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Courses: Spring 2016 Expand

    • 30129-01
    • Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Seminar
    • Parkin
      Hallett
    • Tue 1:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Seminar (30129). 1 unit, graded or credit/fail at student option. A weekly seminar session only for returning students. Prerequisite: Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. N. Hallett and J. Parkin.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20174

    Close
    • 30125-01
    • Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Seminar
    • Parkin
      Li
    • Mon 1:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Seminar (30125). 1 unit, graded or credit/fail at student option. A weekly seminar session only for returning students. Prerequisite: Veterans Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. J. Parkin, B. Li, and M. VandenBroek.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.
    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20176

    Close
    • 21492-01
    • Empirical Legal Research
    • Ryan
      Matheson
    • Wed 3:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 1
    • Partial Satisfaction of Skills Requirement
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Empirical Legal Research (21492). 1 unit, credit/fail. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the field of empirical legal research and to provide the student with practice in basic study design. Topics covered include basic research terminology, hypothesis and research question construction, methodology selection, and basic statistical analysis. The course will emphasize an applied approach to research grounded in real-world issues. Although the focus of this course will be on empirical legal research, students will engage with empirical data throughout the course. The skills requirement (†) may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1-unit legal research course. This course will meet for the first half of the term. S. Matheson and S. Ryan.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20142

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    • 21193-01
    • Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events
    • Silk
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events (21193). 1 unit, credit/fail. Conducted in workshop format and led by Professor James Silk, Director of the Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights, the course will examine contemporary issues in human rights practice and theory. Guest speakers, including scholars, advocates and journalists, will present each week on a diverse range of topics in human rights. Readings are generally distributed in advance of each session. Students enrolled in the workshop for one unit of ungraded credit will prepare short response papers before several of the sessions and be responsible for asking the speaker a question at each of those sessions. The workshop will meet approximately every other week. J.J. Silk.

    Location: SLB - FAC-LOUNGE (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20100

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    • 21041-01
    • Law, Economics, and Organization
    • Jolls
    • Thu 4:10 PM-5:40 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Law, Economics, and Organization (21041). 1 unit, credit/fail. This seminar will meet jointly with the Law, Economics, and Organization Workshop, an interdisciplinary faculty workshop that brings to Yale Law School scholars, generally from other universities, who present papers based on their current research. The topics will involve a broad range of issues of general legal and social science interest. Students registering for the seminar and participating in the workshop will receive one unit of ungraded credit per term. Neither Substantial Paper nor Supervised Analytic Writing credit will be available through the seminar. Short reaction papers will be required during the term. C. Jolls.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20071

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    • 30178-01
    • Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project
    • Bernstein
      Bialek
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
      Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (30178). 1 unit, with the option of additional units. This course will introduce students to local government lawyering. Working directly with attorneys from the Affirmative Litigation Task Force in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, students will have an opportunity to brainstorm about potential projects, research the most promising ideas for lawsuits, assist in filing a case, or help litigate one already underway. The course will address both theoretical issues (What roles should cities play in our democracy? Can cities further the public interest through litigation?) and practical ones (city-state relations, standing issues). The first part of the course will acquaint students with broader legal and policy issues associated with affirmative litigation. The students will then break into independent working groups organized by subject area; the working groups will be designed to accommodate student interests and preferences. Each working group will either develop and propose a potential lawsuit, or assist in one of the City’s ongoing affirmative litigation cases. Students joining in the fall are expected to make a one-year commitment (both fall and spring semesters). In addition, students enrolling in this course for the first time in Fall 2015 must complete their one-year commitment in the course to receive professional responsibility credit. Permission of the instructor required. Instructor to be announced. E. Bernstein and T. Bialek.

    Course Selection: List this clinic among the experiential course selections. If you would like to enroll, please submit one paragraph on why you are interested in local government work as well as your resume by December 10, 2015, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Tue)
    ASH40 - A005 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20152

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    • 50100-01
    • RdgGrp: African Am Lit &theLaw
    • Forman
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25077

    Close
    • 50100-02
    • RdgGrp: Animal Protection Law
    • Kysar
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25078

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    • 50100-03
    • RdgGrp: Beer Law
    • Chua
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25079

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    • 50100-09
    • RdgGrp: Law & FieldExperiments
    • Ayres
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25085

    Close
    • 50100-11
    • RdgGrp: Patent Law
    • Kapczynski
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25087

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    • 50100-12
    • RdgGrp: Presidential Elections
    • Schleicher
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25088

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    • 50100-13
    • RdgGrp: Reason and the Sacred
    • Kahn
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25089

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    • 50100-14
    • RdgGrp: Refugee Families
    • Metcalf
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25090

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    • 50100-16
    • RdgGrp: Technology Law &Policy
    • Balkin
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25092

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    • 50100-17
    • RdgGrp:(Re-)readingRobertCover
    • Kahn
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25162

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    • 50100-18
    • RdgGrp:Big Data & Global Media
    • Balkin
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25163

    Close
    • 50100-07
    • RdgGrp:BusnssInAfricaLawPolicy
    • Chua
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25083

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    • 50100-05
    • RdgGrp:Challenging Admin State
    • Priest
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25081

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    • 50100-04
    • RdgGrp:ChallengingLaw&Economic
    • Markovits
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25080

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    • 50100-06
    • RdgGrp:Consumer Law
    • Eskridge
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25082

    Close
    • 50100-19
    • RdgGrp:GenderEquality&LeglProf
    • Siegel
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25164

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    • 50100-08
    • RdgGrp:History&TheoryInt'l Law
    • Kahn
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25084

    Close
    • 50100-10
    • RdgGrp:Law&Policy of Urban Dev
    • Ellickson
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25086

    Close
    • 50100-15
    • RdgGrp:SyriaIntlLawGlobalOrder
    • Hathaway
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25091

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    • 21486-01
    • Research Methods in American Law
    • Kauffman
      Eiseman
      Jefferson
      Krishnaswami
      Kellett
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 1
    • Partial Satisfaction of Skills Requirement
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Research Methods in American Law (21486). 1 unit, credit/fail. This course, formerly Efficient Techniques in Legal Research, will instruct students in basic legal research skills, including researching federal case law, statutory and administrative law, as well as using secondary sources in the research process. Students will be required to complete a series of short research assignments. The course will meet once weekly for the first half of the term. The skills requirement (†) may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1 unit legal research course. Minimum enrollment of five required. S.B. Kauffman, J. G. Krishnaswami, J. Eiseman, J. Jefferson, and C. Kellett.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20121

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    • 21731-01
    • The Roberts Court and the Freedom of Speech
    • Abrams
      Liptak
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    [The] Roberts Court and the Freedom of Speech (21731). 1 unit. This course will explore two related questions. After ten terms, what is distinctive about the Roberts Court's free speech jurisprudence? Is the protection of free expression, long thought to be a liberal cause, now a conservative one? The course will consider a series of decisions in which the Court protected unpopular, deeply distasteful and painful speech uttered by marginal and often politically powerless speakers. It will then explore the charge that the Court has engaged in a sort of twenty-first century "Lochnerism" in subjecting well-established economic regulations to far too skeptical review in the name of the First Amendment. That opens the door to a more general consideration of the scope and application of First Amendment strict scrutiny in the Roberts Court. The course will conclude with looks at one area that has deeply engaged the Court (campaign finance) and one that has not (the freedom of the press). Paper required. F. Abrams and A. Liptak.

    Note: This course will meet for seven two-hour sessions on February 18 and 25; March 3, 10, 24, and 31; and April 7.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23324

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    • 21489-01
    • Specialized Legal Research in Corporate Law
    • Kauffman
      Chisholm
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 1
    • Partial Satisfaction of Skills Requirement
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Specialized Legal Research in Corporate Law (21489). 1 unit, credit/fail. This course will include both lecture and discussion on methods and sources in corporate law, including securities law and criminal prosecutions of corporate fraud. Secondary sources will be emphasized, but basic finding-skills will also be addressed: case-finding; statutes-finding; locating legislative histories; and locating administrative materials. Online, print, and other resources will be considered throughout. Three guest speakers are scheduled: one who will present non-law business databases, another who will provide an introduction to reading a financial report, and a third guest (an Assistant U.S. Attorney and YLS alumnus) who will address the use of secondary sources in legal research generally, and with special attention to securities law and corporate fraud. This course will meet weekly for seven weeks in the first half of the erm. The skills requirement (†) may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1-unit legal research course. S.B. Kauffman and M. Chisholm.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20196

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    • 21487-01
    • Specialized Legal Research in Foreign and International Law
    • Kauffman
      Harrington
      Miguel-Stearns
      Ma
    • Fri 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1
    • Partial Satisfaction of Skills Requirement
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Specialized Legal Research in Foreign and International Law (21487). 1 unit, credit/fail. Explores methods for finding the major sources of international law, including treaties and customary law; the material from the UN and other inter-governmental organizations; and laws from nations other than the United States. Particular attention is paid to practical research issues and solutions using both print and electronic resources. Research interests of the class and other specialized topics may also be explored. Minimum enrollment of five required. The skills requirement (†) may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1-unit legal research course. This course will meet weekly for seven weeks in the first half of the term. S.B. Kauffman, R. Harrington, E. Ma, and T. Miguel-Stearns.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20122

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    • 30141-01
    • †Temporary Restraining Order Project
    • Wizner
      Frontis
      Blank
      Wenzloff
    • 1
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential (15)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Temporary Restraining Order Project (30141). 1 unit, credit/fail. The Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) Project is a field placement program in which law students provide assistance to domestic violence victims applying for Temporary Restraining Orders in the Superior Court for the New Haven Judicial District, under the supervision of attorneys from the New Haven Legal Assistance Association and the Court Clerk’s Office. The TRO Project aims to increase access to justice for self-represented parties and provide opportunities for law students to learn about the law of domestic violence and court procedures for protecting individuals in abusive relationships. Students will be able to develop practical skills, including intake, interviewing, drafting of affidavits and other application documents, informing applicants about court procedures, and assisting applicants in navigating the judicial process. Open only to J.D. students. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. S. Wizner, C. Frontis, A. Wenzloff, and D. Blank.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20178

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    • 21157-01
    • Advanced Arts and International Human Rights: Theory and Practice
    • Silk
    • 1 or 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Arts and International Human Rights: Theory and Practice (21157). 1 or 2 units, graded, with a credit/fail option. Students will continue to participate in collaborative projects with visiting artists, working closely with them in the design, research, and realization of new works related to human rights themes. Open only to student who have completed Art and International Human Rights: Theory and Practice. Permission of the instructor required. J.J. Silk.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this seminar as their lowest priority among permission-of-the-instructor selections. This course is not open to new students.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 23672

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    • 30185-01
    • Advanced Nonprofit Organizations Clinic
    • Lindsay
      Davis
      Agsten
    • 1 or 2
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Nonprofit Organizations Clinic (30185). 1 or 2 units, credit/fail. Open only to students who have completed the Nonprofit Organizations Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. B. Lindsay, L. Davis, M. Agsten.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 25240

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    • 21708-01
    • Advanced International Law and Foreign Relations Lawyering
    • Hathaway
    • 1 or 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced International Law and Foreign Relations Lawyering (21708). 1 or 2 units. Enrollment limited to those previously enrolled in International Law and Foreign Relations: Seminar. Permission of the instructor required. O. Hathaway.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20070

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    • 30102-01
    • Advanced Advocacy for Children and Youth
    • Peters
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Advocacy for Children and Youth (30102). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. Open only to students who have completed Advocacy for Children and Youth. Permission of the instructor required. J.K. Peters.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20164

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    • 30163-01
    • Advanced Education Adequacy Project
    • Rosen
      Knopp
      Moodhe
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Education Adequacy Project (30163). 1 to 3 units. Open only to students who have completed Education Adequacy Project. Permission of the instructors required. D. Rosen, A. Knopp, J.P. Moodhe, and A. Taubes.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20369

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    • 30120-01
    • Advanced Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic
    • Pottenger
    • Wed 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic (30120). 1 to 3 units. Open only to students who have completed the Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. J.L. Pottenger, Jr.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23724

    Close
    • 30132-01
    • Advanced Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork
    • Brown
      Muckenfuss
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork (30132). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail or graded at student option. Open only to students who have completed the Community and Economic Development Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. J.H. Brown and C.F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest preference among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 23288

    Close
    • 30104-01
    • Advanced Community and Economic Development Clinic: Seminar
    • Brown
      Muckenfuss
    • Thu 9:10 AM-10:00 AM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Community and Economic Development Clinic: Seminar (30104) and Fieldwork (30132). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail with a graded option. Open only to students who have completed the Community and Economic Development Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. J.H. Brown and C. F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest preference among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; or Temporary Restraining Order Project.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20160

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    • 30167-01
    • †Advanced Ethics Bureau at Yale
    • Fox
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential (8)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Ethics Bureau (30167). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail with a graded option. This course is for students who have already taken either the Ethics Bureau at Yale clinic or the instructor’s course, Traversing the Legal Minefield, and who wish to earn 1 to 3 units by contributing further to the work of the Bureau. †Students may satisfy the professional skills requirement through this course only if they receive 2 or more units. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructor required. L. Fox.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20151

    Close
    • 30179-01
    • Advanced San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project
    • Bernstein
      Bialek
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
      Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced SFALP (30179). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. Open only to those students who have completed Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project. Permission of the instructor required. E. Bernstein and T. Bialek.

    Course Selection: Continuing students should list this section as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Tue)
    ASH40 - A005 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20153

    Close
    • 30165-01
    • Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic
    • Galperin
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential (20)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic (30165). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail. Open only to students who have successfully completed the Environmental Protection Clinic. Students who complete this section for two or more units may satisfy the Professional Responsibility (*) or Legal Skills (†) requirement. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to twenty. J. Galperin.

    Course Information: Eligible students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20188

    Close
    • 30114-01
    • Advanced Immigration Legal Services Clinic: Seminar
    • Peters
      Zonana
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Immigration Legal Services (30114). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. Open only to students who have completed Immigration Legal Services. Permission of instructor required. J.K. Peters.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.

    Note: Due to our immediate commitments to our clients, Professor Peters will finalize the roster by email before the first class, after which the clinic cannot be dropped.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20166

    Close
    • 30116-01
    • Advanced Landlord/Tenant Legal Services
    • Pottenger
      Dineen
    • Wed 3:15 PM-4:45 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Landlord/Tenant Legal Services (30116). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail. Only open to students who have taken Landlord/Tenant Legal Services in a previous semester. Permission of the instructors required. F.X. Dineen and J.L. Pottenger, Jr.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20495

    Close
    • 30117-01
    • Advanced Legal Services for Immigrant Communities
    • Wizner
      Lucht
    • Thu 1:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential (4)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Services for Immigrant Communities (30117). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail. Open only to students who have taken Legal Services for Immigrant Communities. Open only to J.D. students. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to four. C.L. Lucht and S. Wizner.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20179

    Close
    • 21181-01
    • War, the Market, and Justice
    • Deutsch
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • Professional Skills
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    War, the Market, and Justice (21181). 1 to 3 units. This course will outline a jurisprudence based on the treatment of law as a social science, a perspective that makes the jurisprudence explanatory of United States law a philosophical perspective on social reality. J.G. Deutsch.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20055

    Close
    • 30111-01
    • *†Advanced Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic
    • Forman
      Shaffer
      Gohara
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic (30111). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option. Open only to students who have completed the Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. J. Forman, M. Gohara, and E. Shaffer.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should use their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20149

    Close
    • 21069-01
    • Innovation and Reform in the Delivery of Legal Services
    • Hartman
    • Mon 2:40 PM-5:40 PM
    • 1.5
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Innovation and Reform in the Delivery of Legal Services (21069). 1.5 units. The market for legal services, estimated to be greater than $400b in the US alone, has historically been dominated by a single means of delivery: Licensed lawyers working either on their own or through a firm wholly-owned by lawyers. Often such firms underinvest in technology and process, to the extent that they invest at all.

    This model has failed to fully serve its intended audience. According to the American Bar Association, 92% of middle-income Americans with a serious legal problem do not seek the help of a lawyer. This prompted ABA president William Hubbard to remark that the legal profession “must develop a new model to meet the needs of the underserved.”

    Bars and state regulators have responded in a number of ways, including proposed reforms by state bar officials. In the United Kingdom and Australia, laws have been changed to permit non-lawyer ownership of a law firm. The private sector has taken increasingly vigorous action, growing into a burgeoning field of businesses attacking the problem using different business models and executions. For example, in 2009, only 15 legal startups were listed on the popular private-funding website AngelList; today there are over 900 with more than 1,200 different investors.

    Fundamentally, a deregulating market has challenges and opportunities. Students of this course will be graduating just as a multi-hundred-billion-dollar industry undergoes a sea change, with enormous consequences both here and abroad. Through this course, we hope to inform students of the potential to both create new businesses and to bring about meaningful social change.

    This course will explore: The sources of friction in the marketplace for legal services; the impact of non-consumption on business and society; private sector approaches to the problem, with a special emphasis on entrepreneurial disruptors; deregulation, and its potential to create new markets and be a force for social good. Furthermore, the course will facilitate student mock-legal-tech venture creation with the participation of noted experts and authors in the field. Ten Law students may be accepted in the course. Also MGT 651b. E. Hartman.

    Note: This course will meet during the Spring-2 session at the School of Management and will follow the School of Management calendar.

    Location: EVANS - 4420 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24037

    Close
    • 30183-01
    • Advanced Criminal Justice Reform Workshop
    • Meares
      Quattlebaum
    • Tue 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Criminal Justice Reform Workshop (30183). 2 units. Open only to students who participated in the Fall 2015 course. Permission of the instructors required. T. Meares and M. Quattlebaum.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this workshop as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23947

    Close
    • 30181-01
    • †Advanced Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic
    • Greenhouse
      Balkin
      Pincus
      Rothfeld
      Kimberly
      Hughes
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Supreme Court Advocacy (30181). 4 units (2 fall, 2 spring). Open only to students who have completed Supreme Court Advocacy. Permission of the instructors required. L. Greenhouse, A. Pincus, C. Rothfeld, P.W. Hughes, M.B. Kimberly, and J.M. Balkin.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest choice among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20155

    Close
    • 30223-01
    • † Advanced Issues in Capital Markets:Role of Counsel forIssuers&Underwriters inInitialPublicOffering
    • Brod
      Fleisher
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential (20)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Issues in Capital Markets: Role of Counsel for Issuers and Underwriters in an Initial Public Offering (30223). 2 units. This advanced securities law seminar will provide insights into the lawyer’s participation in the capital markets practice. The organizing principle will be the role of counsel for issuers and underwriters in the execution of an initial public offering (“IPO”) registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) pursuant to the Securities Act of 1933, which will drive consideration of a wide range of legal and practical issues (including related issues under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934).

    The sessions will be oriented around the key steps required at each stage of the IPO process. Students will read primarily transaction documents (e.g., registration statements; underwriting agreements; etc.) drawn from actual IPOs, supplemented by PowerPoint presentations and memoranda prepared by the instructors, as well as SEC materials, accounting literature, and treatise excerpts. Reading materials will be tailored in scope, with a focus on facilitating each session’s discussion and course assignments. Additional materials also will be provided for further, optional reading where desired and to provide useful reference tools for future practice. Students will engage in drafting exercises, in-class analysis and mock negotiations (including negotiation of an underwriting agreement). The course will also focus on certain key transaction management skills, including in respect of “situational judgment.” Guest speakers from the investment banking and corporate communities will be invited for special sessions to present their perspectives on the IPO process and legal/business capital markets issues more generally. Grading will be based on performance on experiential assignments and class participation. The first session of the course will include an overview of the U.S. federal securities law regulatory framework. This will serve as an important refresher for those who already have studied securities regulation (which is encouraged) and as a basic foundation for those who may not yet have extensive knowledge of the topic. Enrollment limited to twenty. Permission of the instructors required. C. B. Brod and A.E. Fleisher.

    Note: Students will be able to drop the course in accordance with standard YLS policies.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20372

    Close
    • 30200-01
    • †Advanced Appellate Litigation Project
    • Duke
      Daniels
      Dooley
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Appellate Litigation Project (30200). 4 units (2 fall, 2 spring). Open only to students who have completed the fall-term section of the Advanced Appellate Litigation Project. Permission of instructors required. S.B. Duke, B. Daniels, and T. Dooley.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as their lowest preference among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 22231

    Close
    • 30212-01
    • † Advocacy in International Arbitration
    • Buckley
      Mahoney
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential (10)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advocacy in International Arbitration (30212). 2 units. International arbitration is a growing field and increasingly is the mechanism by which the largest international commercial disputes are resolved. This course has two primary aims: (1) to expose students to this area of legal practice; and (2) to provide them with the skills they need to represent clients effectively in international commercial arbitrations. The course is built around a series of exercises that track major stages in the arbitral process, culminating in an evidentiary hearing during which students will present argument and examine witnesses. At each stage of the process, instructors will provide feedback and insights based on their experience dealing with the very same factual scenarios the students will encounter during the mock exercises. In addition to the in-class exercises, there will be a series of short lectures and discussions about key strategic and procedural issues in international commercial arbitration. There will be no paper or final exam, but students will be required to complete a series of written exercises and participate in oral arguments. Enrollment limited to ten. J. J. Buckley, Jr., and C.J. Mahoney.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20367

    Close
    • 21737-01
    • Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, and the Law
    • Balkin
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission (15)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Artificial Intelligence, Robotics, and the Law (21737). 2 units. This research seminar will study the emerging legal and social issues of robotics and artificial agents. Topics will include robot-human interactions, cyborg technologies, civilian and military drones, self-driving automobiles, and computer-generated speech and production. Students will be required to develop and present their own works-in-progress. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Permission of the instructor required. J.M. Balkin .

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should also submit a statement of interest by the close of the spring early registration period on December 10.

    Location: ASH40 - A420 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20049

    Close
    • 21761-01
    • Bureaucracy
    • Parrillo
    • Fri 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission (8)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Bureaucracy (21761). 2 units. One of the primary tasks of modern American lawyers is to influence the exercise of bureaucratic power. Further, lawyers in America are often called upon to serve in, or to help design, bureaucratic agencies. The agenda for this seminar is to discuss leading works on government administration -- some classic and some cutting-edge -- from political science, sociology, law, and other disciplines. The kinds of questions we will ask include: Why do some bureaucracies inspire respect and admiration, while others inspire disdain, hatred, and resistance? Why are bureaucrats highly responsive to some stakeholders and callously indifferent to others? What kinds of people self-select into government jobs -- and what kinds of opportunities, dangers, and biases result from that self-selection? What are the most effective strategies for getting the attention of a bureaucracy -- and getting it to change its ways? Should bureaucrats be understood as the servants and agents of politicians, or as politicians in their own right? Does bureaucratic organization embody the rule of law, or threaten it? Do lawsuits against a bureaucracy have any effect on its behavior -- and if so, do they make things better or worse? Students are required to participate actively in each week’s discussion. Grades will be based solely on class participation. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructor required. N. Parrillo.

    Course Bidding Information: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a brief statement of why they wish to take the course (no more than 500 words) by 4:30 p.m. on December 10. The statement may discuss how bureaucracy relates to your academic interests, background, career plans, or anything else you consider relevant to your interest in the subject. In selecting students, the instructor will seek a diversity and balance of perspectives.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20083

    Close
    • 21761-02
    • Bureaucracy
    • Parrillo
    • Fri 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Bureaucracy (21761). 2 units. One of the primary tasks of modern American lawyers is to influence the exercise of bureaucratic power. Further, lawyers in America are often called upon to serve in, or to help design, bureaucratic agencies. The agenda for this seminar is to discuss leading works on government administration -- some classic and some cutting-edge -- from political science, sociology, law, and other disciplines. The kinds of questions we will ask include: Why do some bureaucracies inspire respect and admiration, while others inspire disdain, hatred, and resistance? Why are bureaucrats highly responsive to some stakeholders and callously indifferent to others? What kinds of people self-select into government jobs -- and what kinds of opportunities, dangers, and biases result from that self-selection? What are the most effective strategies for getting the attention of a bureaucracy -- and getting it to change its ways? Should bureaucrats be understood as the servants and agents of politicians, or as politicians in their own right? Does bureaucratic organization embody the rule of law, or threaten it? Do lawsuits against a bureaucracy have any effect on its behavior -- and if so, do they make things better or worse? Students are required to participate actively in each week’s discussion. Grades will be based solely on class participation. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructor required. N. Parrillo.

    Course Bidding Information: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a brief statement of why they wish to take the course (no more than 500 words) by 4:30 p.m. on December 10. The statement may discuss how bureaucracy relates to your academic interests, background, career plans, or anything else you consider relevant to your interest in the subject. In selecting students, the instructor will seek a diversity and balance of perspectives.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24343

    Close
    • 21597-01
    • Capitalism Film Society
    • Priest
    • Tue 4:10 PM-7:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Capitalism Film Society (21597). 2 units, credit/fail. Each week this class will review a film that deals with capitalism. Discussion will be held following the film. Each student will be required to submit a one-to-two page response paper discussing each film. G.L. Priest.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20118

    Close
    • 21407-01
    • Children, Psychology and the Law: Seminar
    • Stein
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment (16)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Children, Psychology and the Law: Seminar (21407). 2 units. This course will explore the interface between contemporary scientific research concerning human cognitive/psychological development and legal issues concerning children and adolescents. This course will include legal and ethical topics from family law, constitutional law, criminal law, and bioethics including: children and adolescents as witnesses; the "recovered memory" debate; child custody; race and ethnicity issues in the adoption context; various legal topics related to sexuality, sexual orientation and gender identity; effects of exposure to pornographic and violent images on children; and the extent to which children and adolescents should be held responsible for their acts. Included in the readings will be material from psychology and related scientific fields that bear on these legal and ethical questions. At the broadest level, from both a legal and a psychological perspective, we will ask: What is a child? What is an adolescent? How do children and adolescents differ from each other and from adults? And how do these groups differ in terms of their rights, relationship to the state, and relationship to their parents? Paper required. Enrollment limited to sixteen. Also PSYC 614b. E.D. Stein and P. Bloom.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20103

    Close
    • 30198-01
    • †Complex Civil Litigation
    • Underhill
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • paper required
    Expand

    †Complex Civil Litigation (30198). 2 units. This course will focus principally on the issues that can impact the outcome of complex civil cases. Emphasis will be placed on effective practical legal writing, as well as on successful argument techniques and litigation strategies. To a large extent, students will learn by doing; each student will write two briefs and argue those two issues in class. Those briefs will be posted on YLS:Inside and will constitute a part of the weekly reading assignment for the course. Supplemental readings consisting of Supreme Court and Second Circuit decisions will also be assigned weekly.

    The class will be organized into four “law firms” of five students each. Ten of the class sessions will be designated as argument days. Each law firm must assign one student to write a memorandum of law in support of the position (motion or opposition) assigned to the firm and then to argue that position in class. Each student must handle two such assignments over the course of the semester. The briefs and arguments will be based on problems written for this class; there is no casebook for the course.

    The arguments and related discussions will address issues that impact complex civil cases, including: assembling the right parties (joinder, necessary parties), establishing personal jurisdiction through indirect contacts (internet, agency), forum selection (transfer, forum non conveniens), heightened pleading standards (Twombly, PSLRA), discovery in complex cases (electronic discovery, privilege), stays or abstention in favor of related litigation (Colorado River, Rooker-Feldman), multi-district litigation, class action procedures and limitations (class arbitration, CAFA, SLUSA), interlocutory appeals, sanctions, judicial disqualification, and attorneys’ fees.

    Grading will be based principally on the two papers (briefs) submitted by each student. Oral arguments and class discussion will also count. There will be no examination. Substantial Paper credit available. Enrollment capped at twenty. Permission of the instructor required. S.R. Underhill.

    Note: Because this course requires a specific number of students, those who have been accepted will be notified and asked to confirm their intention to remain in the course before classes start, so that students on the waiting list may be offered places before the first class meeting.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20373

    Close
    • 30220-01
    • †Compliance: Legal Practicum
    • Garrity-Rokous
    • Fri 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential (16)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Compliance: Legal Practicum (30220). 2 units. Regulators, shareholders, and customers increasingly expect organizations to identify, assess and comply with legal requirements, demonstrate adequate risk management and governance, and establish, test, and report controls. At the same time, legal mandates require organizations to protect whistleblowers, while enforcement guidelines induce organizations to self-report violations. In short, the compliance function constitutes an increasingly dynamic and challenging field for lawyers, one demanding the ability to understand the separate perspectives of regulators, business leaders, consumers, and employees.

    This course will explore the legal, ethical, and policy foundations of compliance: the effort to translate statutory mandates into compliant organizational and individual behavior. Through the practical application of simulations and case studies, this course will seek to meet three objectives: (1) enable students to identify and proactively address potential compliance issues; (2) develop the practical problem-solving skills needed to respond to compliance failures; and (3) provide students with the theoretical and practical tools necessary to advocate on behalf of a company under investigation for a regulatory violation. Enrollment limited to twelve to sixteen. Permission of the instructor required. G. Garrity-Rokous.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20141

    Close
    • 21358-01
    • Conflict of Laws
    • Brilmayer
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Conflict of Laws (21358). 2 units. Choice of law and judgments enforcement in the American federal system. This course has some overlap with civil procedure -- students will mostly already have at least a basic familiarity with the law of judgments, personal jurisdiction, and the Erie Railroad doctrine. But the heart of the course is common law, statutory law, and constitutional law relating to extraterritorial application of state and federal substantive rules, primarily in the interstate (rather than international) context. The assigned course book will be Brilmayer, Goldsmith, and O'Hara-O'Connor, Conflict of Laws: Cases and Materials (Aspen Publishing, 7th edition, 2015).Students may arrange to write a paper instead of the examination, including papers for Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. L. Brilmayer.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20051
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21345-01
    • †Constitutional Litigation Seminar
    • Calabresi
      Walker
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • limited enrollment (12)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Constitutional Litigation Seminar (21345). 2 units. Federal constitutional adjudication from the vantage of the litigator with an emphasis on Circuit and Supreme Court practice and procedural problems, including jurisdiction, justiciability, exhaustion of remedies, immunities, abstention, and comity. Specific substantive questions of constitutional law currently before the Supreme Court are considered as well. Students will each argue two cases taken from the Supreme Court docket and will write one brief, which may be from that docket, but will likely come from the Second Circuit. Students will also join the faculty members on the bench and will, from time to time, be asked to make brief arguments on very short notice on issues raised in the class. Brief required. Enrollment limited to twelve. G. Calabresi and J.M. Walker, Jr.

    Note: This seminar will meet fourteen times, on January 21, February 10, 11, 17, 18, 24, 25; March 30, 31; April 6, 7, 13, 14, and 20. The first class meeting will be held on Thursday, January 21 in room SLB 109 at the Law School; thereafter the class meetings will be at 157 Church Street at the same time. Because of the nature of this seminar, admitted students who wish to drop the course must notify the instructors and remove the course from their schedule no later than Thursday, January 21, following the first class meeting; all students who are on the admitted list by the end of that day must take the course and will not be permitted subsequently to drop. First day attendance strongly urged. Those students on the waiting list must attend the first class meeting on January 21 to learn if any places have opened. Beginning on Friday, January 22, if places have opened, students on the waiting list who attended the first class meeting will be offered places, in the order in which those students appear on the waiting list. Other waitlisted students may be considered after offers are made to those who attended the first class, should additional openings occur.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20052

    Close
    • 21523-01
    • Doing Constitutional Law: Some Contemporary Theories
    • Amar
      Bobbitt
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
      Thu 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Doing Constitutional Law: Some Contemporary Theories (21523). 2 units. This class will explore some of the contending theories about constitutional interpretation and discuss the distinctive elements, contributions and challenges each presents. Students will read books that are generally regarded as significant in the field, as well as a number of articles. The question to be answered in this course is whether any of these theories deserves to be given preeminence or indeed whether any particular ranking of theories in a pluralistic scheme makes sense. Paper required. A.R. Amar and P. Bobbitt.

    Note: This course will meet twice weekly beginning on March 2.

    Location: ASH40 - A422 (Wed)
    ASH40 - A422 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24801

    Close
    • 30105-01
    • *†Criminal Justice Clinic: Seminar
    • Doherty
      Ullmann
      Bruce
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Criminal Justice Clinic (30105) and Fieldwork (30106). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option, for each part (4 units total). The clinic and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. Students will represent defendants in criminal cases in the Geographical Area #23 courthouse (the "GA") on Elm Street in New Haven. Students will handle all aspects of their clients' cases under the direct supervision of clinical faculty. Students will learn how to build relationships with clients, investigate and develop their cases, construct persuasive case theories, negotiate with opposing counsel, prepare motions and briefs, and advocate for clients in court. Students will also explore the legal framework governing the representation of clients in criminal cases, including the rules of professional responsibility. Throughout, students will be encouraged to think critically about the operation of the criminal justice system and to reflect on opportunities for reform. Because of the frequency of court appearances, students must keep two mornings a week (Monday--Friday, 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.) free from other obligations. Students must also return to the law school a few days before the start of the semester to participate in an orientation program intended to prepare them for criminal practice. Enrollment limited. F. Doherty, S.O. Bruce III, and T. Ullmann.

    Note: New students who are accepted in this clinic must attend a two-day training session to prepare for their first client meetings and court appearances. For the Spring 2016 clinic, these all-day sessions will be held on Thursday, January 14 and Friday, January 15. Attendance is required.

    Course Bidding: In addition to ranking this clinic among experiential course selections, students should submit a statement of interest and a CV by the close of the bidding period on December 10, 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20145

    Close
    • 30106-01
    • †Criminal Justice Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Doherty
      Ullmann
      Bruce
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Criminal Justice Clinic: Fieldwork (30106). 2 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. Students must be enrolled simultaneously in the seminar and fieldwork sections of this clinic. F.M. Doherty, S.O. Bruce III, and T. Ullmann.

    Course Bidding: Students who bid on the seminar section of this clinic and who are accepted will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing tudent, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20146

    Close
    • 21039-01
    • Critical Race Theory: Seminar
    • Bridges
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment (18)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Critical Race Theory (21039). 2 units. This seminar will explore the utility of Critical Race Theory to the study of law. Specifically, this seminar will analyze the centrality of the law in constructing and maintaining -- as well as dismantling -- racism, racial inequalities, and race itself. Weekly seminar meetings will consist of discussion of a broad range of materials, including case law, scholarly writing in law, scholarly writing in anthropology, political theory, and journalism. The latter part of the seminar will consist of a sustained analysis of Critical Race Theory as it speaks to issues of gender and reproduction. Paper required. Enrollment limited to eighteen. K.M. Bridges.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23320

    Close
    • 30216-01
    • †Drafting and Negotiating Merger and Acquisition Transactions
    • Adler
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential (16)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Drafting and Negotiating Merger and Acquisition Transactions (30216). 2 units. The class will focus on understanding the structure and basic provisions of an acquisition agreement, highlighting the differences between the ABA Model agreement and “real-world” agreements. The class will focus on drafting and negotiation skills and students will practice drafting skills by working with a hypothetical purchase agreement. Students will then be divided into Buyer and Seller teams and participate in a simulated negotiation for the hypothetical transaction. Students will be guided by experienced M&A practitioners and investment bankers who will serve as guest coaches for the simulated negotiation. Preference given to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to sixteen. S.S. Adler.

    Note: There are no prerequisites for this course, but students are encouraged to take Business Organizations either prior to or concurrently with this class. Priority will be given to students who list this course as their first preference among the experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20216

    Close
    • 21147-01
    • Drug Product Liability Litigation
    • Grossi
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:15 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Drug Product Liability Litigation (21147). 2 units. More product liability lawsuits are filed against drug manufacturers than all other industries combined. As one scholar put it, the pharmaceutical industry is now “tobacco-land in terms of how much people hate it,” and drug product liability litigation is a “growth industry.” This course, taught by a practitioner with vast experience trying such cases, will consider the theory and practice of such litigation. At the outset, we will focus on the similarities and differences between pharma cases and other product liability cases, using the Diet Drug cases tried by the instructor as a model. We will then consider the doctrines governing such lawsuits—such as “failure to test”; inadequate warning; preemption of claims by federal regulation; learned intermediary; medical causation; and various forms of damages—discussing those issues both in their classic formulation in a single lawsuit, but also in the way those principles are applied in mass litigation, where there may be several thousand individual cases and multiple trials. The course will also consider the practical aspects of those cases, such as the special evidentiary problems when doctors are witnesses; techniques to present scientific material to juries; approaches to trial examination; and jury selection strategies. Course Requirements: Short mid-term “bench" memorandum: (40 percent); self-scheduled final (open book; 50 percent); class participation (10 percent). Self-scheduled examination. P. T. Grossi, Jr.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20218
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 60 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 30169-01
    • †Global Health and Justice Practicum: Fieldwork
    • Kapczynski
      Miller
      Gonsalves
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Global Health and Justice Practicum: Fieldwork (30169). 2 units. A fieldwork-only section of the Global Health and Justice Practicum. Students must be enrolled in the seminar and fieldwork sections simultaneously. Permission of the instructors required. A. Kapczynski, A. Miller, and G. Gonsalves.

    Course Bidding: Students who are accepted in the Global Health and Justice Practicum: Seminar will be automatically enrolled in the fieldwork section.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20158

    Close
    • 21664-01
    • *Global Inside Counsel: The Challenges of an In-House Lawyer in an Increasingly Integrated World
    • Solender
      Cutler
    • Thu 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility
    • faculty permission (20)
    • exam required
    Expand

    *Global Inside Counsel: The Challenges of an In-House Lawyer in an Increasingly Integrated World (21664). 2 units. This course will explore the challenges faced by a senior in-house lawyer in today’s increasingly integrated international business environment. We will do so through a series of problems faced by the legal staff of multi-national corporations. The "cases" in this course pose questions about how to confront legal and ethical issues in many different national markets, using specific illustrations drawn from the contemporary business world -- e.g., the Sony hacking incident, the investigation of J.P. Morgan’s hiring in China, the European Union’s antitrust case against Google, Walmart’s challenges arising from the fire in the Bangladesh installation. These cases involve a broad range of considerations: ethics, reputation, risk management, international public policy and politics, communications and corporate citizenship. The course will explore the skills needed by inside counsel to address these challenges, the increasingly global role of in-house counsel in large corporations, and the challenges to the profession from this demanding new form of legal practice.Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to twenty. Self-scheduled examination. M.S. Solender.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among their permission-of-the-instructor selections, interested students should submit, by December 10, at 4:30 pm, a CV and a statement of interest including a description of any business-related coursework they have completed (whether in law school or elsewhere) or other business-related experience they have had (i.e., employment, extracurricular activities).

    Note: The New York State Court of Appeals has declined to approve this course for satisfaction of the professional responsibility requirement as part of eligibility to sit the New York Bar Examination. The course will satisfy the Law School professional responsibility graduation requirement but not the New York eligibility to sit the bar requirement.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20215
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 30168-01
    • †Global Health and Justice Practicum: Seminar
    • Kapczynski
      Miller
      Gonsalves
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Global Health and Justice Practicum (30168) and Fieldwork (30169). 4 units (2 units for each component).This course will fuse didactic and experiential learning on critical topics at the intersection of public health, rights, and justice in the twenty-first century. Through a weekly seminar and real-world projects, students will develop the knowledge and tools to engage critically and constructively with contemporary global health issues. Students from different disciplines will work in teams on projects, typically with outside partners, to address key mediators of health in the US and worldwide, with particular attention to concerns about health equity. Seminar readings and project approaches will draw from legal, public health, historical, anthropological, and other fields to introduce students to the multiple lenses through which health issues can be tackled, and to build their competence to work with colleagues in other disciplines around such interventions.

    Projects are selected with an eye toward the application of both public health and legal expertise, and students will be expected to reflect on ethics and methods in an interdisciplinary context. Previous GHJP projects have focused, for example, on analyzing and documenting the public health, scientific, and legal ramifications of the Ebola quarantines in the US; building a framework for UN accountability for the introduction of cholera to Haiti; addressing barriers to access to new hepatitis C treatment in low and middle income countries; reforming the compensation system for miners with silicosis, tuberculosis, and other occupational lung disease in Southern Africa; and addressing the US policy response to obstetric fistula.

    There will be several clinic projects for spring 2016, and student interest will be taken into account when selecting project teams. Projects for next semester will include: (1) challenging anti-abortion legislation in Brazil, with an NGO partner in Brazil, and (2) working with a US NGO partner to analyze the health and human rights impact of ‘diversion courts’ as a response to the failed strategies of enforcing prostitution law at the local level in the U.S.. A third project will likely relate either to health and human rights issues in the garment sector in India, or campaigning for open access to data from clinical trials in the U.S.

    Students will work on projects in teams and be evaluated by their work product rather than a final exam. Students should be prepared to spend up to 10 hours outside of class each week (on average) on their projects, and for possible travel (typically during spring break) depending on the project. Resources will be available for travel for students as needed.

    The course will be designed for a mix of public health students and law students, though select students from other disciplines may also be admitted. This course meets the YSPH OPHP practicum requirement for Masters/Public Health Students. This course will meet according to the Law School calendar. Permission of the instructors required and an application must be submitted by the deadline noted below. Because the demand for the course is high, interviews may be conducted this year to select the final group of students for the practicum. These interviews will most likely happen by phone and in mid-December, shortly after the application deadline.

    Enrollment will be limited to twelve students. Note: We may also establish special sessions and makeup sessions to accommodate the difference between schedules on the main campus and in the Law School. Law Students accepted in the practicum section will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section. Both sections must be taken simultaneously. This course will meet according to the Law School calendar. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to twelve. Also CDE 596b. A. Kapczynski, A. Miller, and G. Gonsalves.



    IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN APPLYING:
    • Yale Law School Students: In addition to listing the course among experiential course selections, students should submit a CV and statement of interest. In the statement, law students should describe their interest in work on global and local health issues, as well as any relevant courses or other experience.
    • Yale Public Health students should submit a CV and a statement of interest in policy and legal issues related to health, and any relevant courses or other experiences at the law/policy/health intersection.
    • Yale Graduate Students outside of public health and law may be admitted to the course, and should write the instructors about the application materials required. In the past, students from the Jackson Institute, the medical and management schools have been enrolled, and the course is open to any graduate or professional student at Yale.

    Law students should submit the materials by 4:30 p.m. on December 10 to the YLS registrar through the bidding system. All other students should send materials to Katy Lawder at Health.justice@yale.edu by 4:30 p.m. on December 10.

    Note: Because project work begins immediately, and is collaborative and intense, this is not a class that students will have the opportunity to "shop." Enrollment in this class presumes a serious commitment of time, and projects immediately engage students in collective responsibilities; accordingly, there is a no-drop policy for this class
    Note:Students accepted in the practicum section will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section. Both sections must be taken simultaneously.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20157

    Close
    • 21226-01
    • How Constitutions Change: Seminar
    • Albert
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    How Constitutions Change: Seminar (21226). 2 units. This seminar will study the forms of constitutional change—amendment, revision, interpretation, evolution and revolution—from comparative, doctrinal, historical and theoretical perspectives. We will draw from a variety of countries and regions, including Canada, France, Germany, India, Israel, Japan, Mexico, South Africa, Turkey, the United Kingdom as well as Europe and the Caribbean. Topics include the political and philosophical foundations of constitutional amendment, the procedures and purposes of constitutional change, the relationship between formal and informal amendment, the status and enforceability of unwritten constitutional norms, the theory and doctrine of unamendability, the consequences of amendment difficulty, and the relevance of contemporaneity in the ratification of a proposed constitutional change. Response papers required periodically. Final paper required. Enrollment limited. R. Albert.

    Note: Interested students should please plan to attend the first meeting.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23503

    Close
    • 21773-01
    • Inside the White House Situation Room: Innovations in Statecraft
    • Spence
    • Mon 2:30 PM-4:20 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Inside the White House Situation Room: Innovations in Statecraft (21773). 2 units. An intensive graduate seminar about the evolving tools of statecraft and U.S. foreign policy decision-making. This seminar will take students inside the White House Situation Room to examine the policy, legal, and practical considerations surrounding key tools available to policymakers – covert action, cyber warfare, Special Forces operations, defense diplomacy, trade and economic statecraft, financial sanctions, and social media. The seminar will focus on the practical dilemmas facing current policymakers and skills needed to advise the President. The seminar will include guest lectures by current and former senior U.S. policymakers and business leaders to provide a first-hand perspective about how these tools are used in practice. Students will be required to produce documents that closely resemble what the National Security Council staff is called on to produce, including decision memoranda for the President, speeches and congressional testimony by the Secretary of State and Secretary of Defense, briefing points for the President’s Daily Intelligence Briefing, lawyers group memoranda, and talking points for the President’s meeting with heads of state. Students will write short papers throughout the term. Also GLBL 757b. Limited enrollment. Permission of the instructor required. M.J. Spence.

    Note: If the course is oversubscribed, Professor Spence will ask students for a short statement of interest and a CV at the first class meeting. This course will follow the Graduate School calendar.

    Note: If you are interested in this course, you should attend the first class meeting. The first class meeting will be on Monday, January 25.

    Location: ASH40 - A422 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24224

    Close
    • 21283-01
    • International Commercial Arbitration
    • Reisman
      Gaillard
      Banifatemi
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
      Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
      Thu 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    International Commercial Arbitration (21283). 2 units. International commercial arbitration has increased as a function of world trade. This seminar will examine systematically and comparatively, through statutes, rules, national and international cases, and treaties, the establishment, operation, and implementation of awards of international arbitration tribunals; the role of national courts in compelling, facilitating, and enforcing or vacating arbitral awards; and policies currently under consideration for changing arbitral practices. Enrollment will be capped at twenty. Scheduled examination or paper option. W.M. Reisman, Y. Banifatemi, and E. Gaillard.

    Note: This class will meet three times per week between January 25 and February 19.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    SLB - 110 (Wed)
    SLB - 110 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20086
    Exam: 5/09/2016 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 6 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your name.

    Close
    • 21422-01
    • Internet Law
    • Mulligan
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Internet Law (21422). 2 units. An introduction to the legal and policy issues raised by computers and the Internet. This course will explore how the Internet's digital and networked environment changes the nature of regulation, unleashes innovation, and refashions the relationships among public and private actors. Topics will include jurisdiction, free speech, privacy, intellectual property, e-commerce, and internet governance. Self-scheduled examination. C. Mulligan.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20183
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21700-01
    • Investment Funds: Regulation and Structure
    • Morley
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment (20)
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Investment Funds: Regulation and Structure (21700). 2 units. This class will survey the structure, regulation, and taxation of investment funds. We will read the formation documents for hedge funds and private equity funds and survey the regulations that apply to these funds under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. We will then survey mutual funds and their regulation under the Investment Company Act of 1940. We will also consider the taxation of each of these types of funds. We will try to engage broad questions of an economic nature, but we will focus principally on legal structuring, rather than investment strategy. Enrollment limited to twenty. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. J. Morley.

    Course Bidding: In addition to ranking this course among limited enrollment bids, you should submit a statement of 200 words or less explaining your interest in the course. Statements should be submitted by December 10, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20193
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21322-01
    • Islam and Democracy in the Modern Middle East
    • March
    • Fri 1:30 PM-3:20 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment (5)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Islam and Democracy in the Modern Middle East (21322). 2 units. This seminar will study the development of regimes of government in Muslim countries since the nineteenth century. Focus will be on early constitutional movements, the rise of political Islam, the management of religion in various twentieth-century states, the Iranian revolution, and the growth of Salafi ideas, culminating in the ISIS "caliphate." Paper required. Enrollment capped at twenty-five, with five places reserved for Law students. Also PLSC 377/PLSC 776/EP&E 249/RLST 288/RLST 728. A. F. March.

    Note: This course will follow the Yale College calendar. The first class meeting will be on Friday, January 29.

    Location: RKZ - 102 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23558

    Close
    • 21323-01
    • Just Causes of War: Evidence from War Manifestos
    • Hathaway
      Shapiro
    • Thu 9:10 AM-10:00 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Just Causes of War: Evidence from War Manifestos (21323). 2 units. Open only to students who completed the fall course. Permission of the instructors required. O. Hathaway and S.J. Shapiro.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 25283

    Close
    • 21325-01
    • Law and Disruptive Technology
    • Balkin
      Crootof
      Ard
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission (15)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Law and Disruptive Technology (21325). 2 units. This research seminar will study the interplay of law and technological change. We will consider the nature of disruptive technology, the goals of innovation, and the regulatory challenges posed by new technologies. Case studies will focus on driverless cars, Big Data analytics, 3-D printing, autonomous weapon systems, net neutrality, civilian drones, and cyberwarfare. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Permission of the instructors required. J.M. Balkin, F.E. Ard, and R. Crootof.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should also submit a statement of interest by the close of the spring early registration period on December 10, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: ASH40 - A420 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23282

    Close
    • 21651-01
    • [The] Law of the Sea
    • Reisman
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] Law of the Sea (21651). 2 units. This seminar will examine a variety of contemporary issues concerning the law of the sea, such as immigration, piracy, environmental protection, fisheries, maritime security, maritime delimitation, the exclusive economic zone, the deep seabed, and the South China Sea. In doing so, the seminar will also cover the most recent international legal disputes concerning the law of the sea, such as Philippines v. China, Mauritius v. United Kingdom, Australia v. Japan, Bolivia v. Chile, and Bangladesh v. India. Enrollment will be capped at fifteen. Scheduled examination or paper option. Also GLBL 591b/F&ES 863b. W.M. Reisman.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20084
    Exam: 5/05/2016 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your name.

    Close
    • 21491-01
    • Law, Language and Cognition: Seminar
    • Solan
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment (15)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Law, Language and Cognition: Seminar (21491). 2 units. This seminar will explore various issues concerning how well society can govern itself under a rule of law in light of various aspects of the human language facility. Much of the course will address questions of statutory interpretation, and to a lesser extent, contractual interpretation. Such issues as the tension between plain language and intent, the nature of indeterminacy in legal texts, and the possibility of default rules to simulate actual linguistic understanding, will be discussed. Other topics will include the role of the jury in applying laws, and linguistic issues that arise in multilingual legal contexts, such as the interpretation of EU directives, and international treaties and conventions. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. L. M. Solan.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20101

    Close
    • 30194-01
    • *†Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Seminar
    • Bhandary-Alexander
      Blank
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Seminar (30194) and Fieldwork (30195). 2 units, for each component, 4 units total. Students may elect credit/fail and must do so by the stated deadline each term. Students must be enrolled in the seminar and fieldwork components simultaneously. Students in the New Haven Legal Assistance Immigrant Rights Clinic (IRC) will represent immigrants and their organizations in court, before administrative agencies, and in the legislature. IRC is based at New Haven Legal Assistance (LAA), a historic non-profit civil legal services office whose mission is to secure justice for and to protect the rights of those residents of New Haven County unable to engage legal counsel.

    The clinic will be a legal resource for immigrant communities and their organizations. Through their advocacy and coursework, students in the clinic will learn to practice as legal services lawyers representing immigrants and their organizations. Students can expect to work both on individual cases and on policy matters arising from needs in the community. Community partners will refer cases to the clinic, and there will be no substantive area of law excluded from consideration.

    Referring community organizations will likely include Junta for Progressive Action, a non-profit service provider and advocacy organization (http://juntainc.org/en/); Unidad Latina en Acción, a grassroots membership-based community organization (https://ulanewhaven.org/); and Haven Health Clinic, a student-run primary care clinic in the Fair Haven neighborhood (http://www.havenfreeclinic.org/hfc/). Enrollment limited to ten to twelve. J. Bhandary-Alexander and D. Blank.

    Course Bidding: In addition to ranking the seminar section of this clinic among experiential course selections, students should submit a one-to-two page personal statement and a CV by the close of the bidding period on December 10 at 4:30 p.m. Students who are accepted in the clinic seminar will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance (all versions); or Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23697

    Close
    • 30195-01
    • †Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Bhandary-Alexander
      Blank
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Fieldwork (30195). 2 units. Students must enroll simultaneously in the seminar and fieldwork components of this clinic. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to ten or twelve. J. Bhandary-Alexander and D. Blank.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23709

    Close
    • 30172-01
    • †Liman Project: Incarceration and Reform
    • Kalb
      Baumgartel
      Fernandez
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Liman Project: Incarceration and Reform (30172). 2 units, credit/fail with a graded option. This project will enable students to learn about the law of and to work on understanding facets of incarceration. One ongoing project involves studying how prisons use and regulate long-term isolation (sometimes called “solitary confinement,” or “restricted housing” or “administrative segregation”) and working on how to reduce the numbers of persons in isolation and the degrees of isolation for those in such placements. A national survey is underway, and additional data collection and analyses will be done, along with more research on the law and policies related to isolation. Another project focuses on the role gender plays in incarceration, in terms of the ways in which women and men are classified, placed in facilities, and the programs and rules imposed. Again, the goals include research and reform. Students work in teams and meet regularly with supervisors. With permission, students may elect to write a related Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper for additional graded credit. The projects usually span more than one semester and have, on occasion, resulted in published articles. Permission of the instructors required. J. Kalb, S. Baumgartel, and L. Fernandez.

    Course Bidding: Students should provide a brief statement of interest and a C.V. by December 10, 2015, at 4:30 p.m. The instructors will only consider the statement of interest, not the weighted preference, in determing who is accepted, so students should list this course as their lowest preference among experiential course selections.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20156

    Close
    • 21534-01
    • Liman Workshop: Rationing Law: Human Rights, Incarceration, and Criminal Justice Reform
    • Kalb
      Baumgartel
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Liman Public Interest Workshop: Human Rights, Incarceration, and Criminal Justice Reform (21534). 2 units, credit/fail. This workshop will consider the role of international human rights in U.S. social movements related to the law of prisons and criminal justice reform. Lawyers are increasingly integrating human rights law and strategies to advance their domestically-focused advocacy efforts. Our discussion will critically explore the drivers and impacts of these strategies in the context of American mass incarceration. We will begin the semester by exploring the challenges of defining a set of universal rights, with a particular focus on the influence of the United States. We will then consider the challenge of rights enforcement as it relates to questions of American sovereignty, culture, democratic politics, foreign policy, and federalism. We will explore the efficacy and legitimacy of the multi-faceted strategies that advocates have adopted to advance human rights law, inside and outside the courts, through UN and regional mechanisms, and in the mobilization of grassroots communities. Through a study of contemporary campaigns – including movements to end the criminalization of homelessness, to eradicate the death penalty, and to reduce the use of solitary confinement in prisons – we will explore the promise of domestic human rights strategies, their relationship to more familiar forms of mobilization, and related challenges and limitations. Over the course of the semester, students in the workshop will write four response papers of no more than 2-double-spaced pages. A limited number of students may take write a longer paper and receive graded credit with permission of the instructors. J. Kalb.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20073

    Close
    • 21652-01
    • Moral Dilemmas in Humanitarian Action
    • Karunakara
    • Wed 9:25 AM-11:15 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Moral Dilemmas in Humanitarian Action (21652). 2 units. This course will discuss cases that examine ethical and moral dilemmas in the delivery of humanitarian assistance at the organizational, operational, and individual levels. Two 2,500-word papers, based on student presentations, required. Limited to five Law students. Permission of the instructor required. Also GLBL 791b. U. Karunakara.

    Note: This course will meet according to the Graduate School calendar. First-day attendance is required; no drops will be permitted after the first class meeting.

    Location: WTS - B51 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24548

    Close
    • 21774-01
    • Non-State Actors and Global Governance
    • Hyde
    • Tue 1:30 PM-3:20 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Non-State Actors and Global Governance (21774). 2 units. What are non-state actors and what role do they play in global governance? How can international politics be understood without an exclusive focus on state-centric theories? How do non-state actors influence international politics and domestic politics? Can we treat all non-state actors as similar in international relations theory? What theoretical framework is most useful to analyze non-state actors? When and how do they matter? Can we understand international politics without attention to non-state actors?

    The goal of the course is to explore international relations theory as it pertains to the study of non-state actors, such as international organizations, transnational corporations, NGOs, transnational advocacy networks, and terrorist networks. Issues of global governance will be central. Students will develop a working knowledge of some of the major issue areas surrounding non-state actors in international relations. In addition, students will complete a 1- semester research project on a subject of their choice, with some of the course devoted to research design. Seminar participation and presentations required. Two three-to-five page critiques plus one research paper required. Permission of the instructor required. Also GLBL 902b. S. Hyde.


    Note: If you are interested in this course, you should attend the first class meeting to learn whether you are accepted.

    Note: This course will follow the Graduate School calendar.

    Location: WLH - 210 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24295

    Close
    • 21772-01
    • Private Law Remedies: Theory, Law, and Practice
    • Brooks
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Private Law Remedies: Theory, Law, and Practice (21772). 2 units. Over the last decade there has been a revival of sorts in private law theory, with particular emphasis on private law remedies. This seminar will explore the theoretical literature on private law remedies along with the case law and doctrines that undergird this theory. Subject matter areas include property, torts, restitution and unjust enrichment, fiduciary relations and especially contracts. Statutory, equitable and legal remedies—including compensatory damages, disgorgement, injunctions, declaratory judgments, rescission, reformation, liquidated and punitive damages—are considered across subject matter areas from a historical, jurisprudential and functional economic perspective. These perspectives well highlight competing normative aims of remedies, such as corrective, distributive and retributive justice in addition to expressive and instrumental concerns relating to promoting certain behaviors, deterring others, aligning incentives and enhancing efficiency. With respect to some remedies, the seminar will also offer a comparative perspective by addressing modern remedial approaches in China, national European regimes, commonwealth countries and elsewhere. Self-scheduled examination. R.R.W. Brooks.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23930

    Close
    • 21080-01
    • †Research Methods in American Legal History
    • Kauffman
      Shapiro
      Nann
      Widener
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    †Research Methods in American Legal History (21080). 2 units. This seminar will examine the methods and major materials used in American historical legal research, whether for scholarly pursuits or professional advocacy. It will cover early judicial, statutory, and constitutional sources; court records; government documents; biographical materials and personal papers of lawyers and judges; other manuscript collections; and early sources of U.S. international law and civil law. Paper required. S.B. Kauffman, J.B. Nann, F. Shapiro, and M. Widener.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20120

    Close
    • 21460-01
    • Treaties and Other International Agreements in International and National Law
    • Reisman
      Brilmayer
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Treaties and Other International Agreements in International and National Law (21460). 2 units. The focus will be on the law of treaties and other international agreements from the perspective of international law and United States constitutional law. At that interface, we will be especially concerned with the problems associated with making enforceable agreements in a legal system that lacks enforcement institutions; the incorporation of agreements in domestic law and questions arising about their implementation there; the termination of agreements; the effect of provisional application regimes; modus vivendi and unratified agreements. Enrollment will be capped at twenty-five. Scheduled examination or paper option. L. Brilmayer and W. M. Reisman.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20085
    Exam: 5/07/2016 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your name.

    Close
    • 30199-01
    • †Trial Practice
    • Pottenger
      Wizner
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:30 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Trial Practice (30199). 2 units, credit/fail. An introduction to trial evidence and to the techniques and ethics of advocacy in civil and criminal trials. Students will act as lawyers in simulated trial situations. The instructors will be judges and experienced trial lawyers from the community will provide instruction and critique. Enrollment limited to seventy-two. J.L. Pottenger and S. Wizner.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting and a decision whether to take the course at the conclusion of the first class are mandatory.

    Course Bidding: Permission of the instructors is not required for this experiential course. Students who list the course among their experiential course selections will be admitted up to the maximum number of seventy-two.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20180

    Close
    • 30123-01
    • *†Veterans Legal Services Clinic
    • Parkin
      Li
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Veterans Legal Services Clinic (30123) and Fieldwork (30124). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). The clinic and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. There are approximately 250,000 veterans currently residing in Connecticut, many with acute and unique legal needs related to their military service or return to civilian life. In this clinic, students represent Connecticut veterans in a range of individual litigation and institutional advocacy matters. Pending individual matters include (1) benefits applications for veterans who have suffered PTSD, sexual assault, and other injuries, in the first instance, on administrative appeal, and on judicial review of administrative denials; and (2) discharge upgrade applications, on administrative appeal and in U.S. District Court. Students also represent local and national veterans organizations in Freedom of Information Act litigation in U.S. District Court; civil rights litigation arising from sexual assault, and other-than-honorable discharges of service members suffering undiagnosed PTSD; and federal and state regulatory and legislative advocacy concerning veterans' employment issues, criminal justice matters, treatment of service members with PTSD and military sexual assault and rape. The seminar portion is a practice-oriented examination of advocacy on behalf of veterans and of social justice lawyering generally. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. J. Parkin, B. Li, and M. VandenBroek.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among your experiential course selections, you must also submit a statement of interest in the clinic and a copy of your resume by the close of early registration on December 10, at 4:30 p.m. Students who are accepted in the clinic will be enrolled in the fieldwork section as well.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 23711

    Close
    • 30124-01
    • †Veterans Legal Services Fieldwork
    • Parkin
      Li
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Veteran Legal Services Fieldwork (30124). 2 units. Must be taken in conjunction with the Veteran Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. J. Parkin, B. Li, and M. VandenBroek.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in both the seminar and the fieldwork sections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 23712

    Close
    • 30127-01
    • *†Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic
    • Parkin
      Hallett
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic (30127) and Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). Students will represent immigrants and low-wage workers in Connecticut in labor, immigration, and other civil rights areas, through litigation for individuals and non-litigation advocacy for community-based organizations. In litigation matters, students will handle cases at all stages of legal proceedings in Immigration Court, Board of Immigration Appeals, U.S. District Court, the Second Circuit, and state courts. The non-litigation work will include representation of grassroots organizations, labor and faith organizations in regulatory and legislative reform efforts, media advocacy, strategic planning, and other matters. The seminar portion is a practice-oriented examination of advocacy on behalf of workers and non-citizens and of social justice lawyering generally. The course will be a two-term offering (4 units each term). The clinical course and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously in both terms. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. N. Hallett and J. Parkin.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing the clinic experiential permission courses, interested students should submit a resume and a statement of interest by December 10, 2015, at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Students admitted to WIRAC must confirm their participation in advance of the first class by a date designated by the instructors.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20172

    Close
    • 30128-01
    • †Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy: Fieldwork
    • Parkin
      Hallett
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. The clinical course and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously in both terms. N. Hallett and J. Parkin.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in both the seminar and the fieldwork sections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the follow non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20173

    Close
    • 21027-01
    • †Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources
    • Kauffman
      Harrison
      Nann
      Krishnaswami
      VanderHeijden
    • Tue 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Thu 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Skills
    • open enrollment (25)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources (21027). 2 or 3 units. An advanced exploration of the specialized methods and sources of legal research in some of the following areas: secondary legal authority, case law, statutory authority, legislative history, court rules and practice materials, and administrative law. The course will also cover the legal research process, and tracking research as well as other strategies for efficient and effective legal research. Class sessions will integrate the use of online, print, and other sources to solve legal research problems. Laptop computer recommended. Students are required to complete a series of assignments, in addition to the other course requirements. Students who wish to qualify for a third unit will need to write a paper, in addition to the other course requirements.

    Note: The Tuesday/Thursday section of this course has an enrollment cap of twenty-five students. The Monday/Wednesday section has no enrollment cap.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Tue)
    SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20078

    Close
    • 21027-02
    • †Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources
    • Harrison
      Nann
      Ryan
    • Mon 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Wed 12:10 PM-1:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Skills
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources (21027). 2 or 3 units. An advanced exploration of the specialized methods and sources of legal research in some of the following areas: secondary legal authority, case law, statutory authority, legislative history, court rules and practice materials, and administrative law. The course will also cover the legal research process, and tracking research as well as other strategies for efficient and effective legal research. Class sessions will integrate the use of online, print, and other sources to solve legal research problems. Laptop computer recommended. Students are required to complete a series of assignments, in addition to the other course requirements. Students who wish to qualify for a third unit will need to write a paper, in addition to the other course requirements.

    Note: The Tuesday/Thursday section of this course has an enrollment cap of twenty-five students. The Monday/Wednesday section has no enrollment cap.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23855

    Close
    • 30184-01
    • Advanced Global Health Justice Practicum
    • Kapczynski
      Miller
      Gonsalves
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Global Health Justice Practicum (30184). 2 or 3 units. Open only to students who have completed the basic Global Health Justice Practicum. Permission of the instructors required. A. Kapczynski, G. Gonsalves, A. Miller.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 24046

    Close
    • 30171-01
    • Advanced Global Refugee Legal Assistance
    • Heller
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Global Refugee Legal Assistance (30171). 2 or 3 units. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Global Refugee Legal Assistance. Permission of the instructors required. R. Heller and L. Finkbeiner.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23048

    Close
    • 21733-01
    • City Policing: Exploring Policies and Practices
    • Tyler
      Meares
      Esserman
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • faculty permission (5)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    City Policing: Exploring Policies and Practices (21733). 2 or 3 units. This class will reflect the access to ongoing policing in New Haven provided through partnership between Yale Law School and the New Haven Police Department. Students will propose and conduct projects that involve them in the activities of the New Haven Police Department. The projects will be supervised by Chief Dean Esserman and Professors Tracey Meares and Tom Tyler. Students interested in conducting a research project that involves policing activities should submit a proposal concerning their project and the type of access to the police department that they would like to have to conduct those projects. Past projects have included making a film about community policing; interviewing officers about disciplinary policing in different policing departments; and other projects that benefit from having cooperation with the New Haven Police Department. Students accepted for the class will work with the instructors to make a plan for their project and its final product. The Chief will manage daily supervision of the project together with members of his command staff. Professors Meares and Tyler will provide academic guidance as appropriate. Enrollment limited to five. Permission of the instructors required. T. Meares, T. Tyler, and E. Esserman.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a one-paragraph proposal concerning their project by the close of the bidding period at 4:30 p.m. on December 10.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23326

    Close
    • 21042-01
    • Corruption, Economic Development, and Democracy
    • Rose-Ackerman
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (10)
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Corruption, Economic Development, and Democracy (21042). 2 or 3 units. A seminar on the link between political and bureaucratic institutions, on the one hand, and economic development, on the other. A particular focus will be the impact of corruption on development and the establishment of democratic government. Paper (2 or 3 units) or self-scheduled examination (2 units). Enrollment limited to ten Law students. Also PLSC 714b. S. Rose-Ackerman.

    Course Bidding: Students who bid should also submit a short paragraph explaining their relevant background and interest in the course by 4:30 pm on December 10. Preference will given to first-choice students in their last year of law school or in the LLM program.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20089
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your name.

    Close
    • 21398-01
    • Criminal Procedure: Research Seminar
    • Duke
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Criminal Procedure: Research Seminar (21398). 2 or 3 units. Students will do research and writing on a topic in criminal procedure to be selected by agreement with the instructor, with the goal of producing a publishable article. Substantial Paper and Supervised Analytic Writing credit available. Paper required. Enrollment capped at eight. S.B. Duke.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20057

    Close
    • 21197-01
    • Litigating Antidiscrimination Laws
    • Kimpel
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Litigating Antidiscrimination Laws (21197). 2 or 3 units. This course (formerly titled Enforcing Antidiscrimination Laws) is intended to fuse theory with practice – to explore (1) whether and how the theories that undergird our antidiscrimination laws are enforced in our courts and (2) what advocates (in a range of contexts) can and should be doing to enhance or improve enforcement of our antidiscrimination laws. Topics covered will include:

     The Public/Private Distinction in Enforcement
     Non-Individual Plaintiffs and Standing
     Challenges Posed by Atypical Plaintiffs
     Class Certification under the Roberts Court
     Ever-Increasing Standards of Proof
     Litigating Reproduction and Parenting
     Theories of Bias and Fact Finders
     The Role of Statistical Evidence in Demonstrating Discrimination
     Monetary (Dis)Incentives for Individuals to Act
     Juries, Identity Politics, and Trial Narratives
     Programmatic Relief as a Product of Antidiscrimination Litigation
     Secret Resolutions
     Pursuing and Articulating Solutions

    Course materials will draw heavily from actual litigation materials including motion memorandum, long-form briefs, other litigation materials and secondary literature to help provide a practice-based perspective on these issues. The instructor will draw on recent experiences on the Hill and in courtrooms around the country and will encourage students to critically engage with their own life experiences to identify strategy and policy solutions moving forward.

    The course is intended to complement the Antidiscrimination Law and Employment Discrimination Law courses. Students who have taken those courses should feel free to take this course as well, although those courses are not prerequisites. Two units, based on class participation and a final examination; 3 units, based on class participation and a final paper in lieu of an examination. A limited number of students will be accepted for the paper option which can count as the Substantial Paper. Please note than only a limited number of students will be accepted for the paper option. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. K.M. Kimpel.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23321
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 5 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 30193-01
    • †Prosecution Externship and Instruction
    • Rubenfeld
      Brennan
      Silverman
    • Wed 3:30 PM-5:20 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Prosecution Externship and Instruction (30193). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical externship will assist state or federal prosecutors with their responsibilities, before, during, and after trial. Federal placements are available in the United States Attorney’s Office in New Haven or in Bridgeport. The federal caseload is varied, from drug trafficking to securities fraud to civil rights to appellate work. The State’s Attorney’s Office in New Haven, which also has a varied but faster-paced docket, generally can take one or two student placements. Federal placement requires 168 hours for three credits and state placement requires 112 hours for two credits.

    All students are required to attend weekly class sessions. These sessions are intended to cover the life of a criminal case, including the stages of investigation, charging, plea negotiation, trial, sentencing, appeal, and collateral attack. The class sessions will focus in-depth on a handful of prosecutions as examples of the foregoing stages of a criminal case. The class sessions also aim to incorporate the perspectives of different players in the criminal justice system, including the U.S. Attorney, agents, public defenders, probation officers, and judges. Woven throughout these class sessions are discussions of ethics and professional responsibility. The course covers a prosecutor’s discovery obligations under Brady v. Maryland, 373 U.S. 83 (1963); Giglio v. United States, 405 U.S. 150 (1972); and Jencks v. United States, 353 U.S. 657 (1957) (as codified at 18 U.S.C. § 3500). It also covers pertinent Model Rules of Professional Responsibility, including but not limited to Rules 3.3 (candor toward the tribunal), 3.4 (fairness to opposing party and counsel), 3.5 (impartiality and decorum of the tribunal), 3.6 (trial publicity), 3.7 (lawyer as witness), 3.8 (special responsibilities of a prosecutor), 4.1 (truthfulness in statements to others), 4.2 (communication with person represented by counsel), and 4.3 (dealing with unrepresented person).

    Students will be required to keep track of the hours they have worked. Placement at the U.S. Attorney’s Office must be arranged at least four months in advance, to allow time for security clearance procedures. Student participation in the federal program is subject to successful clearance through a federal background check. Students also apply for placement at the State’s Attorney’s Office during the previous term. Although enrollment is limited and permission of the instructors is required, timing and the involvement of outside agencies remove this clinic from the usual sign-up process for limited enrollment courses. Selection for this course takes place before limited-enrollment course bidding. Conflict check with LSO also is required. J. Rubenfeld, L. Brennan, and M. Silverman.

    Course Bidding Information: Select this course as your lowest weight among experiential course selections. Open only to students who have been pre-selected to participate. Do not select this course during pre-registration if you are not one of those students.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Note: The first class meeting will be at the Law School. Thereafter, the class will meet at the U.S. Attorney's Office.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20217

    Close
    • 21497-01
    • Seminar in Private Law
    • Markovits
      Brooks
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Seminar in Private Law (21497). 2 or 3 units. The Spring 2016 edition of the Seminar in Private Law will focus on private dispute resolution. The seminar will take up arbitration in its several varieties. The seminar will also engage other forms of dispute resolution that proceed outside of public political authority, for example, negotiations that aim to conclude armed conflicts. The seminar will ask whether certain procedures can sustain free-standing legitimacy, based directly on their own properties and entirely apart from prior legal or political authority. At least half of the seminar's sessions will involve presentations by outside speakers from law and associated disciplines. The remainder will prepare for the speaker presentations. The list of confirmed sessions and speakers is here. Term paper required for three units of credit; thought paper for two units of credit. Enrollment limited. D. Markovits and R. Brooks.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20081

    Close
    • 21717-01
    • South Asian Constitutionalism
    • Guruswamy
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    South Asian Constitutionalism (21717). 2 or 3 units. This course will seek to answer a substantial question: What accounts for enduring constitutionalism? With this in mind we will study India, Pakistan and Nepal. India and Pakistan were created out of a common land, gained freedom from the same colonizer, and yet had entirely different experiences with democratic constitutionalism. Nepal has emerged from a civil war and the dissolution of a monarchy. It is now in the midst of its second attempt at constitution-making. The course will reflect on the Indian and Pakistani experiences of constitution-making and constitutionalism, and will make suggestions for the continuing constitution-making process in Nepal. It also engages the constitution-making efforts of the first Constituent Assembly of Nepal (2007 onwards) and analyses the key choices that led to its failure.

    To address the substantial question, the course will examine four critical constitutional choices. The first is the nature of the Constituent Assembly, the method of decision-making within it and the techniques adopted to foster consensus when framing a constitution. The second is the form of government—parliamentary, presidential or semi-presidential. The third choice is the method of judicial appointments, and the role which the courts have taken upon themselves. The final choice is the role accorded to the military in the context of constitutionalism. By examining these choices, this course hopes to contribute to an understanding of constitution-making and design in general, illustrated through moments from South Asian constitutionalism. The course will aim to provide a comparative constitutional law assessment of enduring constitutionalism based on the three case study countries. Extra credit for special writing projects. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. M. Guruswamy.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20475
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 48 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21464-01
    • Theories of Statutory Interpretation: Seminar
    • Eskridge
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Theories of Statutory Interpretation: Seminar (21464). 2 or 3 units. This seminar will focus on recent theoretical and doctrinal work on matters of statutory interpretation. Authors will often present their own work; students in the seminar will research and write original papers of their own, under the instructor's supervision. Prerequisite: Legislation or Introduction to the Regulatory State. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twelve. W.N. Eskridge, Jr.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20058

    Close
    • 30107-01
    • †Advanced Criminal Justice Clinic
    • Doherty
      Ullmann
      Bruce
    • 2 to 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Criminal Justice Clinic (30107). 2 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. F. Doherty, S.O. Bruce III, and T. Ullmann.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20147

    Close
    • 21437-01
    • Feminist Legal Theory Seminar
    • Schultz
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 to 3
    • -
    • faculty permission (20)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Feminist Legal Theory Seminar (21437). 2 or 3 units. This seminar will critically examine some major intellectual traditions in second-wave American feminist theory and explore their relevance to the law. Radical feminism identifies sexuality as the crucible of gender inequality, for example, while cultural feminism points to mothering and kinship. Socialist feminists are concerned with the gender-based distribution of labor, and liberal feminists worry about gender-based exclusion from "public" spheres more broadly. Feminists of color challenge the validity of isolating gender from other categories of social existence, while feminist post-structuralists question the existence of the stable identity categories upon which some other approaches depend. Each of these traditions has found expression in legal scholarship, with authors championing distinctive (though sometimes overlapping) approaches to various areas of law. The class will examine one or more current debates within feminist legal theory to consider how the various traditions have influenced, and might still influence, the debate and the relevant law. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twenty. Permission of the instructor required. V. Schultz.

    Course Selection Information: In addition to listing this course among permission of instructor selections, students should submit a short statement describing their interest and a CV by the close of the bidding period on December 10. Students should identify their year of study in law school (first-year, second-year, or third-year) or where they are in any course of study as a non-law graduate student. Background in the subject is not necessarily required.

    Note: Class attendance is required. Weekly 2-to-5 page discussion papers are required, as well as one 15-20 page final paper.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20095

    Close
    • 30126-01
    • Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Parkin
      Li
    • 2 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork (30126). 2 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Veterans Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. J. Parkin, B. Li, and M. VandenBroek.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20177

    Close
    • 30130-01
    • Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Parkin
      Hallett
    • 2 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork (30130). 2 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. N. Hallett and J. Parkin.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20175

    Close
    • 21128-01
    • Antidiscrimination Law: Supervised Research
    • Siegel
    • 2 to 4
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Antidiscrimination Law: Supervised Research (21128). 2 to 4 units. Paper required. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. R. B. Siegel.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students must submit an abstract which offers a preliminary account of the paper, and situates it any relevant literatures. The abstract must be submitted by December 10, 4:30 p.m.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20366

    Close
    • 21343-01
    • †Advanced Legal Writing
    • Harrison
      Krishnaswami
    • Tue 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • limited enrollment (40)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Legal Writing (21343). 3 units. This course will provide practice in drafting legal memoranda and briefs. Students will have the opportunity to refine their analytical and legal research skills, as well as their writing skills. Students' written work will be reviewed and critiqued primarily by teaching assistants, who will be supervised by the instructors. The instructors will retain sole responsibility for determining each student's grade. The goal of the course will be to take students beyond basic competence to excellence in legal writing. Enrollment limited to forty. R.D. Harrison and J. Krishnaswami.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20067

    Close
    • 30101-01
    • *Advocacy for Children and Youth
    • Peters
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential (4)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Advocacy for Children and Youth (30101). 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical seminar will represent children and youth in abuse, neglect, uncared for, potentially termination of parental rights cases in the Superior Court for Juvenile Matters and certain related matters. Class sessions will focus on substantive law, ethical issues arising from the representation of children and youth in the relevant contexts, interviewing and lawyering competencies, case discussions, and background materials relating to state intervention into the family. Class will meet weekly with occasional supplemental sessions to be arranged. Additionally, students will attend weekly case supervision sessions. Casework will require, on average, ten to twelve hours weekly, but time demands will fluctuate over the course of the term; class time will be concentrated in the first half of the term. Enrollment limited to four. J.K. Peters.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, interested students must submit a signed statement of understanding the commitment to continued case work until graduation by the close of early registration on December 10, 2015, at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Due to our immediate commitments to our clients, Professor Peters will finalize the roster by email before the first class, after which the clinic cannot be dropped. Because classes prepare students for client work, attendance at all classes is mandatory.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and either of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance: Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20163

    Close
    • 21063-01
    • American Legal History
    • Priest
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    American Legal History (21063). 3 units. This course will examine the foundations of the American legal, political, and economic order from the colonial period through the early twentieth century. We will analyze the emergence of American property law, slavery, women’s legal history, intellectual property, and corporate law as well as federalism, the Constitution, and judicial review. The course readings will consist of contemporary sources, recently-published works, and classics in the field. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also HIST 761b. C. Priest.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20138

    Close
    • 30219-01
    • Anatomy of a Merger
    • Nathan
    • Wed 3:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • experiential (15)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Anatomy of a Merger (30219). 3 units. The goal of this seminar will be to explore the intimate inter-relationship of M&A transaction tactics and strategy and Delaware corporate law principles of directors' fiduciary duties of loyalty and due care, as explicated by the Delaware courts over the past thirty years. The seminar will use a hypothetical M&A transaction and readings in selected Delaware case law and commentary to illustrate how evolving legal principles shape M&A transaction structures and why detailed knowledge and understanding of Delaware legal principles are essential to M&A legal practice. Prerequisite: Business Organizations. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Permission of the instructor required. Self-scheduled examination. C. Nathan.

    Note: The class meeting time has been adjusted to accommodate Professor Nathan's travel schedule. One additional class will be arranged, but Professor Nathan will discuss the options for this make-up class once the class roster is final.

    Course Selection Information: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should submit a CV by December 10 at 4:30 p.m. Listing this course among experiential course selections constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release an unofficial copy of the student's Law transcript to the instructor.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23283
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 30161-01
    • †Capital Punishment Clinic
    • Bright
      Parrent
      Sanneh
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential (6)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Capital Punishment Clinic (30161). 6 units (3 fall, 3 spring), credit/fail, with the option of graded credit. Students who have taken the clinic in the fall term will continue to work with attorneys in representing people facing the death penalty. Two additional students may be admitted upon application as described below. Enrollment limited to six. Permission of the instructor required. S.B. Bright, A. Parrent, and Sia Sanneh.

    Course Bidding Information: If you are a new student who wishes to apply, you should list this course among experiential course selections. In addition, you should describe briefly why you would like to take the clinic; whether you will have sufficient time to devote to the clinic; past work experience (including summer work between years of law school); and what you expect or would like to do upon graduation. Include the paper or project you completed for the Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, Disadvantage class or some other example of your legal analysis and writing. Statements must be sent directly to Professor Bright (stephen.bright@yale.edu) by December 10, 2015 at 4:30 p.m.

    Students continuing from the fall term should list this clinic among their experiential course selections; list the course as the lowest bid among these selections.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20144

    Close
    • 21754-01
    • Climate Change and Clean Energy
    • Esty
    • Mon 2:30 PM-3:50 PM
      Wed 2:30 PM-3:50 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Climate Change and Clean Energy (21754). 3 units. This course will examine the scientific, economic, legal, political, institutional, and historic underpinnings of climate change and the related policy challenge of developing the energy system needed to support a prosperous and sustainable modern society. Particular attention will be given to analyzing the existing framework of treaties, law, regulations, and policy -- and the incentives they have created -- which have done little over the past several decades to change the world’s trajectory with regard to the build-up of greenhouse gas emissions in the atmosphere. What would a twenty-first-century policy framework that is designed to deliver a sustainable energy future and a successful response to climate change look like? How would such a framework address issues of equity? How might incentives be structured to engage the business community and deliver the innovation needed in many domains? While designed as a lecture course, class sessions will be highly interactive. Also F&ES 840b. Scheduled examination or paper option. D. C. Esty.

    Note: This course will meet on the Forestry and Environmental Studies calendar.

    Location: KRN - 301 (Mon)
    KRN - 301 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20060
    Exam:
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21179-01
    • Contemporary China Research Seminar
    • Gewirtz
      Williams
      Han
      Webster
    • Wed 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission (10)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Contemporary China Research Seminar (21179). 3 units. Research and writing on contemporary problems related to China, including but not limited to legal issues. The class will meet roughly six times during the semester to discuss particular China-related issues (occasionally with a guest) and at the end of the semester for student presentations of their research. The remainder of the semester the students will work on their research and writing projects and individually meet with the instructors to discuss their work. Students interested in the seminar should submit a statement of interest explaining their background related to China and research ideas they are considering. Paper required. Enrollment limited to ten. Permission of the instructors required. P. Gewirtz, S. L. Han, G. Webster, R.D. Williams.

    Note: Although this is primarily a research seminar, we will meet as a group 6 or 7 times during the semester. We expect that the usual meeting time will be on Wednesdays from 2:10-4:00pm, but that meeting time has not been completely finalized.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest by the close of bidding at 4:30 pm on December 10. The statements should include an explanation of your background related to China and research projects you are considering.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20137

    Close
    • 21217-01
    • Criminal Procedure: Adjudication
    • Duke
    • Tue 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Procedure: Adjudication (21217). 3 units. This course will cover pre-trial proceedings, plea-bargaining, right to trial by jury, effective assistance of counsel, joinder and severance, right of confrontation, prosecutorial discretion, some trial proceedings, and double jeopardy. Class participation is expected and may be taken into account in grading. Students who regularly do not attend will be dropped from the class. Criminal Procedure: Investigation is not a prerequisite. Scheduled examination. S.B. Duke.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Tue)
    SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20056
    Exam: 5/04/2016 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 30182-01
    • †Criminal Justice Reform: Theory and Research in Action
    • Meares
      Quattlebaum
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • experiential (20)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Criminal Justice Reform: Theory and Research in Action (30182). 3 units, credit/fail. We are at a pivotal moment with respect to American policing (and arguably the U.S. criminal justice system more generally). Police shootings in Ferguson, North Charleston, Cleveland, and Cincinatti —as well as the death of Eric Garner after police put him in a chokehold in Staten Island and the death of Freddie Gray after he was transported in a police van in Baltimore—have brought national attention to the questions of how police should do their jobs and even how that job should be defined. Perhaps at no point since the 1960’s, when the Kerner Commission wrote an influential report on American policing following a period of widespread urban unrest, have long-held assumptions about the purposes and methods of policing been called so deeply into question. Academics and researchers can and should be a part of the conversation about how to make policing (and all of the components of criminal justice operation) simultaneously more effective, just, and democratic.

    Participants in this workshop will explore theories (procedural justice, legitimacy, social network analysis, implicit bias, among others) and empirical findings that are being marshaled to re-think the function and form of policing. They will also engage in research projects and public policy advocacy that aim to give these ideas practical effect. Our immodest goal is that participants should have an opportunity to help define the face of American policing in the 21st century. We meet weekly; preparation and attendance at these discussions are required for credit. If you need to miss a class, please be in touch with the professors in advance of the meeting. Students missing more than two sessions without permission will not receive credit. Graded credit may be available to students who wish to write papers (including Substantial Papers and Supervised Analytic Writing papers) in connection with this course. Enrollment limited to twenty. Permission of the instructors is required. T. Meares and M. Quattlebaum.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should submit a one-paragraph statement of why they would like to join the workshop and what they hope to get out of the course. Students who hve worked on the project in previous terms should indicate that experience in their statement. Statements should be submitted by December 10 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: In addition to the regular meeting time, students accepted in this workshop should hold Tuesday from 4 pm until 5 pm for supervision meetings for their experiential work. The instructors will meet with each experiential group for one hour on most Tuesdays.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20507

    Close
    • 21525-01
    • Criminal Law
    • Rubenfeld
    • Wed 1:10 PM-2:35 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • Criminal Law & Administration
    • faculty permission (75)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Law (21525). 3 units. An introduction to criminal law. Topics to be considered in detail include the law of homicide; the problem of intent and of criminal responsibility for unintended acts; the law of rape; the special constitutional requirements applicable to criminal law; and the insanity defense. This course is given in several sections; it must be taken before graduation. Students may satisfy the graduation requirement by satisfactorily completing Criminal Law and Administration or Criminal Law, but they may not enroll in both courses. Enrollment capped at fifty-five. Permission of the instructor required. Scheduled examination. J. Rubenfeld.

    Course Bidding: Students who bid “1” for the class will of course have priority. In case of oversubscription among people bidding “1” (or if there are spaces left after the 1’s get in), primary additional factors Professor Rubenfeld will take into account include: (a) being a third-year student and having a serious conflict with the other Criminal Law section; (b) having done research work for him in the past, especially on Criminal Law topics; and (c) having special interest in, or experience with, the subject.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Wed)
    SLB - 129 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20498
    Exam: 5/03/2016 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21363-01
    • Criminal Law and Administration
    • Wilf
    • Wed 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • Criminal Law & Administration
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Law and Administration (21363). 3 units. This course is designed as a preliminary inquiry into the principles of climinal liability. The course will proceed through various doctrinal issues in substantive criminal law, including the justification of punishment, responsibility, mental state requirements, and principles of justification and excuse. Certain specific crimes, such as homicide and, as time permits, white collar crime are also examined. Self-scheduled examination. S.R. Wilf.

    Note: Although the final examination will be self-scheduled, students must complete the exam by 5 p.m. on Monday, May 9.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Wed)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23773
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/09/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Note: Although the final examination will be self-scheduled, students must complete the exam by 5 p.m. on Monday, May 9.

    Close
    • 21423-01
    • Diversity, Inclusion, Equality: Seminar
    • Ahmad
      Forman
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (18)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Diversity, Inclusion, Equality: Seminar (21423). 3 units. Questions of diversity and inclusion in higher education generally, and law schools in particular, long have been the subjects of debate and contestation. More recently, growing economic and social inequalities in American society, renewed attention to these phenomena and new vocabularies for describing them, have prompted important discussions regarding how to arrest and reverse these trends. This seminar will consider the concepts of diversity, inclusion, and equality in their current forms, and what, if any, role law schools should play in promoting them. To what extent are these three concepts overlapping, intersectional, or compatible with one another? Has the emergence of a discourse around inequality informed our understandings of diversity and inclusion, or do notions of diversity and inclusion shape our understanding of inequality? How does each concept understand difference, and does each recognize the same forms of identity as salient? Is there a productive role for elite law schools to play, or are they destined to perpetuate forms of exclusion and inequality persistent in society today? The class will couple theoretical and conceptual inquiry with a solutions-oriented approach designed to identify and articulate workable interventions that law schools might take to productively address these issues. Supervised Analytic Writing credit is not available. Substantial Paper credit is available. Paper required. Enrollment limited to eighteen. M.I. Ahmad and J. Forman, Jr.

    Note: Students are required to attend the first day of class. Attendance for the remainder of the semester is also mandatory.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20219

    Close
    • 30162-01
    • † *Education Adequacy Project
    • Rosen
      Knopp
      Moodhe
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Education Adequacy Project (30162). 3 units. The Education Adequacy Project (EAP) provides a unique opportunity for students to participate in and help lead institutional reform litigation. The EAP pursues a single complex lawsuit to ensure the State of Connecticut provides all Connecticut children with adequate and equitable educations. Students work with attorneys at Debevoise & Plimpton as well as local counsel in an integrated trial team. A major, multi-week trial is scheduled to begin in October 2015 and, barring a change in schedule, the next semester will involve supporting, attending and participating in the trial. Students have to date played a significant role in determining the case's litigation strategy. Class time is devoted to litigation strategy and discussion with supervising attorneys; training in litigation skills; and internal clinic logistics.

    New students should be aware that it may be difficult to become fully oriented with the case in the short time between the beginning of the semester and the anticipated start of trial. The clinic however will accept a limited number of new students if they are exceptionally interested and eager to participate. Permission of the instructors required. D.N. Rosen, A.A. Knopp, J.P. Moodhe, and A. Taubes.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students should send a short e-mail describing their interest in the clinic to eapdirect@panlists.yale.edu by 4:30 p.m. on December 10.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20368

    Close
    • 21745-01
    • Empirical Research Seminar
    • Tyler
    • Mon 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Empirical Research Seminar (21745). 3 units. This class will provide students with an opportunity to learn how to conduct empirical research. The class will cover the basic ideas underlying research and will examine various approaches that can be taken to research issues. Emphasis will be on learning how to use various approaches. The class will take place in the computer lab so that students can get hands-on experience using research software. Enrollment limited. Self-scheduled examination. Also PSYC. T. Tyler.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20105
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21033-01
    • Environmental Law and Policy
    • Elliott
    • Thu 10:10 AM-1:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Environmental Law and Policy (21033). 3 units. Introduction to the legal requirements and policy underpinnings of the basic U.S. environmental laws, including the Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, and various statutes governing waste, food safety, and toxic substances. This course will examine and evaluate current approaches to pollution control and resource management as well as the "next generation" of regulatory strategies, including economic incentives and other market mechanisms, voluntary emissions reductions, and information disclosure requirements. Mechanisms for addressing environmental issues at the local, regional, and global levels will also be considered. Self-scheduled examination. E.D. Elliott.

    Note: Class participation counts toward the final grade. May miss no more than three classes.

    Note: This course will follow the calendar of the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20068
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30164-01
    • *†Environmental Protection Clinic
    • Galperin
      Suatoni
      Hawkins
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential (30)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Environmental Protection Clinic (30164). 3 units, credit/fail. A clinical seminar in which students will be engaged with actual environmental law or policy problems on behalf of client organizations (environmental groups, government agencies, international bodies, etc.). The class will meet weekly, and students will work ten to twelve hours per week in interdisciplinary groups (with students from the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and other departments or schools at Yale) on projects with a specific legal or policy product (e.g., draft legislation or regulations, hearing testimony, analytic studies, policy proposals). Students may propose projects and client organizations, subject to approval by the instructor. Enrollment limited. Also F&ES 970b. J. Galperin, D. Hawkins, and L. Suatoni.

    Course Bidding: Brief statement of interest (less than 500 words) and CV required. Students should contact Professor Galperin for a list of available projects and a description of the application process in order to complete all necessary steps, in addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, before June 23 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: First-day attendance is required.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20187

    Close
    • 30166-01
    • *†Ethics Bureau at Yale: Pro Bono Professional Responsibility Advice and Advocacy
    • Fox
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • experiential (12)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Ethics Bureau at Yale: Pro Bono Professional Responsibility Advice and Advocacy (30166). 3 units. Lawyers' need for ethics advice, consultation and expert opinions is not limited to those whose clients can pay. Impecunious clients and the lawyers who serve them are in need of ethics counseling and legal opinions on a regular basis. For example, Yale law students have provided essential assistance preparing amicus briefs in numerous Supreme Court cases. A few of these cases resulted in victory for the petitioner and citations to the amicus brief in the majority opinions.

    The work of the Bureau consists of four major components. First, the Bureau provides ethics counseling for pro bono organizations such as legal services offices, public defenders, and other NGO’s. Second, the Bureau prepares standard-of-care opinions relating to the conduct of lawyers, prosecutors and judges that are required.

    In cases alleging ineffective assistance of counsel and other challenges to lawyer conduct. Third, from time to time, the Yale Ethics Bureau provides assistance to amici curiae, typically bar associations or ethics professors, on questions of professional responsibility in cases in which such issues are front and center. It did so in a United States Supreme Court case, Maples v. Allen, citing the amicus brief of the clinic. Fourth, the Bureau provides ethics opinions for the National Association of Public Defenders, position papers for various American Bar Association entities, articles for law reviews and other publications, and editorials on topics of current interest.

    The twelve students working at the Bureau meet for class two hours per week and are expected to put in approximately ten hours on Bureau projects each week. The classroom work explores the law governing lawyers, but also considers the role of expert witnesses in the litigation process, its appropriateness and the procedural issues thereby raised. No prerequisites. Preference given to prior Ethics Bureau enrollees and students who previously took the instructor’s ethics class. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of the instructor required. L. Fox.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among the experiential course selections, interested students should also submit a short statement of interest by the close of the bidding period on December 10 at 4:30 p.m. In the statement, students should describe their interest in participation in the ethics bureau and any relevant background.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is required. There is a no-drop policy for this course.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20150

    Close
    • 21715-01
    • Ethics of War and Peace
    • Shapiro
    • Mon 1:35 PM-3:00 PM
      Wed 1:35 PM-3:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (6)
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Ethics of War and Peace (21715). 3 units. This course will integrate an exploration of Western moral traditions and ethical philosophy with the unique legal and moral obligations placed upon those in government who make decisions regarding the use of U.S. military force and those in the military who practice the profession of arms. Methodology: facilitated seminar discussions and case study analyses spanning the breadth of issues that arise in armed conflict: just war theory, law of armed conflict, conscientious objection, military justice, humanitarian intervention, terrorism, and drone warfare, among others. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to six Law students. Scheduled examination or paper option. Also PHIL 730b S.J. Shapiro and V. Kemper.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20119
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 21482-01
    • Family Law
    • Schultz
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Family Law (20018). 3 units. This course will address the regulation of intimate relationships between adults (marriage and divorce, civil unions, prenuptial contracts, reproductive technologies, etc.), between parents and children (child custody, adoption, termination of parental rights, etc.), and the involvement of the state in intimate, sexual and reproductive life generally (constitutional privacy and equal protection). The interplay among the State, family, and market, and the formation of personal identity in and through these arenas, will be explored throughout the course. Issues of socioeconomic class, gender, race, and sexuality will arise in many of the areas we study over the course of the semester. Scheduled examination. V. Schultz.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    SLB - 121 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20094
    Exam: 5/05/2016 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30211-01
    • †Financial Markets and Corporate Law Clinic
    • Macey
      Fleming
      Beirne
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential (12)
    • paper required
    Expand

    †Financial Markets and Corporate Law Clinic (30211). 3 units. The purpose of this clinic will be to introduce students to public policy debates in the regulatory context. We will endeavor to apply public choice theory and modern theories in corporate finance to debates about the content of regulation and public policy. In this clinic, students and faculty will work collaboratively to generate actual comment letters as well as publishable academic research regarding proposed regulation by such institutions as the SEC, the Fed, the FDA, the Comptroller of the Currency, and others. In formulating policy statements, students will be encouraged to be cognizant of the value of markets and the need to improve the quality of public decision-making in areas related to the regulation of corporate governance and capital markets. Open only to J.D. students. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of the instructors required. J.R. Macey, B.L. Beirne, and G. Fleming.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20161

    Close
    • 21421-01
    • [The] First Amendment
    • Post
    • Mon 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Tue 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    [The] First Amendment (21421). 3 units. This course will discuss the theory and doctrine of the First Amendment protections for freedom of expression. Enrollment will be capped at eighty. Preference will be given to second- and third-year students. Self-scheduled examination. R.C. Post.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 22230
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 48 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21757-01
    • [The] Foundations of Legal Scholarship
    • Kahn
      Klevorick
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission (8)
    • paper required
    Expand

    [The] Foundations of Legal Scholarship (21757). 3 units. During the second semester of the legal scholarship seminar, students will reflect on legal scholarship and workshop their own writing. Open only to Ph.D. in Law students and first-year J.S.D. students who completed Foundations of Legal Scholarship in Fall 2015. In all cases, enrollment in this semester of the seminar is only by permission of its instructors. Paper required. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructors required. P.W. Kahn and A.K. Klevorick.

    Location: SLB - L48 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20075

    Close
    • 30170-01
    • *†Global Refugee Legal Assistance
    • Heller
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Global Refugee Legal Assistance (30170). 3 units. This seminar and practicum will introduce students to international refugee law, with an emphasis on fieldwork. Class sessions will combine project rounds with a consideration of the development and content of the international refugee legal regime, U.S. policy toward refugees, and the particulars of the Iraqi and Syrian refugee crises. Additionally, students will work in pairs under the supervision of private attorneys to provide legal representation to refugees in the Middle East in urgent humanitarian situations seeking resettlement in a safe third country. Guest lecturers will include practitioners and scholars in the field of refugee law. Permission of the instructor required. R. Heller and L. Finkbeiner.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20214

    Close
    • 21020-01
    • Guns in the United States
    • Meares
      Papachristos
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Guns in the United States (21020). 3 units. Guns are an important part of American society and culture. With more than 270,000,000 guns held by private citizens and a Constitutional amendment associated with gun ownership, the possession, regulation, meaning, and use of firearms reaches into important realms of American society, including: civil rights and liberties, identity and cognition, crime and violence, and public health and personal safety. This course explores the multifaceted role guns play in the U.S. by surveying historical, sociological, psychological, legal, and political research. From a firm foundation of the historical and constitutional origins of the 2nd amendment, the course will focus on a range of topics around Guns in America, including: the prevalence and distribution of guns; attitudes and opinions about gun ownership, possession and use; illegal and legal gun markets; gun crime and injuries; and the varieties of responses to gun injuries and crime, including, importantly the legislative and political processes that attend their development. This course will meet according to the Yale College calendar. Paper required. Also SOCY 509b. T. Meares and A. Papachristos.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Tue)
    SLB - 122 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20182

    Close
    • 21615-01
    • Immigration Law and Policy
    • Gelernt
    • Tue 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Mon 6:10 PM-7:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Immigration Law and Policy (21615). 3 units. This course will survey the legal and historical considerations that shape U.S. immigration law. The course will review the constitutional basis for regulation of immigration into the United States and the constitutional rights of noncitizens in the country; the structure of the immigration bureaucracy; immigration federalism; the statutory and administrative frameworks for admission and removal of noncitizens; administrative and judicial review; and habeas corpus in the immigration context. The course also will touch on refugee and asylum law as well as examine a series of current issues such as immigration policies enacted in the aftermath of 9-11, immigration detention, enforcement, and the scope of executive power to enact administrative forms of relief from deportation. Enrollment capped at forty. Self-scheduled examination. L. Gelernt.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Tue)
    SLB - 122 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20063
    Exam: 5/03/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 30113-01
    • *†Immigration Legal Services
    • Peters
      Zonana
    • Mon 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential (4)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Immigration Legal Services (30113). 3 units, credit/fail. A clinical seminar involving class sessions and casework. The clinic will specialize in the representation of persons who are seeking asylum through affirmative procedures or in removal proceedings or post-asylum relief. Class sessions will focus on the substantive and procedural law, on the legal and ethical issues arising in the context of casework and on the development of lawyering skills. Classes will be heavily concentrated in the first half of the term, with additional sessions supplementing the weekly class time. Students will also attend weekly supervisions on their case work. Enrollment limited to four. J.K. Peters and H.V. Zonana.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.

    Note: Due to our immediate commitments to clients, Professor Peters will finalize the roster by email before the first class, after which the clinic cannot be dropped. Because classes prepare students for client work, attendance at all classes is mandatory.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20165

    Close
    • 21687-01
    • Information Privacy Law
    • Jolls
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Information Privacy Law (21687). 3 units. Controversy over information privacy has grown dramatically in recent years. Information that many individuals view as private is gathered and deployed using a growing number of new technologies and practices – on-line tracking, “Big Data” analytics, facial recognition software, genetic testing, and much more. Constitutional, statutory and common law have sought to respond to rapid changes in information gathering, storage, and dissemination. This course will provide a broad-ranging overview of the rapidly growing area of information privacy law. The required written work will be four four-page analytic essays, due over the course of the term, on the course concepts and materials, and a research paper that may be used in satisfaction of either the Supervised Analytic Writing requirement (in which case the course should be taken for 4 rather than 3 units) or the Substantial Paper requirement. Paper required. Enrollment limited. C. Jolls.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20072

    Close
    • 21744-01
    • Innovation in Government and Society
    • Braverman
    • Tue 2:40 PM-5:40 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Innovation in Government and Society (21744). 3 units. Across the globe, communities of every size face the same urgent imperative: rising demand for services running headlong into the reality of limited resources. The emerging answer--from some unlikely places--is bold, rapid management innovation. These disruptive moves are transforming the 21st century state. Some of the most broadly applicable, cutting-edge innovations come from the edge: communities that believe they have no choice but to take bold risks. Others come from the most developed areas, which feel more pressure than ever to do more with less. This interdisciplinary course on Innovation in Government and Society will blend perspectives from management, public policy, and law in exploring why communities must innovate in the delivery of public services and how ideas from the public sector, private sector, and civil society are shaping the future of public management. The course will include hands-on work to help advance innovation in communities in developing countries or areas affected by natural disaster or war, in partnership with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). This course will meet according to the School of Management calendar. Enrollment limited to eight law students. Permission of the instructor required. Also MGT 866b/GBLS 697b. E. Braverman.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission of the instructor selections, students should submit a short statement of interest and a resume by the close of the bidding period on December 10, at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: EVANS - 4220 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23596

    Close
    • 21695-01
    • [The] Institutional Supreme Court
    • Greenhouse
    • Mon 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
      Wed 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (30)
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] Institutional Supreme Court (21695). 3 units. This course will examine the Supreme Court from the perspective of its institutional role and the behavior of its members. Since the aim is a better understanding of how constitutional law is made, our focus will be on the making, rather than on the substantive law. Readings will be drawn from current and past cases, briefs and argument transcripts as well as political science literature on judicial behavior, public opinion, the appointment process, and other topics. Students who wish to write a paper in lieu of the exam must present a proposal before Spring break and receive the instructor's permission. Enrollment limited to thirty, with preference given to first-year J.D. students. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. L. Greenhouse.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    SLB - 121 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20065
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 344.5 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21722-01
    • Introduction to the Regulatory State
    • Eskridge
    • Wed 1:10 PM-2:35 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (80)
    • exam required
    Expand

    Introduction to the Regulatory State (21722). 3 units. This course is an introduction to the modern regulatory state, with an emphasis on legislation, administrative implementation, and statutory interpretation by judges as well as by agencies. Because of the focus on statutory interpretation, this course is a substitute for the advanced course in Legislation, but it is not a substitute for the advanced course in Administrative Law. Enrollment limited to eighty, with preference given to first-year J.D. students. Self-scheduled examination. W.N. Eskridge, Jr.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Wed)
    SLB - 127 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20059
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 30115-01
    • †Landlord/Tenant Legal Services
    • Pottenger
      Dineen
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential (8)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Landlord/Tenant Legal Services (30115). 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical seminar will provide legal assistance, under the supervision of clinical faculty, to low-income tenants facing eviction in the New Haven Housing Court. Topics to be covered in discussions and class materials will include the substantive law of landlord-tenant relations, the Connecticut Rules of Practice and Procedure, ethical issues arising in the representation of clients, social and housing policy, and the development of lawyering skills, particularly in interviewing, litigation, negotiation, and mediation. Weekly class sessions and supervision sessions, plus eight to twelve hours per week of casework. Enrollment limited to eight. F.X. Dineen and J.L. Pottenger, Jr.

    Note: Attendance at first class meeting is required. A no-drop policy will apply thereafter.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and anyof the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20494

    Close
    • 21716-01
    • Law Reform and Gender-Based Violence
    • Anderson
      Goldscheid
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (20)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Law Reform and Gender-Based Violence (21716). 2 units. Gender-based violence has been the subject of concerted advocacy globally for several decades, yet it continues to exact stark tolls on individuals, families and communities throughout the world. Legal reform efforts, spanning multiple doctrines in criminal and civil law, have engaged experts from a wide range of disciplines and generated robust debate, even among those with shared commitments to acknowledging and ending abuse.

    This seminar will use the lens of law reform to examine theories, strategies, and doctrines aimed at gender-based violence. Faculty draw upon an interdisciplinary range of theoretical and empirical frameworks to explore the tensions among them, with a particular focus on the ways that differing strategies implicate conceptions of identity, equality, and autonomy, and intersect with issues of race, class, culture, sexuality, and gender identity, among other axes of experience. Readings and class discussions cover selected topics of current debate. Students will study key issues, cases and commentary to analyze competing theories and strategies, and to understand the issues facing survivors and their advocates. The seminar calls upon students to consider the successes and limitations of previous reform efforts and to contemplate directions for the future. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twenty. M. Anderson and J. Goldscheid.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20213

    Close
    • 30191-01
    • †Legal Assistance
    • Dineen
    • Fri 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Legal Assistance (30191). 3 units, credit/fail. A clinical seminar, using classroom, field work, and simulation experiences in the general area of legal assistance for the poor. Students will work eight to twelve hours per week in a local legal aid office and will attend weekly classroom sessions. The seminar will be practice-oriented, moving from developing solutions for specific client problems to general discussions of landlord-tenant, consumer, domestic relations, welfare, and other legal subjects of special concern to the urban poor, as well as issues of broader social policy. The seminar will also focus on the development of professional responsibility and lawyering skills, such as interviewing, negotiating, counseling, drafting, and litigation. A few placements for criminal defense work in state court will also be available. Enrollment limited to six to eight. F.X. Dineen.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic andany of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 23590

    Close
    • 21227-01
    • Legislation
    • Solan
    • Tue 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Legislation (21227). 3 units. This course will examine issues relating to the enactment, application, and interpretation of legislation, primarily at the federal level. The course will introduce students to the basic contours of congressional lawmaking practice, theoretical models of the legislative process, the application and interpretation of statutes by the executive branch, and numerous aspects of judicial statutory interpretation. Students will explore and critique the different methods and canons that courts apply in construing statutes and consider such issues as the appropriate degree of deference to administrative interpretations, judicial use of legislative history in construction, and interaction between the courts and Congress. Self-scheduled examination. L.M. Solan.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Tue)
    SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20102
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 30118-01
    • †Legislative Advocacy Clinic
    • Pottenger
      Knopp
      Geballe
      Scalettar
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential (15)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Legislative Advocacy Clinic (30118). 3 units, credit/fail. This clinical seminar will give students an opportunity to participate in the state legislative and policy-making processes by advancing – and defending – the interests of a Connecticut public interest organization of their choice. Clinic students may select their projects from a range of options supplied by the faculty, or they may approach the clinic with an organization/cause already in mind. Recently, students in the clinic have focused on public health, fair housing, workers' rights, juvenile justice, tax policy, and women’s health. One of our long-time clients (Connecticut Voices for Children) is a key player on a broad spectrum of policy issues affecting Connecticut families. The clinic’s work includes both affirmative legislative initiatives and defensive efforts to respond to proposed legislation deemed inimical to the interests of its clients.An orientation to Connecticut's politics and demographics, as well as issues of ethics and professional responsibility for lawyers working in the legislative arena will be important foci of this clinic. In the fall term, students will develop policy proposals, participate in training sessions led by some of Connecticut’s most experienced lobbyists, meet with state legislators, and work with their client organizations to identify upcoming legislative issues. Once issues have been chosen for action, students will research the subject, work in coalition with other organizations, prepare and present “white papers,” and meet with legislators. In the spring, students will meet with legislators to get their bills introduced, develop oral and written testimony in support thereof, identify other witnesses, shepherd their bills through the committee process, and work to get them adopted. During the legislative session, students will also monitor other proposed legislation that might affect the clinic’s clients. To allow all students to participate in both the training/issue development and direct action aspects of the clinic’s work, priority will be given to students who commence their participation in the Fall term. Enrollment limited to fifteen. J.L. Pottenger, Jr., S.D. Geballe, A.A. Knopp, and E. Scalettar.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is required. A no-drop policy will apply.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20167

    Close
    • 21678-01
    • *Military Justice
    • Fidell
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    *Military Justice (21678). 3 units. This course will explore the character and function of military justice today. Topics will include the constitutional rights of military personnel; court-martial jurisdiction and offenses; trial and appellate structure and procedure; collateral review; the roles of commanders, Congress, the Supreme Court, and the President; unlawful command influence; the role of custom; and punishment. Current issues such as the treatment of sexual offenses, military commissions, government contractors and other civilians, command accountability, military justice on the battlefield, judicial independence, and the application of international human rights norms to military justice will be addressed. The class will consider issues of professional responsibility, how the military justice system can be improved, and what, if anything, can be learned from the experience of other countries. The primary text will be Fidell, Hillman & Sullivan, Military Justice: Cases and Materials (LexisNexis, 2d ed., 2012). Self-scheduled examination. E. R. Fidell.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20061
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/14/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your name.

    Close
    • 30119-01
    • †Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic
    • Pottenger
      Gentes
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential (18)
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic (30119). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical seminar will represent homeowners fighting foreclosure in Connecticut state courts. They will conduct motion practice and discovery, including legal research and writing.Affirmative litigation against lenders, and a wide-ranging "amicus practice," also are important pieces of the clinics work. Although this is primarily a litigation clinic, many of the clients are also participating in court-annexed mediation, in an effort to restructure their mortgages, so students will also gain experience in client counseling and ADR. Students will also provide brief advice and assistance to pro se homeowners at the courthouse. Enrollment limited to eighteen. J.L. Pottenger, Jr., and J. Gentes.

    Note: Attendance at first class meeting is required. A no-drop policy will apply.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20168

    Close
    • 21712-01
    • Nietzche's Critique of Modernity
    • Kahn
      Kronman
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (15)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Nietzsche's Critique of Modernity (21712). 3 units. Nietzsche was critical of many aspects of the modern age that we generally associate with liberal values. These include equality, tolerance and the rule of law. What was the basis of his criticism? What alternative, if any, did he propose? We will examine some of the key concepts of Nietzsche's philosophy with these questions in mind. Readings will include The Birth of Tragedy, The Gay Science, The Genealogy of Morals, and other works. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Also PHIL 735b. P.W. Kahn and A.T. Kronman.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20079

    Close
    • 21382-01
    • *Professional Responsibility
    • Robinson
    • Tue 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    *Professional Responsibility (21382). 3 units. This course will provide an overview of the central doctrines regulating lawyers' conduct. It will explore how professional regulation shapes both understanding of professionalism and of broader legal practice. It will pay particular attention to the different activities lawyers perform, the different environments in which they work, and the different clients that they represent, as well as strategies to address the gap in access to legal services in the United States. The legal profession is undergoing market, demographic, and technological changes that will reshape legal practice and its regulation in the coming decades. This course is designed to equip students to contextualize and understand these transformations. Self-scheduled examination. N. Robinson.

    Note: This course has been approved by the New York State Court of Appeals and will satisfy the New York requirement on professional responsibility for eligibility to sit the New York bar examination.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Tue)
    SLB - 129 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23278
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/09/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 5 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21071-01
    • Quantitative Corporate Finance
    • Ayres
    • Tue 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Quantitative Corporate Finance (21071). 3 units. This course will introduce students to some of the fundamentals of financial economics. Topics will include net present values, the capital asset pricing model, the efficient capital market hypotheses, event studies, and option theory. Students will need to learn to use electronic spreadsheet software such as Excel. Grades will be based on weekly computer problem sets and on an open-book final examination. Scheduled examination. I. Ayres.

    Location: ASH40 - A420 (Tue)
    ASH40 - A420 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20048
    Exam: 5/04/2016 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21372-01
    • The Regulation of Labor Relations
    • Becker
    • Wed 3:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    [The] Regulation of Labor Relations (21372). 3 units. This course will examine the law governing employee organizing, union representation, and collective bargaining in the United States. The primary focus will be on the private sector and thus on the National Labor Relations Act of 1935, as amended, but the course will also examine key legal controversies in public sector labor relations. Self-scheduled examination. C. Becker.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 23279
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21463-01
    • Sexuality and the Law
    • Stein
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Sexuality and the Law (21463). 3 units. This course will look at legal issues relating to sexuality, focusing on topics related to sexual behavior, sexual orientation, gender, and gender identity. The course will consider these issues from constitutional, statutory, and policy perspectives with particular attention to questions relating to families, reproduction, and discrimination. This is an interdisciplinary course that cuts across constitutional law, criminal law, family law, employment discrimination, education, and bioethics. Self-scheduled examination. E.D. Stein.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20104

    Close
    • 21711-01
    • Sociology of Law
    • Kohler-Hausmann
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment (15)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Sociology of Law (21711). 3 units. What does it mean to study law from a sociological perspective and what is gained by doing so? This course is addressed to those broad questions. The first part of the class will start with a theoretical overview of seminal texts in the field, including Marx, Weber and Durkheim. It will also introduce various methodological approaches to the contemporary sociology of law, with a focus on qualitative methods.

    The second part of the class will focus on a particular slice of sociology of law, namely the study of legal organizations or bureaucracies. Bureaucracy is a form of social organization fundamental to modern society. Law on the books comes to be law in action largely through legal bureaucracies, weather it is through courts, administrative agencies, welfare offices or the compliance department of a private firm. In addition to exploring seminal texts on the concept of bureaucracy and organizations, this course will ask the following questions: Why is it important to study the organizational structure in which legal rules are interpreted and applied? How do formal qualities of legal bureaucracies—that is, the way in which the site organizes the work of presenting and adjudicating legal rights or claims—shape the precise way people experience certain legal regimes?

    Instead of focusing on one specific site or subject matter, this class will investigate a set of conceptual and theoretical tools that can be used to study various legal sites. The readings may cover the following specific legal bureaucracies: criminal courts, police organizations, sexual harassment and anti-discrimination compliance offices of private firms, welfare offices, administrative agencies, and law school admissions offices. Together we will explore how the sociology of law, bureaucracy and organizations can be used to ask penetrating questions about how legal rules come to have the specific pattern of use (or nonuse), enforcement (or nonenforcement), costs and benefits for the people and activities which they address. Students will be expected to write frequent reaction papers to the readings and submit a final paper based on a short research inquiry into a specific legal organization of their choice. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. I. Kohler-Hausmann.

    Note: Interested students should plan to attend on the first day.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20077

    Close
    • 21713-01
    • Structures of the Constitution: Supervised Research Seminar
    • Rodriguez
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission (8)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Structures of the Constitution: Supervised Research Seminar (21713). 3 units. This directed research seminar will provide students with the opportunity to write a research paper under the instructor's supervision, but it will not involve class meetings. Papers will be supervised remotely, with one or two in-person meetings during the semester. Research papers must relate to some aspect of constitutional structure, such as federalism or separation of powers. Students must submit a brief proposal, no longe than one page, outlining the subject and potential arguments of their papers. Paper required. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructor required. C. Rodriguez.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a tentative paper proposal of no more than one page. Listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of the student's Law transcript to the instructor.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20087

    Close
    • 30180-01
    • †Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic
    • Greenhouse
      Balkin
      Pincus
      Rothfeld
      Kimberly
      Hughes
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Supreme Court Advocacy (30180). 6 units (3 fall, 3 spring). This course is a continuation of the fall clinic and is open only to those who have completed the clinic's fall term. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of instructors required. L. Greenhouse, A. Pincus, C. Rothfeld and J.M. Balkin.

    Note: This course is open only to J.D. students.

    Course Bidding Information:Only continuing students should list this course among their experiential course selections, using their lowest priority. No new students will be accepted for the spring.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20154

    Close
    • 21100-01
    • U.S. International Taxation
    • Samuels
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    U.S. International Taxation (21100). 3 units. This course will cover the basic principles of U.S. international income taxation. We will examine how the United States taxes both so-called (1) inbound transactions (income earned by foreign persons from investing and doing business in the United States), and (2) outbound transactions (income earned by U.S. persons from business activities and investments outside the United States). The principal focus of the course will be on how the United States taxes income earned by U.S. corporations from doing business outside the United States. Topics will include the foreign tax credit; the controlled foreign corporation rules; transfer pricing; and income tax treaties. We will also consider international tax planning strategies currently used by U.S. multinational corporations, including so-called "inversion," and explore recently proposed changes to U.S. international tax law and policy. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. Enrollment capped at thirty-five. Self-scheduled examination. J.M. Samuels.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20090
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 5 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your name.

    Close
    • 21430-01
    • White Collar Criminal Defense: Critical Issues and Strategies
    • Zornow
    • Fri 9:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    White Collar Criminal Defense: Critical Issues and Strategies (21430). 3 units. This course will consider the legal, ethical and strategic challenges facing white-collar criminal defense lawyers, both those representing individuals and those representing entities, in this era of few trials and pressure to cooperate with the government. We will examine all stages of white-collar representations, including the financial and psychological dimensions of being retained; developing information (through internal investigations and otherwise) and controlling the flow of information to the prosecutor and other defense counsel (including through joint defense agreements); persuading prosecutors not to bring charges; negotiating with the prosecutor for immunity or cooperation agreements for individuals and corporations (including deferred prosecution agreements); assertions of the Fifth Amendment privilege; the tension between individual and corporate representations; plea or trial strategies (including the use of jury consultants) and approaches to sentencing; and parallel proceedings (including investigations by the SEC, state AGs, foreign law enforcement authorities, and private civil litigation). We will consider how the defense lawyer can succeed in disproving Dylan's observation that “you can't win with a losing hand.” Students must have taken at least one course in criminal law or criminal procedure. Regular “response” or "hypothetical" papers will be required throughout the term. Permission of the instructors required. D. Zornow.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, each applicant must provide no more than 200 words explaining his or her classroom and real-world experience (if any) with criminal law/procedure and with white collar criminal investigations/prosecutions/civil regulatory regimes and how this seminar would contribute to their academic and/or professional goals and interests. These statements should be submitted through the online system by 4:30 p.m. on December 10.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20107

    Close
    • 30174-01
    • †Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic
    • Silk
      Metcalf
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3 or 4
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30174). 3 or 4 units. Open only to students who have completed the Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. J.J. Silk and H.R. Metcalf.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20171

    Close
    • 21763-01
    • International Law
    • Hathaway
    • Mon 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3 or 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    International Law (21763). 3 or 4 units. This course will offer an introduction to international law. Students will learn the basic minimum that every lawyer should know about the international dimensions of law in the modern world. The course is also meant to serve as a gateway to the rest of the international law curriculum: It will offer a foundation on which students who are interested in further study of the particular topics covered in the class can later build. The course will cover both the public and private dimensions of international law, offering an introduction to varied topics including international trade, international tax, international business transactions, environmental law, criminal law, human rights law, and the law of armed conflict. The course will also offer an introduction to domestic law topics that intersect with international law, including foreign relations and national security law. As each new topic is introduced, the class will not only examine that new topic in detail, but will also explore how it relates to what the class has already discussed. By considering together topics usually taught separately, students will begin to see how different subjects under the broad umbrella of international law are interconnected. And by learning about a variety of issue areas and making direct comparisons across them, students will gain an understanding of each topic that can be had only by viewing it in a comparative perspective. Students who take the examination will earn 3 units; students who elect a paper option, with the instructor's approval, will earn 4 units. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. O. Hathaway.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Mon)
    SLB - 127 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20069
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 5 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 30175-01
    • *†Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic
    • Schulz
      Balkin
      Manes
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3 or 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic (30175). 3 or 4 units, credit/fail for students in their first semester, graded for students in their second semester. Students in the clinic will work on all aspects of cases involving press freedom, open government, free speech, and related issues. Clients include investigative journalists, traditional and new media organizations, activists, advocacy organizations, researchers and academics. Pending matters typically include litigation under the First Amendment and Freedom of Information laws in both federal and state courts. The clinic's cases involve a diverse array of issues, focusing in particular on national security, surveillance, privacy, technology and government accountability. Students may also have the opportunity to engage in non-litigation advocacy and client counseling. The seminar will focus on substantive law, case discussions, skills training, and ethical issues. Students will have the opportunity to write related research papers. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. D. Schulz, J. Manes, and J.M. Balkin.

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who list this course among their experiential course selections should also submit a statement of interest and a CV to the instructor (jack.balkin@yale.edu) by December 10, at 4:30 p.m. Students should also indicate if they have previously applied to the course.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is mandatory for admitted students and for those on the waiting list who wish to remain in consideration for admission if a place becomes available. Because clinic work begins immediately, and is collaborative and intense, admitted students will be given early notice and asked to confirm their commitment to the course before the opening of the add/drop period. The last day for admitted students to drop the course is the day following the first class session.

    Location: ASH40 - A420 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 20169

    Close
    • 21077-01
    • A Community of Equals
    • Fiss
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    A Community of Equals (21077). 4 units. Should the law be used for eradicating patterns of inequalities that mark American society and if so, how? The inequalities that are the subject of this seminar and the required research papers will be defined broadly, including those based on race, class, gender, sexual orientation, language, nationality, or immigration status. Special attention will be given in our weekly meetings, however, to the recent assaults on the Second Reconstruction by the Supreme Court and the manifold practices, including mass incarceration, inner city policing, and school assignment policies, that have led to the emergence and perpetuation of the black underclass. Enrollment limited. O.M. Fiss.

    Course Bidding:If the seminar is oversubscribed: (1) Twelve students will be chosen on a random basis from those listing the seminar as a first choice; (2) the remaining number of students will be selected from those first-choice bidders who submit a one-page memorandum indicating some special background or special interest with the subject matter of the seminar.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20693

    Close
    • 21601-01
    • Administrative Law
    • Parrillo
    • Tue 2:05 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:05 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Administrative Law (21601). 4 units. There are vast areas of life in which much (often most) lawmaking and legal interpretation fall to administrative agencies, rather than to legislators and judges. Examples include the functioning of markets in securities, telecommunications, and energy; the safety of food, drugs, cars, airplanes, and workplaces; the regulation of pollution, public land use, advertising, immigration, election campaigns, and union organizing; and the distribution of all kinds of social welfare benefits. This course will introduce the legal and practical foundations of the administrative state, considering rationales for delegation to administrative agencies, procedural and substantive constraints on agency rulemaking and adjudication, judicial review of agency actions, and the relationship of agencies to Congress and the President. Self-scheduled examination. N. Parrillo.

    Note: As with law courses generally, enrollment for this course is limited by the capacity of the law school's largest classroom (150 students). In one previous instance, enrollment in this course was near that limit. If the number of students who express interest in this course exceeds that capacity, allocation of seats will take into account both the expressed weighted interest and the year in law school; seats on the waiting list will take into accout these same factors.

    Note: Although the examination is self-scheduled, because of the size of the class, all examinations for this course must be submitted by 12 noon on Tuesday, May 10.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20082
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/10/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Note: Although the examination is self-scheduled, because of the size of the class, all examinations for this course must be submitted by 12 noon on Tuesday, May 10.

    Close
    • 21068-01
    • Antitrust
    • Priest
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Antitrust (21068). 4 units. This course will survey the law and economics of antitrust, including horizontal agreements, monopolization, and vertical arrangements. The course will presume students to have no training in economics, but it will aspire to remain of interest to students with substantial economics backgrounds. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. G.L. Priest.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20117
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: NameOrId
    Length: 24 hour(s)
    Notes: You may use either your name or your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21204-01
    • Bankruptcy
    • Schwartz
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Bankruptcy (21204). 4 units. This course will concern both business and consumer bankruptcies. It will ask: why is a federal bankruptcy procedure necessary? What normative goals should animate that procedure? When should insolvent firms be reorganized rather than liquidated? How should macro-stresses affect bankruptcy law? What is the relation between an ex post insolvency law and the ex ante investment and other behavior of firms? How can a consumer bankruptcy law best resolve the tradeoff between insurance--the discharge--and incentives--holding people to their obligations? A casebook will form the basis of the readings, and there will be considerable stress on learning the law as well as the economics of bankruptcy. Self-scheduled examination. A. Schwartz.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Tue)
    SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20093
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.5 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21274-01
    • Business Organizations
    • Romano
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Business Organizations (21274). 4 units. A survey of the law of business organizations, emphasizing the control, management, and financing of publicly owned corporations. The key problem for corporate law is one of agency relations -- how to align management's incentives with shareholders' interests. The course will accordingly examine how legal rules, markets, and institutional arrangements mitigate, or magnify, the agency problem. Scheduled examination. R. Romano.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20088
    Exam: 5/02/2016 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21418-01
    • Business Organizations
    • Macey
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Business Organizations (21418). 4 units. An introduction to the business corporation laws affecting the rights and roles of corporate boards of directors, senior executive officers, and shareholders, with an emphasis on large, publicly traded firms. Shareholders' economic interests are examined from the perspective of limited liability and dividend standards, expectations of liquidity or transferability of shares, and the use of debt capital as a mode of financing corporate activity. Shareholders' limited participation rights in corporate decision making will be examined from the perspective of state and federal rules governing shareholder voting and the disclosure of corporate information and the notion of managerial expertise (e.g., as evidenced by judicial application of the "business judgment rule"). The latter part of the course will focus on directors' and officers' fiduciary obligations to shareholders, examining the operation of these duties in a variety of settings and transactions. Issues relating to the roles and functions assumed by corporate attorneys (with respect to their clients) and the role of business corporations within society will also be addressed. Self-scheduled examination. J.R. Macey.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Tue)
    SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20080
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21426-01
    • Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, and Disadvantage
    • Bright
    • Mon 10:10 AM-1:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • faculty permission (35)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, and Disadvantage (21426). 4 units, graded, with a credit/fail option. This course will examine issues of poverty and race in the criminal justice system, particularly with regard to the imposition of the death penalty. Topics will include the right to counsel for people who cannot afford lawyers, racial discrimination, prosecutorial discretion, judicial independence, and mental health issues. Paper required. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to thirty-five. S.B. Bright.

    Course Bidding Information: Please describe briefly why you would like to take the course; what, if any experience or interest you may have with regard to capital punishment and criminal justice, past work experience of any kind (including summer work between years of law school); and what you expect or would like to do upon graduation. Be sure to include your name and year in law school. Send the statement by e-mail to stephen.bright@yale.edu. Students will be selected for the class upon review of their submissions. Statements must be submitted by December 10, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    SLB - 121 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20050

    Close
    • 21044-01
    • Comparative Law
    • Whitman
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Comparative Law (21044). 4 units. An introduction to the comparative study of different legal systems. The course will focus primarily on differences between the ways that law and order are maintained, and justice pursued, in the United States, on the one hand, and in Germany and France, on the other. There will also be some attention to some non-Western traditions, such as those of China, Japan, and Islam. The overarching aim of the course will be to explore the extent to which differences in legal doctrine and legal practice reflect larger differences in social structure. With that aim in mind, the course will explore a variety of issues, among them differences in the French, German, and American concepts of "human dignity" and its protection; differences in civil and criminal procedure; differences in punishment practice; differences in the maintenance of everyday order in the streets; differences in the law of consumer protection; differences in welfare and unemployment law; and differences in the structure and regulation of business and banking enterprises. It is hoped that students will come away from the course both with some knowledge of foreign law and with a heightened sensitivity to some of the ways in which foreign societies can differ from our own. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. J.Q. Whitman.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Mon)
    SLB - 122 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20106
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21046-01
    • [The] Constitution: Philosophy, History, and Law
    • Ackerman
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] Constitution: Philosophy, History, and Law (21046). 4 units. An inquiry into the foundations of the American Constitution, at its founding and at critical moments in its historical transformation--most notably in response to the Civil War, the Great Depression, and the Civil Rights Movement. Philosophically speaking, do we still live under the Constitution founded by the Federalists, or are we inhabitants of the Second or Third or Nth Republic? Institutionally, in what ways are the patterns of modern American government similar to, and different from, those in post-Revolutionary (1787-1860) and post-Civil War (1868-1932) America? Legally, what is or was the role of constitutional law in the organization of each of these historical regimes? Through asking and answering these questions, the course will try to gain a critical perspective on the effort by the present Supreme Court to create a new constitutional regime for the twenty-first century. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also PLSC 842b. B. Ackerman.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20045
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 48 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your name.

    Close
    • 21524-01
    • Corporate Taxation
    • Alstott
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Corporate Taxation (21524). 4 units. The United States has a "classical" or two-level corporate tax system, which aims to tax corporate income twice: once when earned at the corporate level and again when distributed to individual shareholders. This corporate "double tax" is problematic because its policy rationale is thin and its implementation is tricky. This course will focus on both the policy and the technical aspects of taxing corporations. On the policy side, it will consider current and past proposals to integrate the corporate tax with the individual income tax. On the technical side, it will consider the tax problems that arise when corporations engage in transactions with their shareholders or with other corporations, including contributions, distributions, and reorganizations. Note:This course is open only to J.D. students. Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation. Short paper required. Self-scheduled examination. A.L. Alstott.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Tue)
    SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20046
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID. You may use ctl+f.

    Close
    • 30109-01
    • *†Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic
    • Forman
      Shaffer
      Gohara
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic (30109). 4 units, credit/fail for students in their first semester. After the first semester, students enroll in the Advanced EOJJ Clinic for 1 to 4 units, credit/fail or graded at student option. The Equal Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic (EOJJC) is undergoing a transition in our docket. In the past, the clinic has represented children in expulsion hearings and in general educational advocacy in the New Haven School District. Beginning this spring we will represent organizational clients on one or more policy/advocacy projects designed to disrupt the school to prison pipeline, reduce school suspensions and expulsions, improve the quality of education for incarcerated juveniles, and generally create a more humane juvenile justice system. Our precise docket will be set by the beginning of the spring semester.

    Because we have an existing docket of individual adolescent clients in the New Haven area, new students joining the clinic will also partner with a third-year student already in the clinic to assume individual representation of one or more current clients. That work typically involves making sure that our clients receive the educational services--including special education services--to which they are entitled and occasionally appearing in juvenile court as educational advocates for clients with delinquency cases.

    Some class sessions function like a traditional seminar--we discuss readings about the education and juvenile justice systems, as well as readings on effective advocacy and persuasion. We also use class time to discuss clinic projects, with teams of students presenting their work to the group for feedback. In addition to our seminar, each team of students meets regularly with one or more of the supervising attorneys to discuss their individual cases or projects. This clinic is open only to J.D. students. J. Forman, M.S. Gohara, and E.R. Shaffer.

    Commitment: Student commitment has two components. For the new clinic projects, students commit to two semesters (Spring 2016 and Fall 2016). For the individual client representation, your commitment will vary depending on the case. Your commitment is to your client, which means that the clinic, and you, will represent them for as long as they have educational advocacy needs. Sometimes this may be a matter of months; other times it may continue until graduation. But don't think of the commitment as a burden: as current EOJJC students will tell you, representing their clients is a privilege that brings great benefits.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and either of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20148

    Close
    • 21277-01
    • Evidence
    • Carter
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Evidence (21277). 4 units. A survey of the United States' approach to the production of evidence. Although the major focus will be the Federal Rules of Evidence, the course will also study constitutional principles and philosophical arguments. We will do some comparative work as well. Scheduled examination. S.L. Carter.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20053
    Exam: 5/06/2016 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21050-01
    • Federal Income Taxation
    • Schizer
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal Income Taxation (21050). 4 units. An introductory course on the federal income taxation of individuals and businesses. The course will provide an overview of the basic legal doctrine and will emphasize statutory interpretation and a variety of income tax policy issues. The class will consider the role of the courts, the Congress, and the IRS in making tax law and tax policy and will apply (and question) the traditional tax policy criteria of fairness, efficiency, and administrability. Topics will include the definition of income, tax shelters, the interest deduction, and capital gains. No prerequisites. A midterm examination and class participation will be factored in determining the final grade. Enrollment capped at 125. Self-scheduled examination: Answers Only. D.M. Schizer.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Mon)
    SLB - 120 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20091
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.5 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21352-01
    • Federal Jurisdiction
    • Amar
    • Mon 8:40 AM-10:00 AM
      Tue 8:40 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:40 AM-10:00 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal Jurisdiction (21352). 4 units. This course will examine the relationship between federal courts and coordinate branches of the federal government, the interactions between state and federal courts, and the interplay of state and federal laws. Scheduled examination. A.R. Amar.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Tue)
    SLB - 128 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20505
    Exam: 5/04/2016 at 2:00 PM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: 4 or 24 hours. Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21351-01
    • Intellectual Property: The Law of Scientific and Cultural Production
    • Kapczynski
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Intellectual Property: The Law of Scientific and Cultural Production (21351). 4 units. This course will introduce students to the law governing scientific and cultural production. The course will focus on intellectual property law, but will also address other modalities that sustain such production, such as government funding and the commons. We will cover the conventional IP subjects in some detail (patent law, copyright law, and trademark), but in the context of a broader framework investigating the proper goals and tools of information policy. Students will gain a basic overview of the relevant black letter law, as well as an introduction to theoretical debates about the proper grounds of information policy, and debates about important policy issues in the contemporary realm of information policy, such as file sharing and global access to medicines. Self-scheduled examination. A. Kapczynski.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Tue)
    SLB - 129 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20074
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21209-01
    • International Business Transactions
    • Chua
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    International Business Transactions (21209). 4 units. An introduction to the formation, regulation, and global impact of international business transactions. The primary focus of the course will be on the legal and practical aspects of cross-border transactions, including the structuring, negotiation, and documentation of the relevant arrangements. A secondary focus will be on the broader economic, political, and social context and consequences of international business transactions. Case studies from Latin America, Asia, the former Soviet Union, and the Middle East will be used. Topics to be discussed include privatization, project finance, letters of credit, conflicts of law, extraterritoriality, sovereign debt restructuring, expropriation, corruption, and the relationships among markets, democracy, and "culture." Enrollment will be limited to seventy. Permission of the instructor required. Paper required. A. Chua.

    Course Selection Information: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest and a CV by 4:30 pm on December 10.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20054

    Close
    • 21009-01
    • International Human Rights: Law, Policy, Strategy
    • Koh
    • Mon 9:00 AM-10:30 AM
      Wed 9:00 AM-10:30 AM
      Fri 8:30 AM-10:00 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    International Human Rights: Law, Policy, Strategy (21009). 4 units. This course will ask: How can human rights advocates better operationalize twentieth-century tools to achieve better twenty-first-century human rights outcomes? It will examine case studies at the intersection of law, politics, policy, and institutions to determine how to achieve better human rights policy outcomes. Too often, human rights advocates -- both inside and outside governments -- fail to achieve their desired outcomes because they cannot manage politics, harness incentives and institutions, or deploy law in a way that operationalizes the principles they value. This course will begin with an overview of the institutions, strategy, law, and process of human rights. We will then explore a number of case studies that illustrate cutting-edge human rights problems, and the various tools that may be employed for their resolution. The course will close with a series of student presentations identifying current issue areas ripe for new and better human rights strategies that might help attack these critical questions. There are no prerequisites but some background in international law or human rights is preferred. An examination, in-class presentation, and regular class participation are required. No paper option. Scheduled examination. H.H. Koh.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among general enrollment selections, students should submit statements on their background in international law or human rights by the close of the early registration period on December 10.

    Note: Professor Koh prefers students be present the first day of class, and if you are enrolled at the end of the drop period, a no-drop policy applies thereafter.
    Note: The Friday meeting times shown on the schedule are for make-up classes. Professor Koh will announce the dates of these meetings during the semester.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Mon)
    SLB - 127 (Wed)
    SLB - 122 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20076
    Exam: 5/04/2016 at 2:00 PM SLB: 127
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.25 hour(s)

    Close
    • 21635-01
    • International Trade Law
    • Grewal
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    International Trade Law (21635). 4 units. This course will examine the laws, policies, and multilateral institutions governing the global trade in goods and services, with a particular focus on the main multilateral trading body, the World Trade Organization (WTO). It will also consider the role of regional trade agreements, and the regulation of cross-border flows of capital, information, and investment in structuring economic globalization. Since international economic law is a rapidly evolving field with few long-standing doctrines, the historical and normative analysis of global trade will be necessarily emphasized throughout the course, and, in that vein, the class will consider the role of environmental protection, human rights, and labor regulation in international trade law and policy. Self-scheduled examination. D.S. Grewal.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Tue)
    SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20066
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

    Close
    • 21334-01
    • Issues in Criminal Justice: Inside-Out Program
    • Forman
    • Wed 9:15 AM-11:15 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • limited enrollment (12)
    • paper required
    Expand

    Issues in Criminal Justice: Inside-Out Program (21334). 4 units. Since the early 1970s, the criminal justice system in the United States has expanded dramatically. The country has adopted an array of increasingly tough approaches to crime, including aggressive street-level policing, longer sentences, and a range of collateral consequences for criminal convictions. As a result, there are currently 2.2 million persons in prisons and jails and seven million under some form of correctional supervision. The impact on African Americans has been especially profound: In many of our nation's cities, nearly one-half of young black men are in the criminal justice system.

    This seminar will focus on the tough-on-crime era’s historical roots. We will also examine the impact on these policies, especially on African-American communities.

    The assigned reading will be quite substantial (one book a week, typically 250-300 pages) and will come from a wide variety of sources, including history, sociology, political science, criminology, journalism, and law. Here are examples of books that will likely be on the reading list: Khalil Muhammad, The Condemnation of Blackness; Randall Kennedy, Race, Crime and the Law; Michael Flamm, Law and Order; James Q. Wilson, Thinking About Crime; Michael Tonry, Malign Neglect; Lisa Miller, The Perils of Federalism; Amy Lerman and Vesla Weaver, Arresting Citizenship; Victor Rios, Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys; Alice Goffman, On the Run; David Kennedy, Don’t Shoot; Jill Leovy, Ghettoside; and Bryan Stevenson, Just Mercy.

    In lieu of an examination, students will write weekly reading response papers and a final paper. Substantial Paper credit is available. Supervised Analytic Writing credit is not available. Paper required. Enrollment limited to eight. J. Forman, Jr.

    Update from Professor Forman: I am currently in conversation with the Connecticut Department of Correction regarding the possibility of teaching this course using the Inside-Out methodology, details of which can be found here. If my request is approved this will impact the course curriculum, our meeting location (we would meet inside a state prison), and the day/time that the class is offered. If you bid for this seminar, please do so understanding this uncertainty. As soon as I get confirmation from the DOC and have more details to share, I will send out an announcement.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20062

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    • 30201-01
    • †Legal Assistance: Reentry Clinic
    • Eppler-Epstein
      Shaffer
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 3:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • experiential (8)
    • not applicable
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    †Legal Assistance: Reentry Clinic (30201). 4 units, credit/fail with a graded option. The New Haven Legal Assistance Reentry Clinic is a new clinic that will provide civil legal representation to people with criminal convictions to help them challenge and navigate barriers to their successful reentry to society.

    Throughout the nation, people on all sides of the political spectrum have begun to re-examine the “tough on crime” policies of the past two decades that have led to the huge expansion of our prison population, at enormous economic, societal and personal cost. In Connecticut, Governor Malloy has championed the state as a “Second Chance Society” where people with criminal convictions receive an opportunity for a new beginning, to live positive, successful, law-abiding lives post incarceration. Yet the barriers to success continue for people who have criminal records, making it challenging for them to find employment and housing, access health and other services, and overcome the stigma attached to having criminal convictions on their record.

    Students in the Reentry Clinic will have an opportunity to represent individual clients on a variety of legal issues. Through this work, students will also identify and research challenges facing this population that invite litigation or legislative strategies for broader reforms. The clinic will accept cases referred from the Transitions Medical-Legal Partnership and existing Reentry support organizations, including Easter Seals Community Reentry Services (http://www.eastersealsgoodwill.org) , Project More (http://www.projectmore.org), Project Fresh Start (http://www.cityofnewhaven.com/mayor/prisonreentry.asp), Family Reentry (http://www.familyreentry.org), the New Haven Reentry Roundtable and other agencies working with this population.

    Examples of the direct representation cases students may work on include denials of housing subsidies based on an applicant’s criminal record, applications for pardons, employment discrimination based on the disparate impact of criminal convictions on minorities, access to health care and other public benefits and modification of child support obligations. Cases that the clinic will accept from Transitions include those in which ex-offender status both is and is not expressly at issue, because both kinds of cases reflect the immediate needs of this particular population. Students will represent clients in a variety of forums, including administrative hearings before Housing Authorities, the CHRO or EEOC, and the Department of Social Services; hearings before the Connecticut Board of Pardons and Parole; and state court.

    Students will gain experience in all aspects of lawyering, including interviewing clients and witnesses; written advocacy (examples include litigation pleadings, correspondence with clients, opposing counsel, and other third parties and letter memoranda); informal and formal fact investigation; and oral advocacy (examples include negotiations and questioning witnesses and presenting oral argument at administrative or court hearings). Students will also have an opportunity to engage in systemic reform by conducting legal and policy research to identify avenues for broader reforms. Students will be encouraged to engage in community meetings regarding reentry issues, including New Haven’s monthly Reentry Roundtable, and Fresh Start Advisory Group. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to eight. A. Eppler-Epstein and E.R. Shaffer.

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students. The two meeting times reflect two credits for the seminar component and two credits for supervision and fieldwork. Classes and supervision will be held at the New Haven Legal Assistance offices.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 23729

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    • 30222-01
    • †Litigating Civil Actions: From Filing to Finality
    • Messing
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Fri 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • exam with paper option
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    †Litigating Civil Actions: From Filing to Finality (30222). 4 units. This course will provide students with an overview of the skills that litigators need to handle a civil action in federal court from start to finish. The course will review five phases of a lawsuit. First, we will explore how to prepare a filing: for example, we will discuss how to interview clients; how to investigate a case before filing; and how to prepare a complaint. The second phase will explore pre-trial activities such as answering a complaint; motions practice; communicating with opposing counsel; document discovery and other forms of discovery (such as physical inspections); how to take and defend depositions; and how to handle expert witnesses. The course’s third phase will discuss trial skills, including how to select jurors; prepare effective opening statements; examine, cross-examine, and reexamine witnesses; deliver successful closing statements; and prepare jury instructions. We will also have brief discussions about mediation and settlement. The fourth phase of the course will explore the most famous post-trial activity: the appeal. This discussion will delve into the substance of appeals as well as the less glamorous parts of appellate practice, such as filing a notice of appeal, motions practice on appeal, and preparing a joint appendix for the appellate court. We will also have a very brief discussion of cert. petitions and Supreme Court practice. Finally, the course’s fifth phase will discuss important post-trial activities that are rarely explored within law schools, including motions for costs and enforcement of judgments. The course aspires to give students confidence that they could handle a civil action on their own. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. N. Messing.

    Course Bidding: There is no enollment limit on this course.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Thu)
    SLB - 111 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20162
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

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    • 21175-01
    • Local Government Law
    • Schleicher
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • limited enrollment (55)
    • exam required
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    Local Government Law (21175). 4 units. Much of our daily interaction with law and government is with local law and local government. Local governments are tasked with providing public goods as central to daily life as public schools and police; they pass laws and issue regulations governing everything from how loud parties can be to what one can eat; and, by setting property tax levels, regulating land uses and limiting building heights, they have an enormous impact on the value of what is for most families their largest asset, their home. Many law school classes, however, ignore local governments and local laws. This class will change that focus, examining both the law governing the powers of local governments and the actual content of local laws and policy. A special focus will be put on the regulation of politics at the local level, looking at how the rules governing local elections affect the results of those elections. Further, it will delve deeply into the determinants of the economic success of cities, using cutting edge research in agglomeration economics. And it will use those theoretical and empirical studies to address the nuts and bolts of local government law practice. Enrollment limited to fifty. Scheduled examination. D. N. Schleicher.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Wed)
    SLB - 128 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20092
    Exam: 5/03/2016 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.25 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

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    • 30173-01
    • *†Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic
    • Silk
      Metcalf
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential (18)
    • not applicable
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    *†Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30173). 4 units, credit/fail. Students will work on a variety of human rights projects, generally in support of advocacy efforts of human rights organizations. Projects are designed to give students practical experience with the range of activities in which lawyers engage to promote respect for human rights; to help students build the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective human rights lawyers; and to integrate the theory and practice of human rights. Class sessions will include an overview of basic human rights standards and their application; instruction in human rights research and writing skills; and critical examination of approaches to human rights advocacy and enforcement. The clinic will have one or more student directors. Enrollment limited to eighteen. Permission of the instructors required. J.J. Silk and H.R. Metcalf.

    Course Bidding Information: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students interested in applying for the Lowenstein Clinic should submit a resume and a short statement of interest to barbara.mianzo@yale.edu no later than 4:30 p.m. on December 10. The statement should be no longer than one single-spaced page. It should primarily explain why you are interested in participating in the Clinic and should also include a brief summary of any experiences (employment, classes, volunteer activities) that would be relevant to international human rights work. Please indicate any foreign language ability. LL.M. students are eligible for the clinic but should consult with the instructor before enrolling.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    ASH40 - A005 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 20170

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    • 21017-01
    • Property
    • Ayres
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
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    Property (21017). 4 units. The course will explore the law regulating the rights of private property broadly conceived. Our principal focus will be on entitlements in land, but we will also think about the legal entitlements to other scarce resources. Topics will include limitations on the rights of landowners to exclude others; estates in land; co-ownership; landlord-tenant law and the slum housing problem; nuisance law; easements and covenants as means of cooperation among neighbors; and eminent domain, zoning, and other tools of public land use regulation. Scheduled examination. I. Ayres.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20047
    Exam: 5/06/2016 at 9:00 AM SLB: 120
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

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    • 21595-01
    • *Public Health Law
    • Barnes
    • Thu 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 3:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
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    *Public Health Law (21595). 4 units. In the practice of public health, the patient is the population rather than the individual; and actions and policies to promote public health therefore consider the welfare of the collective, often without regard for the interests of individuals. In liberal society, public health practice therefore exists in tension with constitutional law, judicial precedent, and even our culture itself, in which the individual is most often the unit of measure and analysis and protection. In this course, we will consider the major categories of public health practice – including disease reporting and data collection, compelled treatment and vaccination, isolation and quarantine, inspection and regulation of public facilities and private homes, licensure of health professionals, regulation of hospitals and other health care facilities, regulation of food and drugs, environmental regulation, sanitation, and bioterrorism prevention -– and their sources of legal authority and legal limitations. Public health will be viewed in historical perspective, and we will particularly examine the roots of modern public health practice in the nineteenth century work of Hermann Biggs and John Snow, and will review the odd alignment of German public health practitioners with Nazi government efforts in the 1930s to control tobacco use and promote national health. Case examples will be drawn from recent public health controversies relating to the control of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, obesity, and tobacco and tobacco substitutes. We will also consider the constitutional implications of public health efforts to control or monitor speech, such as the FDA prohibitions on promotion of off-label uses of approved drugs and devices, and use of funding conditions to limit or compel speech relating to abortion, the sex industry and HIV/STD prevention. Scheduled examination. J.M. Barnes.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Thu)
    SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 20192
    Exam: 5/02/2016 - 5/16/2016
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)
    Notes: Use your exam ID.

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