral value (e.g. Anderson, Dworkin). We will then pivot to consider recent legal scholarship across a range of fields that seeks to bring questions of political economy to the center, and thereby to make our legal and social order more just, equal, democratic, and sustainable. Topics to be explored include the political economy of the U.S. Constitution, of trade law, of racial justice, of sexual rights, of work and labor law, and of environmental law. Seminar participants will be asked to help lead at least one class session, and at the end of the course time will be allocated for topics that students identify as important to their own research agendas or to emerging political events. Students seeking graded credits may add a third credit, and complete a series of response papers over the course of the semester. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of the instructor required. A. Kapczynski.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit one-paragraph describing their interest in the course. You may send the statement directly to Professor Kapczynski (amy.kapczynski@yale.edu) and you may also upload the statement in the bidding system by December 8 at 4:30 p.m. Note: Professor Kapczynski will make decisions on who to admit based solely on the statements of interest, not based on the weighted rank.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 24178

    Close
    • 30194-01
    • Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Seminar
    • Bhandary-Alexander
      Blank
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (16)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Seminar (30194) and Fieldwork (30195). 2 units, for each component, 4 units total. Students may elect credit/fail and must do so by the stated deadline each term. Students must be enrolled in the seminar and fieldwork components simultaneously. Students in the New Haven Legal Assistance Immigrant Rights Clinic (IRC) will represent immigrants and their organizations in court, before administrative agencies, and in the legislature. IRC is based at New Haven Legal Assistance (LAA), a historic non-profit civil legal services office whose mission is to secure justice for and to protect the rights of those residents of New Haven County unable to engage legal counsel.

    The clinic will be a legal resource for immigrant communities and their organizations. Through their advocacy and coursework, students in the clinic will learn to practice as legal services lawyers representing immigrants and their organizations. Students can expect to work both on individual cases and on policy matters arising from needs in the community. Community partners will refer cases to the clinic, and there will be no substantive area of law excluded from consideration.

    Referring community organizations will likely include Junta for Progressive Action, a non-profit service provider and advocacy organization (http://juntainc.org/en/); Unidad Latina en Acción, a grassroots membership-based community organization (https://ulanewhaven.org/); and Haven Health Clinic, a student-run primary care clinic in the Fair Haven neighborhood (http://www.havenfreeclinic.org/hfc/). Enrollment limited to sixteen. J. Bhandary-Alexander and D. Blank.

    Note: No drops will be permitted after students have confirmed their acceptance of a place, and not after the first seminar meeting.

    Course Bidding: In addition to ranking the seminar section of this clinic among experiential course selections, students should submit a one-to-two page personal statement and a CV by the close of the bidding period on December 8 at 4:30 p.m. Students who are accepted in the clinic seminar will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance (all versions); or Prosecution Externship.

    Location: NHLAO - CONF (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20193

    Close
    • 30195-01
    • Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Bhandary-Alexander
      Blank
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (16)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Fieldwork (30195). 2 units. Students must enroll simultaneously in the seminar and fieldwork components of this clinic. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to sixteen. J. Bhandary-Alexander and D. Blank.

    Course Bidding: Students who are accepted in the seminar component will be enrolled in the fieldwork component. It is not necessary to bid on the fieldwork component.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20194

    Close
    • 21534-01
    • Liman Workshop: Imprisoned
    • Resnik
      Wall
      Van Cleave
      Bell
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Liman Public Interest Workshop: Imprisoned (21534). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. The number of people in jails and prisons rose substantially from the 1970s through the present, with some leveling off or modest declines in recent years in a few jurisdictions. More than 2 million persons are in jails or prisons. More than 5 million people are under supervision through probation, parole, and supervised release. Data from the Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that one in 107 American adults was behind bars, a rate roughly five times the worldwide average, and one in 50 was under some type of supervision.

    Incarceration does not have the same impact on all who live in the United States; race, gender, age, nationality, and ethnicity interact to affect the likelihood that one will be detained or have family and community members in detention. People of color are disproportionately in prison. In 2010, black men were six times as likely to be incarcerated as white men; African Americans and Latinos constituted more than 60% of people imprisoned.

    Participants in this Workshop will explore the history of detention and imprisonment in the United States; the rise of detention facilities owned and operated by the private sector; the use of specific forms of detention such as solitary confinement and specialized supermax facilities; and growing concerns about the costs —dignitary, social, political, and financial, — of the system now in use. Our sessions will address the law of prisons, the market for prisons, and the perspectives of those who direct prisons, who work in them, and who are detained by them. When doing so, we will look at both U.S. and non-U.S. law, such as the 1933 Guidelines of the League of Nations; the European Prison Rules of the Council of Europe; and the 2015 U.N. Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners (“Mandela Rules”); statutes, and court decisions. We will consider the degree of oversight that courts, legislatures, and other actors have in shaping the parameters of permissible sanctions, regulating conditions of confinement, and in crafting remedies for violations. Students participating credit/fail must choose four times during the term after the first two sessions to submit two-page reflections that offer comments on that week's readings. Students who would like graded credit have two options: For two units of credit, students may write a responsive essay of no more than 3,000 words during the examination period; students who wish to completed a Supervised Analytic Writing paper or a Substantial Paper for three graded credits need to submit a proposal by the fifth week of the term and meet with instructors to determine its feasibility and then agree upon a research plan and schedule. J. Resnik, K. Bell, A. Van Cleave, and A.T. Wall.

    Note: The Workshop meets weekly; preparation and attendance at these discussions is required for credit.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20157

    Close
    • 30172-01
    • Liman Project: Incarceration, Isolation, and Criminal Justice Reform
    • Resnik
      Fernandez
      Van Cleave
      Bell
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Liman Project: Incarceration, Isolation, and Criminal Justice Reform (30172). 2 units, credit/fail with a graded option. This project enables students, working in groups, to learn about the law of and to work on understanding facets of incarceration. One ongoing project involves studying how prisons use and regulate long-term isolation (sometimes called “solitary confinement,” or “restricted housing” or “administrative segregation”) and working on how to reduce the numbers of persons in isolation and the degrees of isolation for those in such placements. The Liman Program has done two national surveys, and will continue to do data collection and analyses, as well as more research on the law and policies related to isolation more generally. Another project focuses on the role gender plays in incarceration, in terms of the ways in which women and men are classified, placed in facilities, and the programs and rules imposed. Again, the goals include research and reform. Students work in teams and meet regularly with supervisors, and, with permission, students may elect to write a related Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper for additional graded credit. Writing is required, as the projects always involve reports, power points, and research memos. The projects usually span more than one semester and have, on occasion, resulted in published articles. Permission of the instructors required. J. Resnik, K. Bell, L. Fernandez, and A. Van Cleave.

    Course Bidding: Students should provide a brief statement of interest and a C.V. by December 8, at 4:30 p.m. Bidding on this clinic constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of the student's Law transcript to the instructor. The instructors will only consider the statement of interest, not the weighted preference, in determing who is accepted, so students should be clear about whether they are very interested in participating even if they are also in other clinics.

    Note: Regular meeting times will be determined after class schedules are set so that times work for as many as possible.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20156

    Close
    • 21485-01
    • Litigation and Regulatory Implementation
    • Farhang
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment (20)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Litigation and Regulatory Implementation (21485). 2 units. The course will focus on litigation in the contemporary American legal system. Topics addressed will include explanations for the general shift in recent decades away from administrative regulation and enforcement and toward use of private litigation as a regulatory tool, the legal and policy implications of that trend, and contemporary efforts to retrench or remake the system. We will examine these topics from a number of substantive and procedural angles using scholarship, case studies, and some case law. We will explore such disparate substantive areas of law as employment discrimination, securities regulation, qui tam lawsuits under the False Claims Act, and mass torts. We will also discuss trans-substantive topics such as the class action device and private enforcement of public law (through regimes that deputize “private attorneys general”). The seminar will seek to integrate knowledge from a number of fields (law, political science, economics) to grapple with practical problems of institutional design. Multiple short papers required. Enrollment capped at fifteen. S. Farhang.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20092

    Close
    • 21664-01
    • Practicing In-House in an Increasingly Integrated World
    • Solender
      Cutler
    • Thu 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility
    • faculty permission (22)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Practicing In-House in an Increasingly Integrated World (21664). 2 units. This course will explore the challenges faced by a senior in-house lawyer in today’s increasingly integrated international business environment. We will do so through a series of problems faced by the legal staff of multi-national corporations. The "cases" in this course pose questions about how to confront legal and ethical issues in many different national markets, using specific illustrations drawn from the contemporary business world -- e.g., the Sony hacking incident, Google's response to censorship in China, Walmart’s challenges arising from the fire in the Bangladesh installation, and the obstacles to Uber's business model around the world. These cases involve a broad range of considerations: ethics, reputation, risk management, international public policy and politics, culture, business, communications and corporate citizenship. The course will explore the skills needed by inside counsel to address these challenges, the increasingly global role of in-house counsel in large corporations, and the challenges to the profession from this demanding new form of legal practice. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to twenty-two. Self-scheduled examination. M.S. Solender and S.M. Cutler.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among their permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should submit, by December 8, at 4:30 pm, a CV and a statement of interest including a description of any business-related coursework they have completed (whether in law school or elsewhere) or other business-related experience they have had (i.e., employment, extracurricular activities).

    Location: SLB - 110 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20170
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21776-01
    • Roman Law
    • Lenski
    • Mon 10:30 AM-11:20 AM
      Wed 10:30 AM-11:20 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Roman Law (21776). 2 units. This course is designed to present students with an overview of Roman Civil Law. The Law of Persons, Property, Obligations and Succession will be presented in this order, just as it would have to law students in the ancient world two millennia ago. Unlike those students, however, you will be given the chance to step back from the minutiae and examine how it was shaped and adapted over the course of Roman history to reflect the needs of the society it served. You will also look forward through history to determine some of the ways that Roman Law has shaped modern law systems in this country and across the world. The course will also survey religious, criminal, constitutional and international law. Above all, it will train you in how to use the detailed and comprehensive study of a legal system to shed light on social and economic history, a skill that should be applicable across cultures, including our own. The course assumes no knowledge of Roman History or of Latin. Students will be expected to learn the Latin terminology to which they are introduced, just as they must learn the technical language of any discipline which they study. Scheduled examination. Also CLCV 236b/HIST. N. Lenski.

    Note: This course will meet according to the Yale College calendar.

    Location: WLH - 208 (Mon)
    WLH - 208 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20133
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21141-01
    • [The] Science of Science Communication
    • Kahan
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    [The] Science of Science Communication (21141). 2 units. The simple dissemination of valid scientific knowledge does not guarantee it will be recognized by non-experts to whom it is of consequence. The science of science communication is an emerging, multidisciplinary field that investigates the processes that enable ordinary citizens to form beliefs consistent with the best available scientific evidence, the conditions that impede the formation of such beliefs, and the strategies that can be employed to avoid or ameliorate such conditions. This seminar will survey, and make a modest attempt to systematize, the growing body of work in this area. Special attention will be paid to identifying the distinctive communication dynamics of the diverse contexts in which non-experts engage scientific information, including electoral politics, governmental policymaking, and personal health decision making. Paper required. Permission of the instructor required. Also PSYC 601b/F&ES 862b/HPM 601b. D.M. Kahan.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should also submit a statement of interest by 4:30 p.m. on December 8.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20116

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    • 21065-01
    • Securities Regulation
    • Testani
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment (50)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Securities Regulation (21065). 2 units. The focus of this class will be on discussing core themes under the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 from a statutory perspective, SEC rulemaking perspective, and key judicial cases perspective. Enrollment capped at fifty. Scheduled examination. R.A. Testani.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23760
    Exam: 5/05/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21192-01
    • Taxation of Business Income
    • Alstott
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Taxation of Business Income (21192). 2 units, credit/fail. This course will introduce the federal income tax rules that govern the taxation of business income. Topics include the taxation of corporations and partnerships and the U.S. rules governing the taxation of cross-border income. We will work with the Code and regulations and will emphasize the structure and internal logic of each area. We will also explore (briefly) major policy issues. This course will serve as an introduction to these topics for students who want an overview of business taxation. Students who want to delve more deeply into these subjects should go on to the separate courses in corporate, partnership, and international tax. The course will be offered credit/fail, and students will be expected to submit comments and questions from time to time. Students who wish to take the course for graded credit may do so but will have to complete a paper of roughly ten pages explaining a complex transaction. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. A.L. Alstott.

    Note: Any student who is interested in taking the course for a grade must elect that option and file the necessary petition with the Registrar’s Office by Friday, February 3. After that date, it will not be possible to elect the course for a grade.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 24277

    Close
    • 21207-01
    • Taxation: Directed Research
    • Liscow
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission (6)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Taxation: Directed Research (21207). 2 units. The instructor will supervise students who wish to write a paper about taxation, or related topics in law and economics. Open only to JD students. Paper required. Enrollment limited to six. Permission of the instructor required. Z. D. Liscow.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission of instructor selections, students should submit a CV and a description of a potential research project by December 8 at 4:30 p.m. Listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of the student's Law transcript to the instructor.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20134

    Close
    • 21325-01
    • Technology Law
    • Balkin
      Crootof
      Ard
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Technology Law (21325). 2 units. This course will study the regulatory challenges posed by disruptive technologies. We will consider the interplay of law, technological design, norms, and the market as modalities of regulation; competing strategies for updating the law through courts, legislatures, administrative agencies, and international institutions; efforts by incumbent and newcomer industries to use the law to promote their preferred business models; and the legal implications of other political, economic, and social impacts associated with disruptive technologies. Case studies include smart phones, autonomous weapon systems, VCRs, robotics, driverless cars, cyberwarfare, the railroad, "clickwrap" contracts, social media, Big Data analytics, the Internet of Things, and 3-D printing. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. J.M. Balkin, F.E. Ard, and R. Crootof.

    Location: BAKER - A420 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20055
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30123-01
    • Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Seminar
    • Wishnie
      Wenzloff
      Kuzma
      Lado
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Veterans Legal Services Clinic (30123) and Fieldwork (30124). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). The clinic and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. There are approximately 250,000 veterans currently residing in Connecticut, many with acute and unique legal needs related to their military service or return to civilian life. In this clinic, students represent Connecticut veterans in a range of individual litigation and institutional advocacy matters. Pending individual matters include (1) benefits applications for veterans who have suffered PTSD, sexual assault, and other injuries, in the first instance, on administrative appeal, and on judicial review of administrative denials; and (2) discharge upgrade applications, on administrative appeal and in U.S. District Court. Students also represent local and national veterans organizations in Freedom of Information Act litigation in U.S. District Court; civil rights litigation arising from sexual assault, and other-than-honorable discharges of service members suffering undiagnosed PTSD; and federal and state regulatory and legislative advocacy concerning veterans' employment issues, criminal justice matters, treatment of service members with PTSD and military sexual assault and rape. The seminar portion is a practice-oriented examination of advocacy on behalf of veterans and of social justice lawyering generally. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, M.R. Kuzma, M.E. Lado, and A. Wenzloff.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among your experiential course selections, you must also submit a statement of interest in the clinic and a copy of your resume by the close of early registration on December 8, at 4:30 p.m. Students who are accepted in the clinic will be enrolled in the fieldwork section as well.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20180

    Close
    • 30124-01
    • Veterans Legal Services Fieldwork
    • Wishnie
      Wenzloff
      Kuzma
      Lado
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Veteran Legal Services Fieldwork (30124). 2 units, credit/fail or graded at student option. Must be taken in conjunction with the Veteran Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, M.R. Kuzma, M.E. Lado, and A. Wenzloff.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in both the seminar and the fieldwork sections. It is not necessary to bid on the fieldwork component.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20181

    Close
    • 30127-01
    • Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic
    • Ahmad
      Wishnie
      Orihuela
      Loyo
      Mukherjee
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic (30127) and Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). Students will represent immigrants and low-wage workers in Connecticut in labor, immigration, and other civil rights areas, through litigation for individuals and non-litigation advocacy for community-based organizations. In litigation matters, students will handle cases at all stages of legal proceedings in Immigration Court, Board of Immigration Appeals, U.S. District Court, the Second Circuit, and state courts. The non-litigation work will include representation of grassroots organizations, labor and faith organizations in regulatory and legislative reform efforts, media advocacy, strategic planning, and other matters. The seminar portion is a practice-oriented examination of advocacy on behalf of workers and non-citizens and of social justice lawyering generally. The course will be a two-term offering (4 units each term). The clinical course and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously in both terms. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. M.I. Ahmad, M.J. Wishnie, R. Loyo, E. Mukherjee, and M. Orihuela.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing the clinic experiential permission courses, interested students should submit a resume and a statement of interest by December 8 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Students admitted to WIRAC must confirm their participation in advance of the first class by a date designated by the instructors.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20184

    Close
    • 30128-01
    • Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy: Fieldwork
    • Ahmad
      Wishnie
      Orihuela
      Loyo
      Mukherjee
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. The clinical course and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously in both terms. M.I. Ahmad, M.J. Wishnie, R. Loyo, E. Mukherjee, and M. Orihuela.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in both the seminar and the fieldwork sections. Students should list only the seminar section among experiential course bidding selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the follow non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20185

    Close
    • 21027-01
    • Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources
    • Krishnaswami
      Harrison
    • Tue 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Thu 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Skills
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources (21027). 2 or 3 units. An advanced exploration of the specialized methods and sources of legal research in some of the following areas: secondary legal authority, case law, statutory authority, legislative history, court rules and practice materials, and administrative law. The course will also cover the legal research process, and tracking research as well as other strategies for efficient and effective legal research. Class sessions will integrate the use of online, print, and other sources to solve legal research problems. Laptop computer recommended. Students are required to complete a series of assignments, in addition to the other course requirements. Students who wish to qualify for a third unit will need to write a paper, in addition to the other course requirements.

    Note: The Tuesday/Thursday morning section of this course (Section 01) has an enrollment cap of twenty-five students. The Tuesday/Thursday section (Section 02) has no enrollment cap.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Tue)
    SLB - 122 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20125

    Close
    • 21027-02
    • Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources
    • Nann
      Harrison
      Krishnaswami
    • Tue 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Skills
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources (21027). 2 or 3 units. An advanced exploration of the specialized methods and sources of legal research in some of the following areas: secondary legal authority, case law, statutory authority, legislative history, court rules and practice materials, and administrative law. The course will also cover the legal research process, and tracking research as well as other strategies for efficient and effective legal research. Class sessions will integrate the use of online, print, and other sources to solve legal research problems. Laptop computer recommended. Students are required to complete a series of assignments, in addition to the other course requirements. Students who wish to qualify for a third unit will need to write a paper, in addition to the other course requirements.

    Note: The Tuesday/Thursday morning section of this course (Section 01) has an enrollment cap of twenty-five students. The Tuesday/Thursday section (Section 02) has no enrollment cap.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20126

    Close
    • 30184-01
    • Advanced Global Health Justice Practicum
    • Kapczynski
      Miller
      Gonsalves
      Ricardo
    • 2 or 3
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Global Health Justice Practicum (30184). 2 or 3 units. Open only to students who have completed the basic Global Health Justice Practicum. Permission of the instructors required. A. Kapczynski, G. Gonsalves, A. Miller, and C. Ricardo.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24779

    Close
    • 30171-01
    • Advanced International Refugee Assistance Project
    • Heller
      Finkbeiner
    • 2 or 3
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced International Refugee Assistance Project (30171). 2 or 3 units. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Global Refugee Legal Assistance. Permission of the instructors required. R. Heller and L. Finkbeiner.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20248

    Close
    • 21171-01
    • [The] Law and Regulation of Banks and Other Financial Intermediaries
    • Macey
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    [The] Law and Regulation of Banks and Other Financial Intermediaries (21171). 2 or 3 units. This course will begin with an overview of the legal and business environment in which banks and other financial intermediaries (investment banks, insurance companies) operate. The course will focus on the law, history, politics and economics affecting firms engaged in businesses such as banking, insurance, investment banking, mutual funds. We will then discuss entry into the business of banking; the dual banking system; the shadow banking system; corporate governance of banks, activities restrictions and limitations on investments; the regulation of deposit taking; safety and soundness regulation and prudential restriction of bank activities; consumer protection and lender liability; mutual funds; consumer protection and capital requirements; insurance and securities powers of banks and non-banks; affiliations between banks and other companies; examination and enforcement issues; bank failure; and international banking. Particular attention will be paid to the recurring problem of financial crisis, systemic risk and to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act provisions related to consumer protection and the resolution of failed banks. The concept of “Systemically Important Financial Institutions” and the “Volcker rule,” which purports to prohibit banks and bank holding companies from engaging in proprietary trading (trading with their own capital rather than on behalf of customers), will also be subjects of attention. There are no prerequisites for this course. Information about financial economics and accounting and market microstructure that may be necessary to understand the legal and policy concepts developed in the course will be taught as part of the course. Self-scheduled examination and short paper required for 3 units of credit, or self-scheduled examination only for 2 units of credit. Self-scheduled examination. J.R. Macey.

    Note: This course is open only to Law students.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20139
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 2 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21733-01
    • City Policing: Examining Policies and Practices
    • Tyler
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • faculty permission (5)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    City Policing: Examining Policies and Practices (21733). 2 or 3 units. This class will reflect the access to ongoing policing in New Haven provided through partnership between Yale Law School and the New Haven Police Department. Students will propose and conduct projects that involve them in the activities of the New Haven Police Department. The projects will be supervised by Dean Esserman and Professors Tracey Meares and Tom Tyler. Students interested in conducting a research project that involves policing activities should submit a proposal concerning their project and the type of access to the police department that they would like to have to conduct those projects. Past projects have included making a film about community policing; interviewing officers about disciplinary policing in different policing departments; and other projects that benefit from having cooperation with the New Haven Police Department. Students accepted for the class will work with the instructors to make a plan for their project and its final product. Professors Meares and Tyler will provide academic guidance as appropriate. Enrollment limited to five. Permission of the instructors required. T. Meares, T. Tyler, and D. Esserman.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a one-paragraph proposal concerning their project by the close of the bidding period at 4:30 p.m. on December 8 .

    Note:Class meetings will be arranged after the schedules of all accepted students have been settled.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24110

    Close
    • 21719-01
    • Conservative Critiques of the Administrative State
    • Elliott
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • open enrollment (20)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Conservative Critiques of the Administrative State (21719). 2 or 3 units. According to some conservative scholars, American law took a "wrong turn" at the New Deal and the rise of the "Administrative State" is a terrible mistake that should be curtailed or undone. This seminar will consider the arguments of conservative critics, including Friedrich von Hayek, Richard Epstein, Antonin Scalia, Chuck Cooper, and Gary Lawson. A prior course or simultaneous course in Administrative Law is helpful but not required. Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit available. Enrollment capped at twenty. Paper required. E.D. Elliott. Note: Class participation counts toward the final grade. No more than three missed classes permitted.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20070

    Close
    • 21778-01
    • The Constitution of the Family: Emerging Issues
    • Siegel
      Greenhouse
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    The Constitution of the Family: Emerging Issues (21778). 2 or 3 units. This course will examine constitutional law concerning reproduction and the family. How does the law protect and support decisions about parenting and family care, in and out of marriage? What competing understandings of liberty, equality, and the role of government shape judgments in this field? On what beliefs about biology, family, and community do these judgments rest? How might the law better take account of inequalities based on gender/sexuality/race/class? The course will address topics including: pregnancy and child care in the workplace, abortion, same-sex marriage and parental rights, the nonmarital family. We will focus on constitutional law with some coverage of related bodies of civil rights law. Self-scheduled examination or paper option with permission of instructors. R.B. Siegel and L. Greenhouse.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20169
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21042-01
    • Corruption, Economic Development, and Democracy
    • Rose-Ackerman
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (10)
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Corruption, Economic Development, and Democracy (21042). 2 or 3 units. A seminar on the link between political and bureaucratic institutions, on the one hand, and economic development, on the other. A particular focus will be the impact of corruption on development and the establishment of democratic government. Paper (2 or 3 units) or self-scheduled examination (2 units). Enrollment limited to ten Law students. Also PLSC 714b. S. Rose-Ackerman.

    Course Bidding: Students who bid should also submit a short paragraph explaining their relevant background and interest in the course by 4:30 pm on December 8. Preference will given to first-choice students in their last year of law school or in the LLM program.

    Note: The course is cross-listed with the Political Science Department, but Professor Rose-Ackerman anticipates that there will be additional places available. Students on the waiting list should come to the first class meeting to learn if places have opened.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20158
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30119-01
    • Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic
    • Gentes
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (12)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic (30119). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail for students' first term; students may opt into grading after the first term. Students in this clinical seminar will represent homeowners fighting foreclosure in Connecticut state and federal court. They will advise clients both in and outside the courthouse and appear in court multiple times during the semester through the clinic's limited-scope representation program, "Attorney for Short Calendar." Students will also have an ongoing caseload in which they will conduct motion practice and discovery, including legal research and writing, as well as represent clients in Connecticut foreclosure mediation. Clinic students also engage in novel affirmative litigation against the mortgage industry and engage in appellate work through direct representation in Connecticut and amicus work nationwide. The clinic is also involved in legislative advocacy to expand the legal remedies available to homeowners fighting foreclosure. Weekly seminars focus on case preparation, skill development, and housing policy (with an emphasis on discriminatory and abusive lending, as well as the government's enabling of and response to such practices). Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to twelve. J. Gentes.

    Course Bidding: Because the clinic represents Spanish-speaking clients with limited English proficiency, we need at least a few students who are fluent in Spanish. Students who fit the bill should email Professor Gentes during the bidding period (jeffrey.gentes@yale.edu), as well as submit the question through the YLS:Courses bidding system.

    Note: Attendance at first class meeting is required and students cannot drop after that.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20093

    Close
    • 21497-01
    • Seminar in Private Law
    • Markovits
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Seminar in Private Law (21497). 2 or 3 units. The Spring 2017 edition of the Seminar in Private Law will focus on Consumer Law. The seminar will take up the distinctive legal, economic, and social problems presented by a modern consumer economy. Themes will include consumer protection (including both substantive doctrine and the choice of doctrinal styles and institutional structures for regulating consumer contracts), the relationship between consumer law and distributive justice, and the sociology and culture of mass consumption. At least half of the seminar's sessions will involve presentations by outside speakers from law and associated disciplines. The remainder will prepare for the speaker presentations. Term paper required for three units of credit; thought papers for two units of credit. Enrollment limited. D. Markovits.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20140

    Close
    • 21760-01
    • Products Liability
    • Kysar
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (18)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Products Liability (21760). 2 or 3 units. This seminar will examine the law of products liability, giving attention to both doctrinal and theoretical aspects of the field. In addition to regular attendance and active participation in class discussion, students will undertake a research project to fulfill the course requirements. For research papers of appropriate scope and ambition, Substantial Paper (2 units, graded) or Supervised Analytic Writing (3 units, graded) certification will be available. Although we will focus on products liability during class sessions, students may pursue research papers that concern any aspect of torts or consumer protection. A research memorandum option (2 units, graded or credit/fail, no Substantial Paper or Supervised Analytic Writing certification) also will be available to fulfill the course research project requirement. Paper required. Enrollment limited to sixteen. D. Kysar.

    Note: First-day attendance required.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20127

    Close
    • 30193-01
    • Prosecution Externship and Instruction
    • Stith
      Brennan
      Perry
      Nagala
    • Wed 3:30 PM-5:20 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Prosecution Externship and Instruction (30193). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical externship will assist state or federal prosecutors with their responsibilities, both before and at trial. Federal placements are available in New Haven and surrounding cities or in Bridgeport; the federal caseload is varied, including misdemeanors, felonies, or specialized areas such as career criminal, drug trafficking, or appellate work. The State’s Attorney for New Haven, which also has a varied but faster-paced docket, can take one or two student placements. All students are required to attend weekly class sessions, which will range from discussions of assigned readings to field trips to prisons, police laboratories, etc. Students will be required to keep journals and time records. Placements at the U.S. Attorney's Office must be arranged at least four months in advance, to allow time for security clearance procedures. Students also apply for the State's Attorney during the previous term, though interviews may take place after the student has been accepted into the Externship program. Although enrollment is limited and permission of the instructor is required, timing and the involvement of outside agencies remove this clinic from the usual sign-up process for limited enrollment courses. Selection for this course takes place before limited-enrollment course bidding. K. Stith, L. Brennan, S.V. Nagala, and A. Perry.

    Course Bidding Information: Select this course as your lowest weight among experiential course selections. Open only to students who have been pre-selected to participate. Do not select this course during pre-registration if you are not one of those students.

    Note:As part of the application process, students submit statements of interest; interview with the AUSAs who run the classroom portion of the course; interview with the New Haven District Attorney's Office for those interested in the state prosecutor's office.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Note: The first class meeting will be on January 18, 3:30-5:20 p.m., in room 124 at the Law School. Thereafter, the class will meet at the U.S. Attorney's Office.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20171

    Close
    • 21107-01
    • Law, Environment and Religion: A Communion of Subjects
    • Kysar
      Tucker
      Grim
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 to 3
    • -
    • faculty permission (8)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Law, Environment, and Religion: A Communion of Subjects (21107). 2 or 3 units. Thomas Berry once wrote, “The universe is a communion of subjects, not a collection of objects.” One might also insist that the university is a communion of subjects, not a collection of disciplines. Perhaps no subject better illustrates this point than the environment, for to understand and appreciate the environment requires expertise from multiple intellectual traditions, including history, religion, philosophy, anthropology, aesthetics, economics, political science, and legal studies.

    This course will focus on the scholarship and practice of leading figures working at the intersection of law, environment, and religion, who will be brought to campus to participate in a discussion series that will form the core of the course. In preparation for these visits, teams of students will be assigned to study deeply the writing and actions of a designated speaker. Class sessions during this preparatory phase will resemble a traditional graduate seminar, with readings and discussion designed to stimulate engagement with the most challenging and vital questions facing the “communion” of law, environment, and religion. During the core phase of the course, speakers will interact with students in multiple ways. The central activity will be an in-depth interview led by members of the student team.

    Other students will conduct a podcast interview with the speaker at Yale’s audio recording studio; these podcast interviews, which are intended to engage the speaker in a more personal conversation about his or her life history, values, and worldviews, will be posted on Yale's iTunes University site. One of the conceits of the academy is often that such subjective elements have little bearing on one’s intellectual work. As a result, too little attention is paid within the university to the role of family, community, religion, and other critical biographical factors in shaping one’s ideas. Enrollment limited to twenty-four, of which eight places are for Law students. Permission of the instructors required. Also F&ES 808b/REL 926b. D. Kysar, J.A. Grim, M.E. Tucker.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should email a CV and brief statement of interest to jennifer.marshall@yale.edu by December 8 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Students must attend the first meeting of the course in order to stay enrolled.

    Location: PR77 - A001 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20128

    Close
    • 30167-01
    • Advanced Ethics Bureau at Yale
    • Fox
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Ethics Bureau (30167). 3 units. This course is for students who have already taken either the Ethics Bureau at Yale clinic or the instructor’s course, Traversing the Legal Minefield, and who wish to contribute further to the work of the Bureau. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. L. Fox.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20083

    Close
    • 21343-01
    • Advanced Legal Writing
    • Harrison
    • Tue 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • limited enrollment (10)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Writing (21343). 3 units. This course will explore the theory and practice of drafting legal memoranda and briefs. Students will have the opportunity to refine analytical as well as writing skills. The goal of the course will be to take students beyond basic competence to excellence in legal writing. Enrollment limited to ten. R.D. Harrison.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20111

    Close
    • 21782-01
    • Advanced Sociology of Law Research Seminar
    • Kohler-Hausmann
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission (6)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Advanced Sociology of Law Research Seminar (21782). 3 units. Research and writing on topics in the sociology of law. Topics to be arranged with instructor. Prerequisite: Sociology of Law Seminar. Paper required. Enrollment limited to six. Permission of the instructor required. I. Kohler-Hausmann.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students interested in registering for this course should submit topic statements by the close of the bidding period on December 8 at 4:30 pm.

    Note: The meeting times wil be arranged once the instructor has selected students for the seminar.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24114

    Close
    • 21204-01
    • Bankruptcy
    • Janger
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Bankruptcy (21204). 3 units. An introduction to the law of bankruptcy. It explores the relief available to individual and business debtors in financial distress as well as the remedies available to creditors. The focus will be on the federal Bankruptcy Code and state laws governing the enforcement of judgments. Among the topics covered: who is eligible for bankruptcy relief; the nature and scope of the bankruptcy discharge; what property may be claimed as exempt; priorities among creditors; interplay of bankruptcy and non-bankruptcy laws; the role and powers of bankruptcy judges and bankruptcy trustees, negotiating and confirming a plan of reorganization. Enrollment capped at forty. Self-scheduled examination. E. Janger.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Mon)
    SLB - 120 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 22042
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30161-01
    • Capital Punishment Clinic
    • Bright
      Parrent
      Sanneh
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Capital Punishment Clinic (30161). 6 units (3 fall, 3 spring), credit/fail in the fall term with the option of graded credit in the spring. Students will gain firsthand experience in capital defense, working as part of a team representing indigent defendants facing the death penalty in cases being handled by the Southern Center for Human Rights in Atlanta, the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, or Connecticut Public Defenders. Projects and case assignments will vary according to the position of each clinic case in the process, but all projects will require legal research, analysis and writing, strategy meetings with team members, and preparation for appellate arguments and may include interviews with clients or witnesses. Students will complete at least one substantial writing assignment, such as a portion of a motion, brief, or memorandum of law. Opportunity for summer travel to the South to conduct research and investigation with the Southern Center for Human Rights or the Equal Justice Initiative is available but not required. Students enroll in the fall term and continue in the spring. In rare and exceptional cases, a student may be admitted for the spring term. The course is limited to students who have taken Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, Disadvantage or plan to take it in the spring term. (Students who have taken Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, Disadvantage will be given priority in admission.) Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. S.B. Bright, A. Parrent, and S. Sanneh.

    Course Bidding Information: If you are a new student who wishes to apply, you should list this course among experiential course selections. In addition, you should submit a statement of interest that describes why you would like to take this clinic; whether you will have sufficient time to devote to the clinic; past work experience (including summer work between years of law school); and what you expect or would like to do upon graduation, as well as your CV. If you have not taken the Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, Disadvantage class, please provide an example of your legal analysis and writing. Statements and other materials must be sent directly to Professor Bright (stephen.bright@yale.edu) by December 8 at 4:30 p.m. You may also upload a second copy of your submission through the YLS:Courses bidding system.

    Students continuing from the fall term should list this clinic among their experiential course selections; list the course as the lowest bid among these selections. No statement of interest is required of students continuing in the clinic for a second or subsequent term.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20057

    Close
    • 21154-01
    • Competition Economics and Policy
    • Scott Morton
    • Mon 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
      Wed 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Competition Economics, and Policy (21154). 3 units. The course will start by describing the economics underlying the U.S. antitrust laws. We will then analyze competitive behaviors that courts and agencies have determined form the boundary for legality under antitrust law. We start with cartels, continue on to mergers, and spend the second half of the semester on unilateral conduct (monopolization). We will learn the economics underlying the strategies chosen by firms and analytical methods needed to assess their impact on competition. We will discuss the evidence and arguments that have been used to determine liability. The course will cover mainly the goals and procedures of the U.S. but also the EU antitrust agencies. We will welcome a few guests over the semester who are practitioners in the field. Students will choose a case (from a limited set) and a side to argue in front of the class. This course will follow the School of Management calendar. Prerequisite: intermediate microeconomics or equivalent economics background (discuss with the instructor if you are not sure). Examination required. F. Scott Morton.

    Note: The final examination will be a closed-book exam covering all the material in the course. It will take place on the last day of the class.

    Course Selection: To be admitted to the class, all interested students must complete a short assignment that will be available at the start of the semester.

    Location: EVANS - 4430 (Mon)
    EVANS - 4430 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20166
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21448-01
    • Criminal Procedure: Police Practices and Investigations
    • Meares
    • Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment (0)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Procedure: Police Practices and Investigations (21448). 3 units. The course will focus on the constitutional law that governs searches, seizures, and confessions. The course will consider in detail the evolution of the exclusionary rule and the development and administration of the probable cause and warrant requirements. It will also examine stop and frisk, administrative searches, searches incident to arrest, vehicle searches, consent searches, and the admissibility of confessions. No credit/fail option. Enrollment capped at seventy-five. Scheduled examination. T. Meares.

    Note: Attendance at the first three classes is required to hold a place in the class or on the waiting list.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Wed)
    SLB - 120 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20206
    Exam: 5/03/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21217-01
    • Criminal Procedure: Adjudication
    • Duke
    • Tue 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Procedure: Adjudication (21217). 3 units. This course will cover pre-trial proceedings, pleabargaining, right to trial by jury, effective assistance of counsel, joinder and severance, right of confrontation, prosecutorial discretion, some trial proceedings, and double jeopardy. Class participation is expected and may be taken into account in grading. Students who regularly do not attend will be dropped from the class. Criminal Procedure: Investigation is not a prerequisite. Scheduled examination. S.B. Duke.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Tue)
    SLB - 122 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20065
    Exam: 5/05/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21525-01
    • Criminal Law
    • Rubenfeld
    • Wed 1:10 PM-2:35 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • Criminal Law & Administration
    • faculty permission (75)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Law (21525). 3 units. An introduction to criminal law. Topics to be considered in detail include the law of homicide; the problem of intent and of criminal responsibility for unintended acts; the law of rape; the special constitutional requirements applicable to criminal law; and the insanity defense. This course is given in several sections; it must be taken before graduation. Students may satisfy the graduation requirement by satisfactorily completing Criminal Law and Administration or Criminal Law, but they may not enroll in both courses. Enrollment limited to fifty. Permission of the instructor required. Scheduled examination. J. Rubenfeld.

    Course Bidding: Students who bid “1” for the class will of course have priority. In case of oversubscription among people bidding “1” (or if there are spaces left after the 1’s get in), primary additional factors Professor Rubenfeld will take into account include: (a) being a third-year student and having a serious conflict with the other Criminal Law section; (b) having done research work for him in the past, especially on Criminal Law topics; and (c) having special interest in, or experience with, the subject.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Wed)
    SLB - 129 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20160
    Exam: 5/01/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21145-01
    • Due Process and Equal Protection: Advanced Constitutional Law
    • Franklin
    • Mon 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Due Process and Equal Protection: Advanced Constitutional Law (21145). 3 units. This advanced Constitutional Law course will examine in greater depth the two clauses of the Fourteenth Amendment that have played a central role in many of the most hotly contested legal, political, and social disputes in the United States. This course will briefly examine the early development of the Constitution's liberty guarantee and consider how it has evolved in more recent times in cases involving, among other things, abortion, gay rights, and the right to die. It will likewise examine the development of the Constitution's equal protection guarantee, primarily in cases involving race, sex, and sexual orientation discrimination and issues such as school integration, affirmative action, reproductive rights, and same-sex marriage. As we study these two lines of cases, we will consider how the meaning of the Constitution's liberty and equality guarantees has changed over time, and how lawyers and judges do--or should--apply these constitutional provisions to some of the most pressing legal controversies of the twenty-first century. Scheduled examination. C. Franklin.

    Location: BAKER - A005 (Mon)
    BAKER - A005 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20084
    Exam: 5/03/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30162-01
    • Education Adequacy Project
    • Rosen
      Knopp
      Moodhe
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Education Adequacy Project (30162). 3 units. The Education Adequacy Project (EAP) provides a unique opportunity for students to participate in and help lead institutional reform litigation. The EAP pursues a single complex lawsuit to ensure the State of Connecticut provides all Connecticut children with adequate and equitable educations. Students work with attorneys at Debevoise & Plimpton as well as local counsel in an integrated team. A four-month trial took place in the Spring of 2016, and as of this writing it is anticipated that the case will be in the post-trial and/or appellate stages during the spring semester. Students have to date played a significant role in determining the case's litigation strategy. Class time is devoted to litigation strategy and discussion with supervising attorneys; training in litigation skills; and internal clinic logistics.

    New students should be aware that the long trial and years of pretrial proceedings have created a massive record, and it will be difficult to become familiar with the case. However the clinic will accept a limited number of new students if they are exceptionally interested and eager to participate. Permission of the instructors required. D.N. Rosen, A.A. Knopp, J.P. Moodhe, and A. Taubes.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students should send a short e-mail describing their interest in the clinic by 4:30 p.m. on December 8.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20253

    Close
    • 21567-01
    • Election Law
    • Fishkin
    • Tue 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Election Law (21567). 3 units. This course will survey the law governing the American political process. We will examine the constitutional and statutory regimes that regulate our political institutions, the underlying principles that animate these regimes, and their dynamic interaction with contemporary politics. Our topics will include the individual right to participate, one-person-one-vote, the Voting Rights Act, political and racial gerrymandering, the regulation of political parties, and campaign finance. Scheduled examination. J.R. Fishkin.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Tue)
    SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20080
    Exam: 5/04/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Open book and open notes, but you may not consult outside sources, websites, or commercial outlines.

    Close
    • 21136-01
    • Employment and Labor Law
    • Jolls
    • Thu 11:10 AM-1:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Employment and Labor Law (21136). 3 units. This course will explore the major legal issues in the employment relationship. Topics include the Fair Labor Standards Act; collective organization of workers and other issues under the National Labor Relations Act; alternative processes for union organization in recent decades; legal rules governing workplace safety and health and major employee "fringe benefit" programs (pensions and health insurance); free speech rights of employees; legal rules governing genetic screening, drug testing, and other testing of employees; mandatory arbitration of employment disputes; unemployment insurance; the legal treatment of employee non-compete agreements; the Family and Medical Leave Act; and prohibitions on employment discrimination on the basis of race and other traits. The written work required for the course will be four four-page analytic essays, due over the course of the term, on the course concepts and materials, and a research paper that may be used in satisfaction of either the Supervised Analytic Writing requirement (in which case the course should be taken for 4 rather than 3 units) or the Substantial Paper requirement. Paper required. Enrollment limited. C. Jolls.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20114

    Close
    • 21033-01
    • Environmental Law and Policy
    • Esty
    • Mon 2:30 PM-3:50 PM
      Wed 2:30 PM-3:50 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Environmental Law and Policy (21033). 3 units. Introduction to the legal requirements and policy underpinnings of the basic U.S. environmental laws, including the Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, and various statutes governing waste, food safety, and toxic substances. This course will examine and evaluate current approaches to pollution control and resource management as well as the "next generation" of regulatory strategies, including economic incentives, voluntary emissions reductions, and information disclosure requirements. Mechanisms for addressing environmental issues at the local, regional, and global levels will also be considered. Scheduled examination. D.C. Esty.

    Note: This class will meet according to the calendar of the School of Environmental Studies.

    Note: This class is taught every year, but Professor Elliott and Professor Esty alternate years as instructors. Each instructor covers both law and policy, with Professor Elliott's version of the course geared primarily to law students while Professor Esty's course does not presume underlying legal knowledge.

    Location: WTS - A60 (Mon)
    WTS - A60 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20071
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30164-01
    • Environmental Protection Clinic: Policy and Advocacy
    • Galperin
      Suatoni
      Hawkins
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Environmental Protection Clinic: Policy and Advocacy (30164). 3 units, credit/fail. A clinical seminar in which students will be engaged with actual environmental law or policy problems on behalf of client organizations (environmental groups, government agencies, international bodies, etc.). The class will meet weekly, and students will work ten to twelve hours per week in interdisciplinary groups (with students from the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and other departments or schools at Yale) on projects with a specific legal or policy product (e.g., draft legislation or regulations, hearing testimony, analytic studies, policy proposals). Students may propose projects and client organizations, subject to approval by the instructor. Enrollment limited. Also F&ES 970b. J. Galperin, D. Hawkins, and L. Suatoni.

    Course Bidding: Students should contact Professor Galperin for a list of available projects and a description of the application process in order to complete all necessary steps, in addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, before December 8 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: First-day attendance is required. Students may not drop the clinic after they have been assigned to a client.

    Location: S - 24 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20085

    Close
    • 21469-01
    • Estate Planning: Estate, Gift, and Generation-Skipping Transfer Taxes and Related Income Tax Issues
    • Stoll
    • Wed 3:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Estate Planning: Estate, Gift, and Generation-Skipping Transfer Taxes and Related Income Tax Issues (21469). 3 units. The major focus of the class will be estate planning, i.e., understanding in depth the three transfer taxes (estate tax, gift tax, generation-skipping transfer tax) and the grantor trust rules, and learning how trusts and estates practitioners advise wealthy individuals to structure their estate plans to achieve particular tax and nontax goals. In addition, we will address issues related to estate administration and charitable giving. We will use as our primary text Federal Taxes on Gratuitous Transfers: Law and Planning by Joseph M. Dodge, Wendy C. Gerzog, and Bridget J. Crawford (Wolters Kluwer Law & Business 2011). Class materials will also include relevant sections of the Internal Revenue Code and Treasury Regulations thereunder, as well as a model Will, Revocable Trust, Dynasty Trust, Qualified Personal Residence Trust, Grantor Retained Annuity Trust, and private equity fund structure. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. D.J. Stoll.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20173
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30166-01
    • Ethics Bureau at Yale: Pro Bono Professional Responsibility Advice and Advocacy
    • Fox
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Ethics Bureau at Yale: Pro Bono Professional Responsibility Advice and Advocacy (30166). 3 units. Lawyers' need for ethics advice, consultation and expert opinions is not limited to those whose clients can pay. Impecunious clients and the lawyers who serve them are in need of ethics counseling and legal opinions on a regular basis. For example, Yale law students have provided essential assistance preparing amicus briefs in numerous Supreme Court cases. A few of these cases resulted in victory for the petitioner and citations to the amicus brief in the majority opinions.

    The work of the Bureau consists of four major components. First, the Bureau provides ethics counseling for pro bono organizations such as legal services offices, public defenders, and other NGO’s. Second, the Bureau prepares standard-of-care opinions relating to the conduct of lawyers, prosecutors and judges that are required in cases alleging ineffective assistance of counsel and other challenges to lawyer conduct. Third, from time to time, the Yale Ethics Bureau provides assistance to amici curiae, typically bar associations or ethics professors, on questions of professional responsibility in cases in which such issues are front and center. It did so in a United States Supreme Court case, Maples v. Allen, citing the amicus brief of the clinic. The clinic also prepared a brief for Williams v. Pennsylvania, with the brief cited by several Justices in oral arguments. Fourth, the Bureau provides ethics opinions for the National Association of Public Defenders, position papers for various American Bar Association entities, articles for law reviews and other publications, and editorials on topics of current interest.

    The fifteen students working at the Bureau meet for class two hours per week and are expected to put in approximately ten hours on Bureau projects each week. The classroom work explores the law governing lawyers, but also considers the role of expert witnesses in the litigation process, its appropriateness and the procedural issues thereby raised. No prerequisites. Preference given to prior Ethics Bureau enrollees and students who previously took the instructor’s ethics class. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. L. Fox.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among the experiential course selections, interested students should also submit a short statement of interest by the close of the bidding period on December 8 at 4:30 p.m. In the statement, students should describe their interest in participation in the ethics bureau and any relevant background.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is required. There is a no-drop policy for this course.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20082

    Close
    • 21210-01
    • Federal Courts
    • Dailey
    • Mon 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment (75)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal Courts (21210). 3 units. This course will look at the jurisdiction of the federal courts as established by Article III and congressional legislation, the relationship of the federal courts to the other branches of government, and the interplay of federal courts with the state judicial systems. It will include close consideration of the constitutional, statutory and judge-made doctrines that shape the jurisdiction of the federal courts in our system of government, as well as the historical context from which these doctrines emerged. Particular attention will be paid to the constitutional principles of federalism and the separation of powers, and to competing views of the normative role of federal courts - and courts generally - in a liberal democracy. A series of topics relating to federal courts will be examined, including congressional control over federal court jurisdiction; the constitutionality of legislative courts and military tribunals; Supreme Court review of state court decisions; removal and federal habeas corpus; federal question jurisdiction; federal common law; sovereign immunity and the eleventh amendment; actions against state governments; and abstention doctrines. Throughout the course, consideration will be given to the role of federal courts in interpreting and applying international law. No credit/fail option. Enrollment will be capped at seventy-five. Scheduled examination. A. Dailey.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Mon)
    SLB - 127 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20062
    Exam: 5/03/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21739-01
    • Federal Indian Law
    • Torres
    • Fri 10:10 AM-1:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Federal Indian Law (21739). 3 units. This course will cover the basics of federal Indian law. It will not address the substantive content of tribal law. Tribal law is a specialized study arising from the exercise of the legal authority that the tribes retain. This course is designed to lay the ground work for a deep understanding of what kinds of sovereignty Indian nations may exercise within the framework of our legal system.

    Normally, courses of this type begin with an historical exploration of the foundations of the relations between Indian and non-Indian peoples. Instead, we will begin with questions that are current and sketch out, roughly, where we are now. We will build from the present back to the origins to see how the doctrines reflect the positive aspects of the legal expression of contact between Europe and the native nations of the Western hemisphere as well as the more malign aspects. We will not neglect the history; it will prove critical for understanding the ways in which federal Indian law is sui generis in domestic jurisprudence, but we will see how that history is always haunted by the specter of colonialism, extra-legality, and finally international legal norms. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. G. Torres.

    Note The first meeting of this class will take place on Friday, January 27.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20251
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30211-01
    • Financial Markets and Corporate Law Clinic
    • Macey
      Fleming
      Beirne
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (20)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Financial Markets and Corporate Law Clinic (30211). 3 units. The purpose of this clinic will be to introduce students to public policy debates in the regulatory context. We will endeavor to apply public choice theory and modern theories in corporate finance to debates about the content of regulation and public policy. In this clinic, students and faculty will work collaboratively to generate actual comment letters as well as publishable academic research regarding proposed regulation by such institutions as the SEC, the Fed, the FDA, the Comptroller of the Currency, and others. In formulating policy statements, students will be encouraged to be cognizant of the value of markets and the need to improve the quality of public decision-making in areas related to the regulation of corporate governance and capital markets. Open only to J.D. students. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twenty. Permission of the instructors required. J.R. Macey, G. Fleming, and B.L. Beirne.

    Note: This clinic is open only to Law students in the J.D. program.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20138

    Close
    • 21757-01
    • [The] Foundations of Legal Scholarship
    • Klevorick
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission (6)
    • paper required
    Expand

    [The] Foundations of Legal Scholarship (21757). 3 units. During the second semester of the legal scholarship seminar, students will reflect on legal scholarship and workshop their own writing. Open only to Ph.D. in Law students and first-year J.S.D. students who completed Foundations of Legal Scholarship in Fall 2016. In all cases, enrollment in this semester of the seminar is only by permission of its instructors. Paper required. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructor required. A.K. Klevorick.

    Location: SLB - L48 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20120

    Close
    • 21744-01
    • Innovation in Government and Society
    • Braverman
    • Fri 8:30 AM-12:30 PM
      Thu 5:00 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission (6)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Innovation in Government and Society (21744). 3 units. Across the globe, communities of every size face the same urgent imperative: rising demand for services running headlong into the reality of limited resources. The emerging answer--from some unlikely places--is bold, rapid management innovation. These disruptive moves are transforming the 21st century state. Some of the most broadly applicable, cutting-edge innovations come from the edge: communities that believe they have no choice but to take bold risks. Others come from the most developed areas, which feel more pressure than ever to do more with less. This interdisciplinary course on Innovation in Government and Society will blend perspectives from management, public policy, and law in exploring why communities must innovate in the delivery of public services and how ideas from the public sector, private sector, and civil society are shaping the future of public management. The course will include hands-on work to help advance innovation in communities in developing countries or areas affected by natural disaster or war, in partnership with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). This course will meet according to the School of Management calendar. Enrollment limited to six law students. Permission of the instructor required. Also MGT 866b/GBLS 697b. E. Braverman.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission of the instructor selections, students should submit a short statement of interest and a resume by the close of the bidding period on December 8, at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: This course will meet on the following dates: January 27, February 9 and 10; March 2 and 3; April 13, 14, 27, 28, May 4.

    Location: EVANS - 4220 (Fri)
    EVANS - 4220 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23701

    Close
    • 21695-01
    • [The] Institutional Supreme Court
    • Greenhouse
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (30)
    • exam required
    Expand

    [The] Institutional Supreme Court (21695). 3 units. This course will examine the Supreme Court from the perspective of its institutional role and the behavior of its members. Since the aim is a better understanding of how constitutional law is made, our focus will be on the making, rather than on the substantive law. Readings will be drawn from current and past cases, briefs and argument transcripts as well as political science literature on judicial behavior, public opinion, the appointment process, and other topics. All students will take a self-scheduled, open-book examination. A limited number of students may receive permission to write a paper for additional credit. Enrollment limited to thirty, with preference given to first-year J.D. students. Self-scheduled examination. L. Greenhouse.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20102
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Notes: Note: This exam will be available the entire exam period.

    Close
    • 30170-01
    • International Refugee Assistance Project
    • Heller
      Finkbeiner
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    International Refugee Assistance Project (30170). 3 units. This seminar and practicum will introduce students to international refugee law, with an emphasis on fieldwork. Class sessions will combine project rounds with a consideration of the development and content of the international refugee legal regime, U.S. policy toward refugees, and the particulars of the Iraqi and Syrian refugee crises. Additionally, students will work in pairs under the supervision of private attorneys to provide legal representation to refugees in the Middle East in urgent humanitarian situations seeking resettlement in a safe third country. Guest lecturers will include practitioners and scholars in the field of refugee law. Permission of the instructor required. R. Heller and L. Finkbeiner.

    Note: Accepted students will be notified before the beginning of the term and they will be asked to confirm their commitment to this clinic. A no-drop policy will apply thereafter.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20249

    Close
    • 21722-01
    • Introduction to the Regulatory State
    • Eskridge
    • Mon 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment (100)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Introduction to the Regulatory State (21722). 3 units. This course is an introduction to the modern regulatory state, with an emphasis on legislation, administrative implementation, and statutory interpretation by judges as well as by agencies. Because of the focus on statutory interpretation, this course is a substitute for the advanced course in Legislation, but it is not a substitute for the advanced course in Administrative Law. Enrollment capped at ninety, with preference given to first-year J.D. students. Self-scheduled examination. W.N. Eskridge, Jr.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20077
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21234-01
    • [The] Law and Economics of Corporate Control
    • Schwartz
      Fraidin
    • Mon 6:10 PM-7:00 PM
      Tue 7:30 PM-9:30 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] Law and Economics of Corporate Control (21234). 3 units. This course, broadly speaking, will consider how the law regulating corporate governance, and the practices the law engenders, affect the market for corporate control. Topics will include the appropriate and actual role of boards and management as these affect merger and takeover activity; defensive tactics; shareholder rights; hedge fund activism; the role of private equity in the public company market; and executive compensation. Invited lawyers and investment bankers will present three recent deals that illustrate the concepts the course teaches. Readings will include cases, recent law and finance articles and the deal materials. The course is taught by a law professor and an attorney. The attorney, Stephen Fraidin, had been the senior corporate partner for M&A activity at Kirkland and Ellis and recently became Vice Chairman of Pershing Square Capital, a large hedge fund. The course grade will be based on the critique and on an examination, or a paper option with permission of the instructors. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also MGT 664b. A. Schwartz and S. Fraidin.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20163
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21022-01
    • The Law and Technology of Cyber Conflict
    • Hathaway
      Shapiro
      Feigenbaum
    • Wed 9:25 AM-11:15 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    [The] Law and Technology of Cyber Conflict (21022). 3 units. The second semester of this yearlong course will be a hands-on practicum in which students will write policy papers, develop the computational theory of cyber conflict, or design and prototype novel technology. These projects will be designed to address some of the critical research gaps that have hindered long-term development of effective policy and technological responses to cyber conflict, including issues such as cyber deterrence in operations short of war, corporate cyber espionage, cyber vandalism/ terrorism, international cyber regulation, and related free speech and privacy concerns. Specific project topics will be formulated based on the first semester’s explorations and in consultation with policymakers who work on issues of cyber security. Enrollment limited to twenty. Also CPSC 510b. O. Hathaway, J. Feigenbaum, S.J. Shapiro.

    Note: This course is open only to those students who were enrolled in the fall term. The course follows the Yale College calendar.

    Course Bidding: Students continuing from the fall term should list this course as their lowest preference among permission-of-the-instructor selections.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20112

    Close
    • 30191-01
    • Legal Assistance
    • Dineen
    • Fri 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (8)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Legal Assistance (30191). 3 units, credit/fail. A clinical seminar, using classroom, field work, and simulation experiences in the general area of legal assistance for the poor. Students will work eight to twelve hours per week in a local legal aid office and will attend weekly classroom sessions. The seminar will be practice-oriented, moving from developing solutions for specific client problems to general discussions of landlord-tenant, consumer, domestic relations, welfare, and other legal subjects of special concern to the urban poor, as well as issues of broader social policy. The seminar will also focus on the development of professional responsibility and lawyering skills, such as interviewing, negotiating, counseling, drafting, and litigation. A few placements for criminal defense work in state court will also be available. Enrollment limited to six to eight. F.X. Dineen.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic andany of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.

    Location: NHLAO - CONF (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20250

    Close
    • 21638-01
    • Legal Profession: Traversing the Ethical Minefield
    • Fox
    • Mon 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • limited enrollment (25)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Legal Profession: Traversing the Ethical Minefield (21638). 3 units. Many law school courses make you better able to help your clients fulfill their hopes and dreams. This course is designed to help you fulfill your own professional obligations while also providing services to your clients consistent with the fiduciary obligations to which they are entitled. Through the use of hypothetical problems grounded in the real world, the class will explore many of the challenging dilemmas that confront the conscientious lawyer who wants to conform his or her conduct to the applicable rules of professional conduct and other law governing lawyers. At the same time we will consider whether the present rules of professional conduct properly address the issues with which the profession must grapple in striking delicate balances among the obligations of lawyers vis-à-vis clients, lawyers as officers of the court and lawyers as citizens. The class will use a casebook, Susan Martyn & Lawrence Fox, Traversing the Ethical Minefield, and a standards book, Susan Martyn, Lawrence Fox & Brad Wendel, The Law Governing Lawyers. Class attendance and participation are essential. Enrollment capped at twenty-five.Scheduled examination. L. Fox.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    SLB - 121 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20081
    Exam: 5/03/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21113-01
    • Legal History Colloquium and Research
    • Priest
    • Tue 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (18)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Legal History Colloquium and Research (21113). 3 units. This course will have three components. One component of the class will involve reading and discussing legal history works and primary materials examining the foundations of the American legal, political, and economic order from the colonial period through the early twentieth century, including the Founding, the Constitution, and judicial review, as well as slavery, women’s legal history, and corporate law. A second component of the class will involve attending the spring semester’s sessions of the Legal History Forum, which occur during classtime, and students will submit short writing responses for each presentation. A third component of the class will involve developing independent student research. Students may take the course for an additional credit, and course papers may be eligible for Substantial or Supervised Analytic Writing credit. Graduate School Students may participate with the permission of the instructor. Paper required. Enrollment limited to eighteen. Also HIST 990b. C. Priest.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23702

    Close
    • 21777-01
    • Meritocracy and Inequality: Seminar
    • Markovits
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission (6)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Meritocracy and Inequality: Seminar (21777). 3 units. American meritocracy was conceived, at the middle of the last century, as a mechanism for opening the elite to outsiders and promoting fair equality of opportunity. Today, it is far from clear that meritocracy performs this function and more than plausible that meritocracy has become a principal obstacle to equality of opportunity. Students interested in the social, moral, and economic analysis of meritocracy are invited to submit proposals for supervised research on the relationship between meritocracy and equality, in any of its myriad forms. The final number of credits may vary by agreement with the instructor and framing of suitable work plans. Paper required. Enrollment limited to six. Permission of the instructor required. D. Markovits.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should submit a CV and a one-paragraph statement explaining the interest in this course. Materials should be submitted by December 8 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20141

    Close
    • 21678-01
    • Military Justice
    • Fidell
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Military Justice (21678). 3 units. This course will explore the character and function of military justice today. Topics will include the constitutional rights of military personnel; court-martial jurisdiction and offenses; trial and appellate structure and procedure; collateral review; the roles of commanders, Congress, the Supreme Court, and the President; unlawful command influence; the role of custom; and punishment. Current issues such as the treatment of sexual offenses, military commissions, government contractors and other civilians, command accountability, military justice on the battlefield, judicial independence, and the application of international human rights norms to military justice will be addressed. The class will consider issues of professional responsibility, how the military justice system can be improved, and what, if anything, can be learned from the experience of other countries. The primary text will be Fidell, Hillman & Sullivan, Military Justice: Cases and Materials (LexisNexis, 2d ed., 2012). Self-scheduled examination. Also GLBL 598b E. R. Fidell.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20078
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30186-01
    • Open Government and Open Data Governance Innovation Clinic
    • Noveck
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • paper required
    Expand

    Open Government and Open Data Governance Innovation Clinic (30186). 3 units, credit/fail with a graded option. The Open Government and Open Data Governance Innovation Clinic supports the strengthening of democratic institutions by using legal and technological innovations to transform how we govern. In this clinic, we will work with clients in government and other public institutions on projects designed to enable them to work more openly and collaboratively to make better decisions and solve public problems to improve people’s lives. Our mission is three-fold: to help institutions innovate and become more effective at achieving their mission through the application of new technologies including big data and collective intelligence; to promote the public’s right to participate in governing in ways that tap people’s talents, creativity, and interests; and to empower twenty-first-century lawyers-as-problem solvers by developing new skills in governance innovation. Paper required. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. B.S. Noveck.

    Note: Additional information about the projects for this clinic is available at link text.

    Course Bidding: In addition to ranking this clinic among experiential course selections, students should also submit a CV and a short statement of interest by the close of the bidding period, December 8, 4:30 p.m.

    Note: To enable this policy clinic to accomplish as much as possible, Professor Noveck wants to organize project teams at the start of the term. Hence students accepted into the clinic will be asked to commit by January 9, 2017 and drops will not be approved thereafter. Students who have questions about the clinic should not hesitate to reach out to Professor Noveck (beth.noveck@yale.edu).

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20178

    Close
    • 21582-01
    • Partnership Taxation
    • Cunningham
    • Mon 10:10 AM-1:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Partnership Taxation (21582). 3 units. This course will examine the federal income tax consequences arising from the operation of an enterprise that is treated as a partnership for tax purposes. Topics include the allocation of partnership income and deductions among partners as well as the various problems created by contributions, distributions, and acquisitions and dispositions of partnership interests. Scheduled examination. N. Cunningham.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20076
    Exam: 5/03/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21408-01
    • [The] Philosophy of Law II
    • Yaffe
    • Wed 10:10 AM-11:35 AM
      Fri 10:10 AM-11:35 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (25)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    [The] Philosophy of Law II (21408). 3 units. This course concerns philosophical topics that arise in connection with particular areas of law. Such topics include the justification of criminal punishment; discrepancy in punishment of attempted and completed crimes; the relevance of ignorance of the law to criminal responsibility; self-defense and other forms of preventive violence; the rationale for double-jeopardy restrictions; the conception of justice of import to tort law; the concepts of causation and intention in tort law; the relationship between promises and contracts; the fundamental rationale for property rights; the grounds for and nature of the individualization of the reasonable person standard; the rationale for variations in standards of proof across areas of law. A selection of such topics will be examined through consideration of both philosophical essays written about them and legal materials that bear on them. Enrollment limited to twenty-five. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also PHIL 715b. G. Yaffe.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    SLB - 124 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20188

    Close
    • 21071-01
    • Quantitative Corporate Finance
    • Ayres
    • Tue 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Quantitative Corporate Finance (21071). 3 units. This course will introduce students to some of the fundamentals of financial economics. Topics will include net present values, the capital asset pricing model, the efficient capital market hypotheses, event studies, and option theory. Students will need to learn to use electronic spreadsheet software such as Excel. Grades will be based on weekly computer problem sets and on an open-book final examination. Self-scheduled examination. Also MGT 692b. Ayres.

    Note: After the first class meeting, please email Professor Ayres a disclosure (subject line: QF Disclosure) indicating your prior experience or exposure (in school, on the job, etc.) with any of the following course topics: Discounting cash flows, NPV, IRR, CAPM, ECMH, event students, options, Excel.

    Location: BAKER - A420 (Tue)
    BAKER - A420 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20053
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30226-01
    • Reproductive Rights and Justice Project
    • Smith
      Kraschel
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Reproductive Rights and Justice Project (30226). 3 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option. Students in this project will gain firsthand experience in fast-paced litigation and timely and strategic advocacy in a highly contested area of the law, confronting knotty procedural problems as well as substantive constitutional law questions in an area where established doctrine is under siege. Students will advocate for clients who are often vilified by opponents as well as some members of the press and judiciary, learning the vital importance of client confidentiality, as well as the impact of political movement strategy and management of press and public messaging. Enrollment limited to eight to twelve. Permission of the instructors required. P.J. Smith, K. Kraschel.

    For litigation matters, students will work in small teams representing reproductive health care providers and/or patients in cases being handled by attorneys at Planned Parenthood Federation of America, the Center for Reproductive Rights, or the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project. Projects and case assignments will vary according to the posture of the cases, but all will require top-notch legal research, analysis and writing, as well as strategy meetings with team members. Some cases will involve trial level work, including informal fact development, drafting pleadings, discovery, motion practice, and negotiations. Other matters will involve appellate briefing.

    Students will also have an opportunity to develop non-litigation skills by undertaking non-litigation matters involving legislative and regulatory advocacy, public education, and strategic planning, at the federal, state, and local level. Some ongoing matters developed outside the project will be carried into the project, including research and development of model legislation to protect reproductive rights at the state level, the appropriate constitutional standards to be applied in challenges to restrictions on the provision of reproductive health services, including abortion and contraception, in light of Planned Parenthood v. Casey, and Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, and additional projects involving preparation for future litigation on the state and national level or other policy projects promoting access to reproductive health care, the details of which cannot be disclosed because they involve privileged matters.

    Students will be assigned in small teams to work on one litigation matter and one non-litigation matter each. Supervision of the litigation will be conducted by the attorneys at the national organizations, with assistance from course instructors. Non-litigation matters will be supervised by the course instructors with input from those at national organizations where appropriate.

    Note: Open only to U.S. J.D. students.

    Course Bidding: Students should submit a statement of interest and a copy of their resumes to Professors Smith (Priscilla.smith@yale.edu) and Kraschel (Katie.kraschel@gmail.com) by January 6, 2017. In the statement, please indicate how you would have ranked this experiential course if it had been posted during the December bidding period. Priority will be given to applicants with past experience in the substantive law of reproductive rights and justice, either through coursework or work experience, as well as to some with a demonstrated commitment to this as a new practice area. All other things being equal, preference will be given to those qualified students who rank the clinic as their first choice and to third-year students.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 24431

    Close
    • 21496-01
    • Social Science and Institutional Design: The Empirical Evaluation of Legal Policies and Practices
    • Tyler
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Social Science and Institutional Design: The Empirical Evaluation of Legal Policies and Practices (21496). 3 units. This course will be concerned with the potential role of social science in designing legal institutions, i.e., creating laws and developing policies and practices for the authorities who implement them. It will consider the role of social science models of human cognition and motivation in the effort to best meet the goals of the legal system. For each class two or three students will write a short position paper (1 or 2 pages) on the readings for that week. In some cases, when there are several topics covered, the students can choose the one they want to write about. The position paper will raise what each student feels are core questions about the readings of the week. Each student will then give a brief presentation of the position paper at the beginning of the class. Grading based on either a 20-30 page paper on some topics of the material or on a self-scheduled examination. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also PSYC 647b. T. Tyler.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20175
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30180-01
    • Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic
    • Greenhouse
      Pincus
      Rothfeld
      Kimberly
      Hughes
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (12)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Supreme Court Advocacy (30180). 6 units (3 fall, 3 spring). This course is a continuation of the fall clinic and is open only to those who have completed the clinic's fall term. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of instructors required. L. Greenhouse, P. Hughes, M. Kimberly, A. Pincus, and C. Rothfeld.

    Note: This course is open only to J.D. students.

    Course Bidding Information: Only continuing students should list this course among their experiential course selections, using their lowest priority. No new students will be accepted for the spring.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20107

    Close
    • 21160-01
    • U.S. Foreign Policy and the Law
    • Gewirtz
      Sullivan
    • Mon 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    U.S. Foreign Policy and the Law (21160). 3 units. This course will examine U.S. foreign policy decision-making, including the role of domestic and international law. It will cover a series of case studies, contemporary and historical, and focus on the perspective of those who make and implement U.S. foreign policy: How is policy developed? What constraints do policymakers face? How are intersecting issues of policy and law addressed and resolved? Jake Sullivan, most recently the senior policy advisor for Hillary Clinton’s presidential bid and formerly the Secretary of State’s Deputy Chief of Staff and Director of Policy Planning, Deputy Assistant to President Obama and National Security Advisor to Vice President Biden, is co-teaching the course. Grade will be based on class participation and the final examination or paper. Enrollment limited to thirty. Scheduled examination or paper option. P. Gewirtz and J.J. Sullivan.

    Course Bidding: In addition to ranking this course among limited enrollment bids, interested students should also submit a statement of interest and a CV by December 8 at 4:20 p.m.

    Note: No drops will be permitted after the final day of the add/drop period. First-day class attendance is required.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24148
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21100-01
    • U.S. International Taxation
    • Samuels
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment (25)
    • exam required
    Expand

    U.S. International Taxation (21100). 3 units. This course will cover the basic principles of U.S. international income taxation. We will examine how the United States taxes both so-called (1) inbound transactions (income earned by foreign persons from investing and doing business in the United States), and (2) outbound transactions (income earned by U.S. persons from business activities and investments outside the United States). The principal focus of the course will be on how the United States taxes income earned by U.S. corporations from doing business outside the United States. Topics will include the foreign tax credit; the controlled foreign corporation rules; transfer pricing; and income tax treaties. We will also consider international tax planning strategies currently used by U.S. multinational corporations, including so-called "inversion," and explore recently proposed changes to U.S. international tax law and policy. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. Enrollment capped at twenty-five. Self-scheduled examination. J.M. Samuels.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20161
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21430-01
    • White Collar Criminal Defense: Critical Issues and Strategies
    • Stith
      Zornow
    • Fri 9:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    White Collar Criminal Defense: Critical Issues and Strategies (21430). 3 units. This course will consider the legal, ethical and strategic challenges facing white-collar criminal defense lawyers, both those representing individuals and those representing entities, in this era of few trials and pressure to cooperate with the government. We will examine all stages of white-collar representations, including the financial and psychological dimensions of being retained; developing information (through internal investigations and otherwise) and controlling the flow of information to the prosecutor and other defense counsel (including through joint defense agreements); persuading prosecutors not to bring charges; negotiating with the prosecutor for immunity or cooperation agreements for individuals and corporations (including deferred prosecution agreements); assertions of the Fifth Amendment privilege; the tension between individual and corporate representations; plea or trial strategies (including the use of jury consultants) and approaches to sentencing; and parallel proceedings (including investigations by the SEC, state AGs, foreign law enforcement authorities, and private civil litigation). We will consider how the defense lawyer can succeed in disproving Dylan's observation that “you can't win with a losing hand.” Students must have taken at least one course in criminal law or criminal procedure. Regular “response” or "hypothetical" papers will be required throughout the term. Permission of the instructor required. K. Stith and D. Zornow.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, each applicant must provide no more than 200 words explaining his or her classroom and real-world experience (if any) with criminal law/procedure and with white collar criminal investigations/prosecutions/civil regulatory regimes and how this seminar would contribute to their academic and/or professional goals and interests. These statements should be submitted through the online system by 4:30 p.m. on December 8.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20172

    Close
    • 21483-01
    • The American Law of Slavery
    • Carter
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] American Law of Slavery (21483). 3 units. Enslavement in the American South was enabled in part by statutes, but much more by interaction of the "peculiar institution" with the existing principles of common law and rules of evidence and procedure. We will study all of these as we seek to understand the legal regime under which it was possible to have ownership rights in what Aristotle called "thinking property." Our purpose is to gain an appreciation of the actual interaction of law with the day-to-day practice of owners and the lives of those they enslaved. In addition to completing a paper or taking an examination, each student will take part in an in-class presentation on the way that the existence of slavery interacted with a particular common law rule. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. S.L. Carter.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20197
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30182-01
    • Criminal Justice Reform: Theory and Research in Action
    • Tyler
      Quattlebaum
      Meares
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3 or 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Criminal Justice Reform: Theory and Research in Action (30182). 3 units. We are at a pivotal moment with respect to American policing (and arguably the U.S. criminal justice system more generally). Police shootings in Ferguson, North Charleston, Cleveland, and Cincinnati —as well as the death of Eric Garner after police put him in a chokehold in Staten Island and the death of Freddie Gray after he was transported in a police van in Baltimore—have brought national attention to the questions of how police should do their jobs and even how that job should be defined. Perhaps at no point since the 1960’s, when the Kerner Commission wrote an influential report on American policing following a period of widespread urban unrest, have long-held assumptions about the purposes and methods of policing been called so deeply into question. Academics and researchers can and should be a part of the conversation about how to make policing (and all of the components of criminal justice operation) simultaneously more effective, just, and democratic.

    Participants in this workshop will explore theories (procedural justice, legitimacy, social network analysis, implicit bias, among others) and empirical findings that are being marshaled to re-think the function and form of policing. They will also engage in research projects and public policy advocacy that aim to give these ideas practical effect. Our immodest goal is that participants should have an opportunity to help define the face of American policing in the 21st century. We meet weekly; preparation and attendance at these discussions are required for credit. If you need to miss a class, please be in touch with the professors in advance of the meeting. Students missing more than two sessions without permission will not receive credit. Graded credit may be available to students who wish to write papers (including Substantial Papers and Supervised Analytic Writing papers) in connection with this course. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors is required. T. Meares, T.R. Tyler, and M. Quattlebaum.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should submit a one-paragraph statement of why they would like to join the workshop and what they hope to get out of the course. Students who have worked on the project in previous terms should indicate that experience in their statement. Statements should be submitted by December 8 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: In addition to the regular meeting time, students accepted in this workshop should hold Monday from 4 pm until 5 pm for supervision meetings for their experiential work.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20176

    Close
    • 30174-01
    • Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic
    • Metcalf
      Bjerregaard
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3 or 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30174). 3 or 4 units. Open only to students who have completed the Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. H.R. Metcalf and A. Bjerregaard.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections. In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students wishing to enroll in the advanced clinic must submit (1) a brief statement (less than 250 words) of the goals they would like to achieve in the Clinic during the semester and (2) a list of all significant commitments, including extracurricular activities, externships, work, and other clinics, during the semester. These materials should be submitted through the bidding system by 4:30 p.m. on December 8.

    Note: Students may not drop the Advanced Lowenstein Clinic after the first day of the semester.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20168

    Close
    • 30175-01
    • Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic
    • Schulz
      Balkin
      Langford
      Bloch-Wehba
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3 or 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic (30175). 3 or 4 units, credit/fail for students in their first semester, graded for students in their second semester. Students in the clinic will work on all aspects of cases involving press freedom, open government, free speech, and related issues. Clients include investigative journalists, traditional and new media organizations, activists, advocacy organizations, researchers and academics. Pending matters typically include litigation under the First Amendment and Freedom of Information laws in both federal and state courts. The clinic's cases involve a diverse array of issues, focusing in particular on national security, surveillance, privacy, technology and government accountability. Students may also have the opportunity to engage in non-litigation advocacy and client counseling. The seminar will focus on substantive law, case discussions, skills training, and ethical issues. Students will have the opportunity to write related research papers. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. D. Schulz, J.M. Balkin, H. Block-Webha, and J.T. Langford.

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who list this course among their experiential course selections should also submit a statement of interest and a CV to the instructor (jack.balkin@yale.edu) by December 8, at 4:30 p.m. Students should also indicate if they have previously applied to the course.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is mandatory for admitted students and for those on the waiting list who wish to remain in consideration for admission if a place becomes available. Admitted students must confirm their participation in advance of the first class by a date designated by the instructors.

    Location: BAKER - A422 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20165

    Close
    • 21077-01
    • A Community of Equals
    • Fiss
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    A Community of Equals (21077). 4 units. Should the law be used for eradicating patterns of inequalities that mark American society and if so, how? The inequalities that are the subject of this seminar and the required research papers will be defined broadly, including those based on race, class, gender, sexual orientation, language, nationality, disability, or immigration status. Special attention will be given in our weekly meetings, however, to the recent assaults on the Second Reconstruction by the Supreme Court and the manifold practices, including mass incarceration, inner city policing, barriers to employment, school assignment policies, ghettoization, and interferences with voting rights, that have led to the emergence and perpetuation of the black underclass. Enrollment limited. O.M. Fiss.

    Course Bidding:If the seminar is oversubscribed: (1) Twelve students will be chosen on a random basis from those listing the seminar as a first choice; (2) the remaining number of students will be selected from those first-choice bidders who submit a one-page memorandum indicating some special background or special interest with the subject matter of the seminar. The syllabus for this seminar has been posted and the instructor strongly urges that it be read before bidding for the course. If Spring 2016 is any indication, the seminar is likely to be oversubscribed and bidding for a seminar you are not likely to take unfortunately limits the opportunities available for your classmates.

    Note: The link to the syllabus for this seminar appears next to the course description in YLS:Courses if you are logged in. Attendance at all class meetings is required.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24139

    Close
    • 21601-01
    • Administrative Law
    • Parrillo
    • Tue 2:05 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:05 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment (150)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Administrative Law (21601). 4 units. There are vast areas of life in which much (often most) lawmaking and legal interpretation fall to administrative agencies, rather than to legislators and judges. Examples include the functioning of markets in securities, telecommunications, and energy; the safety of food, drugs, cars, airplanes, and workplaces; the regulation of pollution, public land use, advertising, immigration, election campaigns, and union organizing; and the distribution of all kinds of social welfare benefits. This course will introduce the legal and practical foundations of the administrative state, considering rationales for delegation to administrative agencies, procedural and substantive constraints on agency rulemaking and adjudication, judicial review of agency actions, and the relationship of agencies to Congress and the President. Self-scheduled examination. N. Parrillo.

    Note: As with law courses generally, enrollment for this course is limited by the capacity of the law school's largest classroom (150 students). In two previous instances, enrollment in this course was near that limit. If the number of students who express interest in this course exceeds that capacity, allocation of seats will take into account both the expressed weighted interest and the year in law school; seats on the waiting list will take into accout these same factors.

    Note: Although the examination is self-scheduled, because of the expected size of the class, all examinations for this course must be submitted by 12:30 pm on Tuesday, May 9.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20148
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/09/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30111-01
    • Advanced Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic
    • Gohara
      Shaffer
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic (30111). 4 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option. Open only to students who have completed the Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic and were enrolled in the Advanced EOJJ Clinic in Fall 2016. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. M. Gohara and E. Shaffer.

    Note: The instructors will coordinate a weekly meeting time once students have their schedules set.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should use their lowest priority among experiential course selections. No new students will be accepted for the spring term.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 24129

    Close
    • 21068-01
    • Antitrust
    • Priest
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Antitrust (21068). 4 units. This course will survey the law and economics of antitrust, including horizontal agreements, monopolization, and vertical arrangements. The course will presume students to have no training in economics, but it will aspire to remain of interest to students with substantial economics backgrounds. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. G.L. Priest.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20153
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21418-01
    • Business Organizations
    • Morley
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Business Organizations (21418). 4 units. This course will survey the law of business organizations with an emphasis on publicly traded corporations. The course will consider conflicts among shareholders and between shareholders and managers. We will survey the powers and duties of boards of directors and controlling shareholders and will address basic elements of finance as well as mergers and acquisitions, proxy fights and insider trading. We will pay particular attention to Delaware corporate law. We will also consider aspects of the law of agency and partnership. Self-scheduled examination. J.D. Morley.

    Note: This course is open only to Law students.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20144
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21426-01
    • Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, and Disadvantage
    • Bright
    • Mon 10:10 AM-1:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • faculty permission (35)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, and Disadvantage (21426). 4 units, graded, with a credit/fail option. This course will examine issues of poverty and race in the criminal justice system, particularly with regard to the imposition of the death penalty. Topics will include the right to counsel for people who cannot afford lawyers, racial discrimination, prosecutorial discretion, judicial independence, and mental health issues. Paper required. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to thirty-five. S.B. Bright.

    Course Bidding Information: If you are interested in the class, in addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, you should submit a CV and a statement describing why you would like to take the course; what you have done at every job and full-time intereship, fellowship, volunteer position you have had; your employment or internship plans for the summer of 2017; and your career plans. You are welcome to describe any other experiences or interests related to taking the class. Different perspectives on capital punishment and criminal justice issues are sought for the class. Send the statement by e-mail to stephen.bright@yale.edu. Students will be selected for the class upon review of their submissions. Statements must be submitted by December 8, 4:30 p.m. You may also upload a duplicate set of materials to the YLS:Courses bidding system.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20058

    Close
    • 21046-01
    • [The] Constitution: Philosophy, History, and Law
    • Ackerman
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] Constitution: Philosophy, History, and Law (21046). 4 units. An inquiry into the foundations of the American Constitution, at its founding and at critical moments in its historical transformation--most notably in response to the Civil War, the Great Depression, and the Civil Rights Movement. Philosophically speaking, do we still live under the Constitution founded by the Federalists, or are we inhabitants of the Second or Third or Nth Republic? Institutionally, in what ways are the patterns of modern American government similar to, and different from, those in post-Revolutionary (1787-1860) and post-Civil War (1868-1932) America? Legally, what is or was the role of constitutional law in the organization of each of these historical regimes? Through asking and answering these questions, the course will try to gain a critical perspective on the effort by the present Supreme Court to create a new constitutional regime for the twenty-first century. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also PLSC 842b. B. Ackerman.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20207
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 48 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21524-01
    • Corporate Taxation
    • Alstott
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Corporate Taxation (21524). 4 units. The United States has a "classical" or two-level corporate tax system, which aims to tax corporate income twice: once when earned at the corporate level and again when distributed to individual shareholders. This corporate "double tax" is problematic because its policy rationale is thin and its implementation is tricky. This course will focus on both the policy and the technical aspects of taxing corporations. On the policy side, it will consider current and past proposals to integrate the corporate tax with the individual income tax. On the technical side, it will consider the tax problems that arise when corporations engage in transactions with their shareholders or with other corporations, including contributions, distributions, and reorganizations. Note:This course is open only to J.D. students. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. Short paper required. Self-scheduled examination. A.L. Alstott.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Tue)
    SLB - 122 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20051
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21303-01
    • Criminal Law and Administration
    • Moore
    • Tue 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • Criminal Law & Administration
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Law and Administration (21303). 4 units. An introduction to criminal law and its underlying conceptual and moral structure, including theories of punishment, theories as to the proper reach of criminal legislation, the requisites of prima facie criminal responsibility, the defenses to liability, inchoate and group crimes, and the roles of legislature and courts in defining and prosecuting crime. This course is given in several sections; it must be taken before graduation. Students may satisfy the graduation requirement by satisfactorily completing Criminal Law and Administration or Criminal Law, but they may not enroll in both courses. Scheduled examination. M.S. Moore.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Tue)
    SLB - 122 (Thu)
    SLB - 129 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20143
    Exam: 5/04/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.5 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21220-01
    • [The] Development of the Western Legal Tradition
    • Whitman
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] Development of the Western Legal Tradition (21220). 4 units. This course will examine the rise and spread of the Western legal tradition, especially in the cultural centers of continental Europe. Topics discussed will include the development of the learned legal traditions of Roman and Canon law; the separation of law from religion in the Western world; relations between city and countryside; and the structures and eventual breakdown of social hierarchy. The course will also give some attention to the spread of Western legal forms and practices into Latin America and Asia. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. J.Q. Whitman.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20179
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30187-01
    • EnvironmentalProtectionClinic: Justice & Practice at Intersection of Civil Rights& the Environment
    • Lado
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Environmental Protection Clinic: Environmental Justice and Practice at the Intersection of Civil Rights and the Environment (30187). 4 units. Students will have the opportunity to help launch Yale Law School’s new environmental justice clinic and to develop a docket to improve environmental quality and public health in communities of color and low-income communities. In the wake of a national conversation about the water crisis in Flint and lead poisoning across the country, students will be in on the ground floor as the Clinic takes on cases to address inequality in the distribution of health hazards as well as procedural inequities faced by community members seeking to assert their own vision for the future of their neighborhoods, towns and cities. The clinic’s work will include cases and advocacy projects to enforce civil rights in the environmental context, working with clients to develop legal and advocacy strategies to reform EPA’s civil rights compliance and enforcement program and to address issues of environmental injustice in particular communities.

    Students will work in teams under faculty supervision and take responsibility for litigation and advocacy. Their activities will include the following:
    • Working directly with clients, co-counsel, opposing counsel, allies, environmental agencies, and EPA;
    • Developing case records by conducting factual investigation and working with experts;
    • Legal analysis, memos, pleadings and drafting other legal documents (such as public disclosure requests, comments on federal rules, etc.);
    • Representation of clients;
    • Negotiations and settlement.

    In addition to civil rights compliance and enforcement in the environmental context, the Clinic will evaluate potential litigation and advocacy to address the sources and impacts of air and water contamination in disproportionately affected communities, with a focus on communities in New England.

    Students will also participate in a seminar intended to explore issues raised by the clinical practice, including both substantive issues of environmental and civil rights law, as well as questions related to practice, including ethical and social dimensions of lawyering in this context. The seminar will meet approximately two hours per week. In addition to class meetings and preparation, clinic participants must complete and document approximately fifteen hours of clinical work per week. Students will also be expected to participate in weekly one-hour team meetings. While there is no prerequisite for the clinic, participants should have a strong interest in working on behalf of environmentally overburdened communities — often communities of color and low-income communities. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. Also F&ES 974b. M.E. Lado.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, Law students should submit a CV and a short statement expressing interest in the clinic, which will focus on environmental issues affecting communities of color and low-income communities and, particularly, civil rights enforcement in the environmental context, by uploading to the bidding system by December 8 at 4:30 p.m. The statement should be no more than one page in length. Non-Law students interested in the clinic should send a CV and one-page statement of interest to marianne.lado@gmail.com

    Note: First-day attendance is required unless permission for absence is granted by the instructor in advance of the first meeting.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 22044

    Close
    • 21277-01
    • Evidence
    • Carter
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Evidence (21277). 4 units. A survey of the United States' approach to the production of evidence. Although the major focus will be the Federal Rules of Evidence, the course will also study constitutional principles and philosophical arguments. We will do some comparative work as well. Scheduled examination. S.L. Carter.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 22040
    Exam: 5/04/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21002-01
    • Federal Courts and the Federal System
    • Purcell
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal Courts and the Federal System (21002). 4 units. The federal courts play central roles in the American judicial system as well as in the overall operations of American government on local, state, and national levels. Their history has tracked the nation's history; their practices and procedures have grown from that history; and the rules of law they articulated have helped shape that history. This course will examine the changing "law of the federal courts" and its relation to the political, social, economic, and ideological conflicts that have created contemporary America. It revolves around the fundamental constitutional principles of federalism and separation of powers, and it focuses on both the normatively proper and actually operative role of the national courts in American law and government. Among the broad topics it covers are the nature of the Article III judicial power, the lawmaking authority of the federal courts, the power of Congress over the national judicial system, the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court and the lower federal judiciary, the nature and scope of the Eleventh Amendment, statutory and other non-constitutional limitations on federal judicial power, the role of international law in the American legal system, and the authority of the national courts to provide legal remedies against governmental wrongdoing. Beneath the rules, principles, and technicalities in all of those areas lie the most fundamental political struggles that have driven American national development since the founding. Class participation will be a factor in determining final grades. Scheduled examination. E.A. Purcell, Jr.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20155
    Exam: 5/01/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21050-01
    • Federal Income Taxation
    • Listokin
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal Income Taxation (21050). 4 units. An introductory course on the federal income taxation of individuals and businesses. The course will provide an overview of the basic legal doctrine and will emphasize statutory interpretation and a variety of income tax policy issues. The class will consider the role of the courts, the Congress, and the IRS in making tax law and tax policy and will apply (and question) the traditional tax policy criteria of fairness, efficiency, macroeconomic stability, and administrability. Topics will include the definition of income, tax shelters, the interest deduction, and capital gains. No prerequisites. Scheduled examination: Y. Listokin.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Wed)
    SLB - 121 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20135
    Exam: 5/01/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21230-01
    • [The First Amendment
    • Balkin
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] First Amendment (21230). 4 units. This course will study the constitutional rights of freedom of expression and freedom of religion guaranteed by the First Amendment. Among the topics covered will be offensive speech; sedition; defamation; obscenity and pornography; commercial speech; symbolic speech; campaign finance; Internet and broadcast regulation; restrictions on time, place, and manner of expression; freedom of association; the Free Exercise Clause and the Religious Freedom Restoration Act; aid to parochial schools and other religious institutions; permissible accommodations of religious practice; and state establishments of religion. Self-scheduled examination or limited paper option. J. M. Balkin.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20054
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21162-01
    • Health Law
    • Barnes
    • Thu 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Health Law (21162). 4 units. This course will cover the full range of topics traditionally referred to as "health law," including the physician-patient relationship, informed consent, privacy and confidentiality, medical malpractice, regulation of health professions, regulation of health facilities, health care financing (including a survey of Medicare, Medicaid, Affordable Care Act, and private medical insurance law), regulation of drugs and devices, anti-kickback and abusive medical billing, and if time permits, end-of-life decision-making and reproductive health. Health law will be viewed as comprising the principles that govern and influence the interaction of patients and health care providers, and we will also consider the evolution of health law over time, as it reflects the development and history of medicine as a profession and the emergence of the modern hospital during the first decades of the twentieth century. Throughout the course we will compare the emergence of the medical professional in contrast to the emergence of the organized legal profession, to understand the “guild” a profession represents and how the law and culture of a “guild” relates to the larger legal system. Readings will include a traditional casebook, as well as materials documenting the modern history of medicine, public health, and health care finance. Self-scheduled examination. M. Barnes.

    Note: Students from other Yale Graduate and Professional Schools, especially the School of Public Health, may be admitted with permission of the instructor.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Thu)
    SLB - 121 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20056
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21351-01
    • Intellectual Property: The Law of Scientific and Cultural Production
    • Kapczynski
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Intellectual Property: The Law of Scientific and Cultural Production (21351). 4 units. This course will introduce students to the law governing scientific and cultural production. The course will focus on intellectual property law, but will also address other modalities that sustain such production, such as government funding and the commons. We will cover the conventional IP subjects in some detail (patent law, copyright law, and trademark), but in the context of a broader framework investigating the proper goals and tools of information policy. Students will gain a basic overview of the relevant black letter law, as well as an introduction to theoretical debates about the proper grounds of information policy, and debates about important policy issues in the contemporary realm of information policy, such as file sharing and global access to medicines. Self-scheduled examination. A. Kapczynski.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Wed)
    SLB - 127 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20117
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21209-01
    • International Business Transactions
    • Chua
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • faculty permission (79)
    • paper required
    Expand

    International Business Transactions (21209). 4 units. An introduction to the formation, regulation, and global impact of international business transactions. The primary focus of the course will be on the legal and practical aspects of cross-border transactions, including the structuring, negotiation, and documentation of the relevant arrangements. A secondary focus will be on the broader economic, political, and social context and consequences of international business transactions. Case studies from Latin America, Asia, the former Soviet Union, and the Middle East will be used. Topics to be discussed include privatization, project finance, letters of credit, conflicts of law, extraterritoriality, sovereign debt restructuring, expropriation, corruption, and the relationships among markets, democracy, and "culture." Enrollment will be limited to seventy. Permission of the instructor required. Paper required. A. Chua.

    Course Selection Information: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest and a CV by 4:30 pm on December 8. Priority will be given to first-year students for approximately half the places and the remaining seats will be allocated to students in their second and third years.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Tue)
    SLB - 129 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20198

    Close
    • 21454-01
    • Introduction to International and Transnational Law
    • Koh
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Introduction to International and Transnational Law (21454). 4 units. The course will cover both the public and the private dimensions of international and transnational law. Among the topics to be studied are such public international topics as the law of treaties, customary international law, international legal institutions, and the use of force; transnational legal process (including dispute settlement, transnational litigation and transnational arbitration) and selected issues of "transnational legal substance," including the Constitution and foreign affairs; international environmental law; international criminal law; and international business transactions. Scheduled examination. Also GLBL 594b. H.H. Koh.

    Note: No drop forms will be approved after the end of the open add/drop period.

    Note: Students who have taken Professor Hathaway's International Law are not eligible to enroll in Professor Koh's course.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20121
    Exam: 5/03/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.25 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30201-01
    • Legal Assistance: Reentry Clinic
    • Eppler-Epstein
      Shaffer
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 3:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential (8)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Legal Assistance: Reentry Clinic (30201). 4 units, credit/fail with a graded option. The New Haven Legal Assistance Reentry Clinic will provide civil legal representation to people with criminal convictions to help them challenge and navigate barriers to their successful reentry to society.

    Throughout the nation, people on all sides of the political spectrum have begun to re-examine the “tough on crime” policies of the past two decades that have led to the huge expansion of our prison population, at enormous economic, societal and personal cost. In Connecticut, Governor Malloy has championed the state as a “Second Chance Society” where people with criminal convictions receive an opportunity for a new beginning, to live positive, successful, law-abiding lives post incarceration. Yet the barriers to success continue for people who have criminal records, making it challenging for them to find employment and housing, access health and other services, and overcome the stigma attached to having criminal convictions on their record.

    Students in the Reentry Clinic will have an opportunity to represent individual clients on a variety of legal issues. Through this work, students will also identify and research challenges facing this population that invite litigation or legislative strategies for broader reforms. The clinic will accept cases referred from the Transitions Medical-Legal Partnership and existing Reentry support organizations, including Easter Seals Community Reentry Services (http://www.eastersealsgoodwill.org) , Project More (http://www.projectmore.org), Project Fresh Start (http://www.cityofnewhaven.com/mayor/prisonreentry.asp), Family Reentry (http://www.familyreentry.org), the New Haven Reentry Roundtable and other agencies working with this population.

    Examples of the direct representation cases students may work on include denials of housing subsidies based on an applicant’s criminal record, applications for pardons, employment discrimination based on the disparate impact of criminal convictions on minorities, access to health care and other public benefits and modification of child support obligations. Cases that the clinic will accept from Transitions include those in which ex-offender status both is and is not expressly at issue, because both kinds of cases reflect the immediate needs of this particular population. Students will represent clients in a variety of forums, including administrative hearings before Housing Authorities, the CHRO or EEOC, and the Department of Social Services; hearings before the Connecticut Board of Pardons and Parole; and state court.

    Students will gain experience in all aspects of lawyering, including interviewing clients and witnesses; written advocacy (examples include litigation pleadings, correspondence with clients, opposing counsel, and other third parties and letter memoranda); informal and formal fact investigation; and oral advocacy (examples include negotiations and questioning witnesses and presenting oral argument at administrative or court hearings). Students will also have an opportunity to engage in systemic reform by conducting legal and policy research to identify avenues for broader reforms. Students will be encouraged to engage in community meetings regarding reentry issues, including New Haven’s monthly Reentry Roundtable, and Fresh Start Advisory Group.

    During the first month of the semester, class will meet Wednesday and Friday for substantive trainings. During the latter part of the semester, class will meet Wednesday, and small group supervisions will be scheduled during the Friday time slot or other times to be arranged by participants. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to eight. A. Eppler-Epstein and E.R. Shaffer.

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students. The two meeting times reflect two credits for the seminar component and two credits for supervision and fieldwork. Classes and supervision will be held at the New Haven Legal Assistance offices, located at 426 State Street in New Haven, a 10-15 minute walk from the Law School.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Note: All students are expected to attend the first day of class.

    Location: NHLAO - CONF (Fri)
    NHLAO - CONF (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20240

    Close
    • 30204-01
    • Legal Assistance: Domestic Violence Clinic
    • Frontis
      Messali
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Legal Assistance: Domestic Violence Clinic (30204). 4 units. Students in the New Haven Legal Assistance Domestic Violence Clinic will represent survivors of domestic violence in Superior Court, in both civil and criminal matters, and also at the Connecticut legislature. The clinic will be based a New Haven Legal Assistance Association (LAA), a non-profit legal services office, whose mission is to secure justice for and protect the rights of those low-income residents of New Hven County who would otherwise be unable to secure legal representation. The clinic will be a legal resource for survivors of domestic violence and their families. Through their advocacy and coursework, students in the clinic will learn to practice as legal services lawyers, representing vulnerable individuals. Students can expect to work both on individual cases, as well as on policy matters affecting the clinic's client population. While it is likely that students will be representing clients in restraining order mattrs, and custody/visitation hearings, no substantive area of law will be excluded from consideration. When clients present with multiple legal problems, students may represent them in housing, consumer, benefits, Title IX, or immigration matters. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructors required. C. Frontis and E. Messali.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should also submit a statement of interest by December 8 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note:First-day attendance is required.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: NHLAO - CONF (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24057

    Close
    • 30222-01
    • Litigating Civil Actions: From Filing to Finality
    • Messing
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Litigating Civil Actions: From Filing to Finality (30222). 4 units. This course will provide students with an overview of the skills that litigators need to handle a civil action in federal court from start to finish. The course will review five phases of a lawsuit. First, we will explore how to prepare a filing: for example, we will discuss how to interview clients; how to investigate a case before filing; and how to prepare a complaint. The second phase will explore pre-trial activities such as answering a complaint; motions practice; communicating with opposing counsel; document discovery and other forms of discovery (such as physical inspections); how to take and defend depositions; and how to handle expert witnesses. The course’s third phase will discuss trial skills, including how to select jurors; prepare effective opening statements; examine, cross-examine, and reexamine witnesses; deliver successful closing statements; and prepare jury instructions. We will also have brief discussions about mediation and settlement. The fourth phase of the course will explore the most famous post-trial activity: the appeal. This discussion will delve into the substance of appeals as well as the less glamorous parts of appellate practice, such as filing a notice of appeal, motions practice on appeal, and preparing a joint appendix for the appellate court. We will also have a very brief discussion of cert. petitions and Supreme Court practice. Finally, the course’s fifth phase will discuss important post-trial activities that are rarely explored within law schools, including motions for costs and enforcement of judgments. The course aspires to give students confidence that they could handle a civil action on their own. Scheduled examination or paper option. N. Messing.

    Course Bidding: There is no enollment limit on this course.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Mon)
    SLB - 122 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20142
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21175-01
    • Local Government Law
    • Schleicher
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • limited enrollment (50)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Local Government Law (21175). 4 units. Much of our daily interaction with law and government is with local law and local government. Local governments are tasked with providing public goods as central to daily life as public schools and police; they pass laws and issue regulations governing everything from how loud parties can be to what one can eat; and, by setting property tax levels, regulating land uses and limiting building heights, they have an enormous impact on the value of what is for most families their largest asset, their home. Many law school classes, however, ignore local governments and local laws. This class will change that focus, examining both the law governing the powers of local governments and the actual content of local laws and policy. A special focus will be the regulation of politics at the local level, looking at how the rules governing local elections affect the results of those elections. Further, we will delve deeply into the determinants of the economic success of cities, using cutting edge research in agglomeration economics. And we will use those theoretical and empirical studies to address the nuts and bolts of local government law practice. Enrollment limited to fifty. Scheduled examination. D. N. Schleicher.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Wed)
    SLB - 128 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20162
    Exam: 5/01/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21017-01
    • Property
    • Zhang
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Property (21017). 4 units. This course will study the laws of property, its objectives and its institutions. It will investigate how property rights and institutions affect resources, prosperity, fairness, freedom, community, and the sometimes conflicting interests of individuals, groups, and government, in specific applications such as land, possessions, environmental resources, the family, and the self. It will cover issues such as acquisition, exclusion, trespass and nuisance, transfer, estates and future interests, covenants and easements, landlord-tenant and housing law, and compensation for government takings of property. Attention will be paid, in largely equal doses, to both the legal doctrine and its underlying socioeconomic, political, and moral rationales. Self-scheduled examination. T. Zhang.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Wed)
    SLB - 122 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20190
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Name or Id: Id

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    • 21411-01
    • Reading the Constitution: Method and Substance
    • Amar
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
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    Reading the Constitution: Method and Substance (21411). 4 units. An advanced constitutional law course focusing intently on the Constitution itself (as distinct from the case law interpreting it, sometimes quite loosely). The course will begin by studying the document itself in exquisite detail, Article by Article, and Amendment by Amendment. The main text for this segment of the course will be Amar, America's Constitution: A Biography (2005). The course will then canvass various methods of constitutional interpretation (associated, for example, with writings by Ackerman, Amar, Balkin, Black, Bobbitt, Ely, Tribe, Rubenfeld, Siegel, and Strauss). Self-scheduled examination or paper option. A.R. Amar.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20052
    Exam: 5/01/2017 - 5/15/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

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    • 30190-01
    • Rule of Law Clinic
    • Koh
      Metcalf
      Wishnie
      Spector
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Fri 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
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    Rule of Law Clinic (30190). 4 units. This clinic will focus on maintaining the rule of law and human rights in three areas: national security law (torture, drones, Guantanamo); antidiscrimination (against religious and ethnic groups); and climate change (maintaining U.S. commitments under the Paris Agreement, which has just entered into force). We will divide the work into these three work streams, and pick discrete projects (some litigation, some advocacy, some other kinds of work) where we think our work product can contribute meaningfully to preservation of the rule of law. Open only to U.S. J.D. students. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Permission of the instructors required. H.H. Koh, M.J. Wishnie, H.R. Metcalf, and P.M. Spector.

    Course Bidding: In addition to ranking this clinic among experiential course selections, students should submit a statement of interest and a resume by December 8 at 4:30 p.m. Students do not have to bid the clinic first so long as they indicate in the statement of interest that they would accept a place in the clinic, if offered. Nor do students have to have prerequisite experience in the three project areas, although such experience is preferred.

    Note: The regular class meetings will be on Tuesday. The Friday meeting times are for make-up classes. The class will not meet every Friday but only on those dates announced by the instructors.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    SLB - 124 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24025

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    • 21577-01
    • Work and Gender
    • Schultz
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 5
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
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    Work and Gender (21577). 5 units. This course will examine how workplaces, firms, jobs, and even the people who occupy them come to be structured along gendered lines. The class will read theoretical accounts, social science studies, ethnographies, and legal cases to obtain an understanding of the mechanisms through which work becomes gendered. Among the questions the course will address are: Do workplaces merely reflect or rather actively reproduce gendered social relations and identities? What is the relationship among employment, citizenship, and sex/gender? How do structural features of organizations tend to reproduce sex segregation and sex-based harassment? How do work organizations interact with household arrangements to reproduce gender inequality? How should we understand the relationship between sex, gender, and sexuality at work? What theories ground past and present interpretations of the law's ban on sex discrimination in the workplace? Which theories should do so? The representation of gender and work in the popular media will also be explored, through an accompanying, required in-class film series. Scheduled examination. V. Schultz.

    Please note: The regular class meetings will be on Monday and Tuesday, 4:10-6 p.m., but films related to the class will be shown between 6 and 9 p.m. on either Monday or Tuesday, most weeks. Students interested in this course should plan their class schedules accordingly so that they are available between 4 and 9 p.m. on most Mondays and Tuesdays, since we strive to see the films together, and discuss them afterward, as a class.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20164
    Exam: 5/02/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

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