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Courses: Fall 2015 Expand

    • 30129-01
    • Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Seminar
    • Wishnie
      Hallett
      Parkin
    • Wed 3:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Seminar (30129). 1 unit, graded or credit/fail at student option. A weekly seminar session only for returning students. Prerequisite: Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, N. Hallett, and J. Parkin.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10174

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    • 30125-01
    • Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Seminar
    • Wishnie
      Middleton
      Parkin
      Li
    • Mon 1:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Seminar (30125). 1 unit, graded or credit/fail at student option. A weekly seminar session only for returning students. Prerequisite: Veterans Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, B. Li, J. Parkin, and M. Middleton.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.
    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10178

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    • 20467-01
    • The Changing Health Care Industry
    • Gluck
      Ulrich
      Wulff
      Hall
    • 1
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
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    [The] Changing Health Care Industry (20467). 1 unit, credit/fail. This course will investigate the legal and policy implications of the increasing consolidation and integration of the health care industry. or example, how does the practice, payment and quality of medicine change when providers are also insurers? Or when providers are acquired by hospitals? The course is motivated by the inaugural conference of the Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School, co-sponsored by the Yale School of Management, on November 13, 2015, which will bring together health care, business and antitrust leaders across academia, government, and industry to think about these matters. No prior experience in health care or antitrust is required; the goal is for all to learn. Students will be expected to attend the conference, as well as three pre-conference seminar sessions, and one post-conference session. Students in the seminar will also be invited to all special conference events. Students wishing to receive a credit will either write a very short comment (online or in print) in conjunction with the conference, or assist with the publication of a book coming out of the conference. This course will take an interdisciplinary approach, investigating the impacts and effects from the perspective of physicians and hospitals, insurers and manufacturers, policymakers and government enforcement agencies, law and economists. Given that this topic cuts across a number of academic fields, the readings will do the same. The course is open to participation from the Law School, the School of Management, the Medical School, and the School of Public Health. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to twenty-five. Permission of the instructors required. A. Gluck.

    Note: In addition to participating in all conference sessions, students will be required to attend three pre-conference class sessions and one post-conference class session. The dates and times of the four class sessions are to be announced.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should submit a one-paragraph statement of interest and a transcript to lise.cavallaro@yale.edu by the close of the early course selection period at 4:30 pm on June 25.

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10059

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    • 20626-01
    • Decision Making Under Conditions of Uncertainty
    • Post
      Collins
      Ashton
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:50 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
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    Decision Making Under Conditions of Uncertainty (20626). 1 unit. The course will focus on government and private decision-making under conditions of high normative diversity and epistemological uncertainty. The class will focus on how policymakers should respond to the unpredictable events now overtaking Ukraine. The class will be co-taught by Dean Robert Post and Timothy Collins, and during its meetings in September and November, by the Baroness Catherine Margaret Ashton, former High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and First Vice President of the European Commission. For most meetings, the course will feature guest speakers. The economist Roger Myerson will co-teach the first class on strategic decision-making; the political scientist Graham Allison will co-teach the second class on supplementing rational actor models second class on supplementing rational actor models. We are still in the process of determining future speakers, but they will include experts on the present Ukrainian crisis. We will also likely devote a class to evaluating normative claims for secession. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fourteen Law students. Also MGT/GLBL 597a. R.C. Post, T. Collins, and C. M. Ashton.

    Note: This class will meet from 6:10 until 8:50 p.m. on the following dates: September 24 and 29, October 20 and 27, November 3, 5, and 17.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among limited enrollment bids, students submit a short statement of why they are interested in the course by June 25 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: First-day attendance is required.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10141

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    • 50110-01
    • Graduate Seminar
    • Rose-Ackerman
    • Wed 6:10 PM-7:30 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Graduate Seminar (50110). 1 unit, credit/fail. This course will offer LLM students an opportunity to explore current legal scholarship in a wide range of public and private law areas, including U.S., comparative and international law. Weekly sessions will feature Yale Law School faculty leading discussions of recent and current research. LLM students, for whom this class was designed, are strongly encouraged to participate; they receive enrollment automatically and need to notify the instructor if they choose not to enroll. S. Rose-Ackerman.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10940

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    • 20134-01
    • Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events
    • Kahn
      Silk
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events (20134). 1 unit. Conducted in workshop format and led by Professors Paul Kahn and James Silk, the course will examine contemporary issues in human rights practice and theory. Guest speakers, including scholars, advocates and journalists, will present each week on a diverse range of topics in human rights, including sessions on progressive constitutions in Latin American and on art and human rights. Readings are generally distributed in advance of each session. Students enrolled in the workshop for one unit of ungraded credit will prepare short response papers before several of the sessions and be responsible for asking the speaker a question at each of those sessions. The workshop will meet approximately every other week. P.W. Kahn and J.J. Silk.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10095

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    • 20371-01
    • Law and Macroeconomics
    • Listokin
    • Thu 3:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Law and Macroeconomics (20371). 1 to 3 units. This seminar will examine the interaction between law and macroeconomic fluctuations, with an emphasis on the “Great Recession.” Unlike conventional law and economics, the seminar assumes that aggregate demand plays an important role in determining output. Topics include regulation as a determinant of aggregate demand, the income tax code and government spending as determinants of aggregate demand, the role of corporate law during the Financial Crisis; and Central Banks’ legal authority to conduct unconventional monetary policy. Students who write papers will earn additional credit units. Enrollment limited. Y. Listokin.

    Location: ASH40 - A424 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10186

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    • 20036-01
    • Law, Economics, and Organization
    • Jolls
    • Thu 4:10 PM-5:40 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Law, Economics, and Organization (20036). 1 unit, credit/fail. This seminar will meet jointly with the Law, Economics, and Organization Workshop, an interdisciplinary faculty workshop that brings to Yale Law School scholars, generally from other universities, who present papers based on their current research. The topics will involve a broad range of issues of general legal and social science interest. Students registering for the seminar and participating in the workshop will receive 1 unit of ungraded credit per term. Neither Substantial Paper nor Supervised Analytic Writing credit will be available through the seminar. Short reaction papers will be required during the term. C. Jolls.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10065

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    • 30178-01
    • Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project
    • Gerken
      Bialek
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
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    Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (30178). 1 unit, with the option of additional units. This course will introduce students to local government lawyering. Working directly with attorneys from the Affirmative Litigation Task Force in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, students will have an opportunity to brainstorm about potential projects, research the most promising ideas for lawsuits, assist in filing a case, or help litigate one already underway. The course will address both theoretical issues (What roles should cities play in our democracy? Can cities further the public interest through litigation?) and practical ones (city-state relations, standing issues). The first part of the course will acquaint students with broader legal and policy issues associated with affirmative litigation. The students will then break into independent working groups organized by subject area; the working groups will be designed to accommodate student interests and preferences. Each working group will either develop and propose a potential lawsuit, or assist in one of the City’s ongoing affirmative litigation cases. Students joining in the fall are expected to make a one-year commitment (both fall and spring semesters). In addition, students enrolling in this course for the first time in Fall 2015 must complete their one-year commitment in the course to receive professional responsibility credit. Permission of the instructor required. H. Gerken and T. Bialek.

    Course Selection: List this clinic among the experiential course selections. If you would like to enroll, please submit one paragraph on why you are interested in local government work as well as your resume by June 25, 2015, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10155

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    • 50100-03
    • RdgGrp: Housing Policy
    • Pottenger
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14363

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    • 50100-05
    • RdgGrp: Philosophy and Law
    • Yaffe
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14365

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    • 50100-07
    • RdgGrp: Telecomm Law & Policy
    • Balkin
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14367

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    • 50100-09
    • RdgGrp: Urban Education
    • Forman
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14369

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    • 50100-01
    • RdgGrp:CntmprryIsssLglSchlrshp
    • Witt
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14361

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    • 50100-02
    • RdgGrp:CrisesAmercnCrimJustice
    • Stith
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14362

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    • 50100-10
    • RdgGrp:EmergingIssuVotingRghts
    • Gerken
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14557

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    • 50100-04
    • RdgGrp:Originalism&Application
    • Priest
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14364

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    • 50100-06
    • RdgGrp:ProgressveSchlrshpWkshp
    • Siegel
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14366

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    • 50100-08
    • RdgGrp:TribalEnvirnmntlJustice
    • Kysar
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 14368

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    • 30141-01
    • †Temporary Restraining Order Project
    • Wizner
      Frontis
      Blank
      Wenzloff
    • 1
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
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    †Temporary Restraining Order Project (30141). 1 unit, credit/fail. The Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) Project is a field placement program in which law students provide assistance to domestic violence victims applying for Temporary Restraining Orders in the Superior Court for the New Haven Judicial District, under the supervision of attorneys from the New Haven Legal Assistance Association and the Court Clerk’s Office. The TRO Project aims to increase access to justice for self-represented parties and provide opportunities for law students to learn about the law of domestic violence and court procedures for protecting individuals in abusive relationships. Students will be able to develop practical skills, including intake, interviewing, drafting of affidavits and other application documents, informing applicants about court procedures, and assisting applicants in navigating the judicial process. Open only to J.D. students. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. S. Wizner, C. Frontis, A. Wenzloff, and D. Blank.

    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10180

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    • 30177-01
    • Nonprofit Organizations Clinic
    • Simon
      Lindsay
      Davis
      Agsten
    • Fri 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 1 or 2
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Nonprofit Organizations Clinic (30177). 1 or 2 units, credit/fail. This clinical workshop will serve the needs of nonprofit organizations, nascent and established, that require help in the process of organization and incorporation, in obtaining tax exemption, and solving ongoing legal problems--organizations that cannot afford to retain private counsel. The class will meet as a group on six Fridays in each semester. *Students who take the clinic for 2 units and who attend two professional responsibility sessions will satisfy the professional responsibility requirement. †Students may satisfy the professional skills requirement through this course only if they receive 2 or more units. Also MGT 695a. J.G. Simon, M. Agsten, L.N. Davis, and B.B. Lindsay.

    Course Bidding: There is no enrollment limit for this clinic. Any students who list this clinic among their experiential course selections will be accepted if they have space on their schedules. The instructors' permission is not required.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10183

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    • 30102-01
    • Advanced Advocacy for Children and Youth
    • Peters
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Advocacy for Children and Youth (30102). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. Open only to students who have completed Advocacy for Children and Youth. Permission of the instructor required. J.K. Peters.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10164

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    • 30163-01
    • Advanced Education Adequacy Project
    • Rosen
      Knopp
      Smith
      Moodhe
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Education Adequacy Project (30163). 1 to 3 units. Open only to students who have completed Education Adequacy Project. Permission of the instructors required. D. Rosen, A. Knopp, J.P. Moodhe, and D.H. Smith.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10484

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    • 30132-01
    • Advanced Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork (30132). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail or graded at student option. Open only to students who have completed the Community and Economic Development Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. A.S. Lemar and C.F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest preference among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 15381

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    • 30104-01
    • Advanced Community and Economic Development Clinic: Seminar
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • Tue 2:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Community and Economic Development Clinic: Seminar (30104) and Fieldwork (30132). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail with a graded option. Open only to students who have completed the Community and Economic Development Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar and C. F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest preference among experiential course selections. Students who elect both the seminar and the fieldwork options should list each as their two lowest prefences.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10161

    Close
    • 30167-01
    • Advanced Ethics Bureau at Yale
    • Fox
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Ethics Bureau (30167). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail with a graded option. This course is for students who have already taken either the Ethics Bureau at Yale clinic or the instructor’s course, Traversing the Legal Minefield, and who wish to earn 1 to 3 units by contributing further to the work of the Bureau. †Students may satisfy the professional skills requirement through this course only if they receive 2 or more units. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructor required. L. Fox.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10154

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    • 30179-01
    • Advanced San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project
    • Gerken
      Bialek
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced SFALP (30179). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. Open only to those students who have completed Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project. Permission of the instructor required. H. Gerken.

    Course Selection: Continuing students should list this section as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10156

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    • 30165-01
    • Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic
    • Galperin
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic (30165). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail. Open only to students who have successfully completed the Environmental Protection Clinic. Students who complete this section for two or more units may satisfy the Professional Responsibility (*) or Legal Skills (†) requirement. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to twenty. J. Galperin.

    Course Information: Eligible students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10189

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    • 30114-01
    • Advanced Immigration Legal Services Clinic
    • Peters
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Immigration Legal Services (30114). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. Open only to students who have completed Immigration Legal Services. Permission of instructor required. J.K. Peters.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.

    Note: Due to our immediate commitments to our clients, Professor Peters will finalize the roster by email before the first class, after which the clinic cannot be dropped.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10166

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    • 30116-01
    • Advanced Landlord/Tenant Legal Services
    • Pottenger
      Dineen
    • Tue 4:10 PM-5:30 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Landlord/Tenant Legal Services (30116). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail. Only open to students who have taken Landlord/Tenant Legal Services in a previous semester. Permission of the instructors required. F.X. Dineen and J.L. Pottenger, Jr.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10492

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    • 30117-01
    • Advanced Legal Services for Immigrant Communities
    • Wizner
      Lucht
      Curtis
    • Thu 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Services for Immigrant Communities (30117). 1 to 3 units, credit/fail. Open only to students who have taken Legal Services for Immigrant Communities. Open only to J.D. students. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to four. D.E. Curtis, C.L. Lucht, and S. Wizner.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 164 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10181

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    • 30110-01
    • Advanced Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic
    • Gohara
      Shaffer
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic (30110). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option. Open only to students who have completed the Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. M. Gohara and E. Shaffer.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should use their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10314

    Close
    • 20175-01
    • Antitrust: Directed Research
    • Priest
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Antitrust: Directed Research (20175). Units to be arranged. This seminar will provide an opportunity for discussion among students interested in writing Substantial or Supervised Analytic Writing papers on current (or historical) antitrust topics. Paper required. G. L. Priest.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10117

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    • 30181-01
    • †Advanced Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic
    • Greenhouse
      Balkin
      Pincus
      Rothfeld
      Kimberly
      Hughes
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Supreme Court Advocacy (30181). 4 units (2 fall, 2 spring). Open only to students who have completed Supreme Court Advocacy. Permission of the instructors required. L. Greenhouse, A. Pincus, C. Rothfeld, P.W. Hughes, M.B. Kimberly, and J.M. Balkin.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest choice among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10158

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    • 20671-01
    • Advanced Property
    • Zhang
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Advanced Property (20671). 2 units. This course will examine the concepts of real and personal property, their social and economic construction, and their consequences for human welfare: What does it mean—philosophically, socially, and economically—to own a piece of land or personal item? How is ownership established? Who should decide how the property is used? In fact, how should it be used? The course initially approaches these questions from a theoretical perspective, discussing certain foundational texts in social and economic theory. In particular, it probes the limits of economic reasoning in understanding property institutions, and examines whether—and how—we can compensate for these limitations by introducing social, cultural and moral elements into our analysis.

    The class will then apply these general theoretical arguments to a variety of empirical settings: American land use regimes, particularly zoning ordinances and regulations; contemporary land use regulations in several foreign countries, covering Continental Europe, East Asian, and Latin America; and historical property institutions in early modern Western Europe and East Asia. By emphasizing a comparative and historical approach, the course attempts to highlight the social and cultural assumptions underlying many traditional theories of property ownership and utilization. Permission of the instructor required. T. Zhang.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10104

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    • 30107-01
    • †Advanced Criminal Justice Clinic
    • Doherty
      Ullmann
      Bruce
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Criminal Justice Clinic (30107). 2 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. F. Doherty, S.O. Bruce III, and T. Ullmann.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10152

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    • 30200-01
    • †Advanced Appellate Litigation Project
    • Duke
      Daniels
      Dooley
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Appellate Litigation Project (30200). 4 units (2 fall, 2 spring), graded or credit/fail, at student option. Students in the Appellate Litigation Project will represent pro se clients before the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Under the supervision of Yale faculty and attorneys from the appellate group at Wiggin and Dana, teams of two students will work on cases referred through the Pro Bono Counsel Plan for the Second Circuit. This program provides legal representation to pro se appellants with meritorious civil cases pending before the court. The issues raised in these cases may include immigration, employment discrimination, prisoners’ civil rights, and other section 1983 claims. The Project will focus on prisoners’ civil rights but may also include other types of cases. Students will take primary responsibility for drafting the briefs in their assigned case, and one of them will deliver oral argument before the Second Circuit. In the instructional portion of the project, students will learn principles of appellate law and practice, including concepts such as standard of review, preservation of issues, and understanding the appellate record. Students will also receive instruction in brief writing and oral advocacy. Due to the briefing and argument schedule for a civil appellate case, this is a two-term offering. This course is not open to MSL students. Enrollment will be limited to four or six students depending on case assignments. Permission of instructors required. S.B. Duke, B.Daniels, and T. Dooley.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this project among experiential course selections, students should also submit a (1) resume; (2) a writing sample (preferably a brief or legal memo), and (3) a one-page statement of interest to steven.duke@yale.edu by the close of the bidding period on June 25 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 13268

    Close
    • 20623-01
    • [The] Art of Argument: How to Write about the Law
    • Bazelon
      Caplan
    • Mon 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    [The] Art of Argument (20623). 2 units. The strong written argument is an essential aspect of effective legal advocacy. Lawyers must know how to convincingly present and marshal evidence for a client's position, in writing that is as clear and sharp as possible. Increasingly, lawyers also make use of the media to advocate for clients and causes. In the court of public opinion, it is especially important that lawyers write and speak in crisp, engaging, and persuasive terms.

    To build these skills, this class is designed to teach students how to write for a broad audience--via the op-ed page of a newspaper, a magazine, or a general-interest web site or blog, or in a book review to be published in a mainstream media outlet. The class will also discuss the ethics for lawyers of working as sources with the press, the responsibilities of lawyers to their clients in this context, and the responsibilities of journalists to their subjects and to the public. Students will learn how to use the media to educate the public and advocate for issues that are of professional interest. Multiple short writing assignments. Enrollment limited to fifteen. E. Bazelon and L. Caplan.

    Note: First-day attendance is required to hold place, including for any students on a waiting list.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10459

    Close
    • 20670-01
    • Chinese Law and Society
    • Zhang
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Chinese Law and Society (20670). 2 units. This course will survey law and legal practice in the People's Republic of China. Particular attention is given to the interaction of legal institutions with politics, social change, and economic development. Specific topics include, among others, the Party State, state capitalism, the judiciary, property law and development, business and investment law, criminal law and procedure, media (especially the Internet), and major schools of Chinese legal and political thought. Prior familiarity with Chinese history or politics is unnecessary but helpful. All course materials will be in English. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Permission of the instructor required. T. Zhang.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10103

    Close
    • 30131-01
    • †Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork (30131). 2 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. Must be taken in conjunction with the Community and Economic Development Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar and C. Muckenfuss.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10500

    Close
    • 30103-01
    • *†Community and Economic Development Clinic
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Wed 2:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Community and Economic Development Clinic (30103) and Fieldwork (30131). 2 units, credit/fail or graded at student option, for each part (4 units total). The clinic and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. CED explores the role of lawyers and the law in building wealth and opportunity in low-income communities. The clinic focuses on issues of neighborhood revitalization, social entrepreneurship, sustainable development and financial inclusion as they relate to community and economic development. Students in CED represent and partner with community organizations, nonprofits, community development financial institutions, neighborhood associations, and small foundations. These client organizations share an interest in promoting economic opportunity and socioeconomic mobility among low- and moderate-income people.

    Students will represent clients in a range of legal matters including formation and governance of for-profit, not-for-profit and hybrid entities, negotiating and drafting contracts, developing employment and other policies, structuring real estate transactions, resolving zoning and environmental issues, providing tax advice, drafting and advocating for legislation and appearing before administrative agencies. CED engages students in local work which can then be used to inform policy development at the local, state and federal levels. Students will gain skills in client contact, contract drafting, transactional lawyering, legal research and writing, regulatory and legislative advocacy, administrative agency contact and negotiation. The class seminar will meet once a week for two hours and once a week for one hour and will cover federal, state and local policies affecting urban and suburban places; substantive law in tax, real estate development, and corporate governance; and transactional and regulatory lawyering skills, such as negotiating and drafting contracts. Each student will meet with faculty once a week for fieldwork supervision. The clinic is open to students from the Schools of Law, Management, Divinity, Forestry & Environmental Studies, Public Health, and Architecture with prior approval from a faculty member. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar and C.F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should submit a short statement of interest by 4:30 p.m. on June 25, 2015.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10160

    Close
    • 20121-01
    • Comparative Constitutional Law: Seminar
    • Amar
      Calabresi
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Comparative Constitutional Law: Seminar (20121). 2 units. This seminar will provide a comparative perspective on American constitutional law by looking at analogous case law and institutions from other constitutional democracies including the U.K., Germany, France, Japan, India, Canada, South Africa, Australia, Indonesia, South Korea, Brazil, Italy, Israel, and the European Union. Topics will include amendment mechanisms, secession, judicial review, separation of powers, federalism, fundamental rights, equality, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, comparative procedure, property rights and economic liberties, entitlements to government aid, and guarantees of democracy. The course requirements are a ten-page take-home exam essay and a twenty-five page paper. Permission of the instructors required. Self-scheduled examination and paper required. A. R. Amar and S. G. Calabresi.

    Note: Students who are interested in this seminar only need to list this course among permission-of-instructor selections; there is no need otherwise to apply in advance but all interested students should plan to attend the first class meeting. The instructors will then decide who has permission to enroll.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10455
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20542-01
    • Comparing U.S. and European Constitutionalism
    • Grimm
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Comparing U.S. and European Constitutionalism (20542). 2 units. Modern constitutionalism was invented in the United States, but soon adopted in many European countries. Both constitutional systems undoubtedly belong to the type of liberal democracies. But there are also striking differences, for instance in the historical origin that continues to exercise its influence until today, in the understanding of fundamental rights, the separation of powers, the function and acceptance of judicial review, constitutional amendments, the attitude toward international law etc. Knowledge of these differences sharpens the understanding of one's own constitutional system, makes the deeper roots behind the differences visible, and furnishes alternatives that may be useful when it comes to interpret constitutions and solve constitutional conflicts. At the end the question will be asked whether or not the constitutionalization process in the EU follows the American model of 1787. This course will meet for the first half of the semester, between September 2 and October 7. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. D. Grimm

    Location: SLB - 108 (Thu)
    SLB - 108 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10061
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20442-01
    • Constitutional Interpretation
    • Amar
      Bobbitt
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Constitutional Interpretation (20442). 2 units. An advanced constitutional law course, open only to students who have already taken an introductory course in American Constitutional Law at Yale or elsewhere. This course will revolve around the text of the United States Constitution and four books authored by the instructors: P. Bobbitt, Constitutional Fate (1982); A. Amar, America's Constitution: A Biography (2005); P. Bobbitt, Constitutional Interpretation (1991); and A. Amar, America's Unwritten Constitution (2012). Self-scheduled examination or paper option. A.R. Amar and P. Bobbitt.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 13330
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20259-01
    • †Constitutional Litigation Seminar
    • Meyer
      Walker
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    †Constitutional Litigation Seminar (20259). 2 units. Federal constitutional adjudication from the vantage of the litigator with an emphasis on Circuit and Supreme Court practice and procedural problems, including jurisdiction, justiciability, exhaustion of remedies, immunities, abstention, and comity. Specific substantive questions of constitutional law currently before the Supreme Court are considered as well. Students will each argue two cases taken from the Supreme Court docket and will write one brief, which may be from that docket, but will likely come from a circuit court decision. Students will also join the faculty members on the bench and will, from time to time, be asked to make brief arguments on very short notice on issues raised in the class. Enrollment limited to twelve. J.A. Meyer and J.M. Walker, Jr.

    Course Bidding: Students who have been accepted will be asked to confirm their commitment to the course before the beginning of the term. Attendance at all class meetings, including the first, is required. No drops will be approved after the first class meeting, so any accepted students who decide not to take the class must so inform the instructors before the end of the first class meeting. Waitlisted students who continue to be interested should attend the first class meeting.

    Note: The first class meeting will be on Wednesday, September 9, at the Law School. Thereafter, the class will meet at 157 Church Street on the following dates: September 9,16, 24, 30; October 1, 7, 8, 28, 29; November 4, 5, 11, 12, 18. All class meetings begin at 4:10 p.m. The break in the middle of the course is designed to give students a time to write the brief.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10798

    Close
    • 30215-01
    • †Corporate Crisis Management
    • Trevino
      Coleman
      Wiseman
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Corporate Crisis Management (30215). 2 units, credit/fail. As a result of unplanned for (or badly planned for) negative events, companies increasingly find themselves as targets of aggressive legal action, media coverage and regulatory pressure. This is particularly the case for large or name-brand companies. Recent examples include the GM and Toyota recalls, the data breaches at Sony Pictures Entertainment, Target and Home Depot and JPMorgan’s London Whale. The scale can range from an existential threat, such as BP’s oil spill, to a more minor reputational crisis, such as Lululemon’s recall.

    One of the key challenges presented by these developments is that they do not arise from the usual interactions that characterize “normal” business. Instead, companies must organize and act across traditional hierarchies and areas of expertise and many times face antagonistic, unexpected tactics designed for maximal visibility and shock effect, potentially to force industry-wide change. In advising clients in these situations, lawyers must coordinate business concerns, legal issues, stakeholder concerns and regulatory matters, as well as plan for both expected and unexpected outcomes.

    This class is based on experiential learning: a rich set of case studies and crisis simulation exercises balance the theoretical and legal frameworks and will help participants to improve their strategic thinking as well as team management and communication skills in high-stress situations. Enrollment limited to sixteen. Permission of the instructors required. H. Coleman, M. Trevino, and M. Wiseman.

    Note: No drops will be permitted after the first class.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10488

    Close
    • 30105-01
    • *†Criminal Justice Clinic: Seminar
    • Doherty
      Ullmann
      Bruce
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Criminal Justice Clinic (30105) and Fieldwork (30106). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option, for each part (4 units total). The clinic and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. Students represent defendants in criminal cases in the Geographical Area #23 courthouse (the "GA") on Elm Street in New Haven. Students handle all aspects of their clients' cases under the direct supervision of clinical faculty. Students learn how to build relationships with clients, investigate and develop their cases, construct persuasive case theories, negotiate with opposing counsel, prepare motions and briefs, and advocate for clients in court. Students also explore the legal framework governing the representation of clients in criminal cases, including the rules of professional responsibility. Throughout, students are encouraged to think critically about the operation of the criminal justice system and to reflect on opportunities for reform. Because of the frequency of court appearances, students must keep two mornings a week (Monday--Friday, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.) free from other obligations. Students must also return to the Law School in time to participate in an August 27 and 28, 2015, orientation program intended to prepare them for criminal practice. Enrollment limited. F. Doherty, S.O. Bruce III, and T. Ullmann.

    Course Bidding: In addition to selecting this course among the experiential course listings, you should upload to the bidding system a statement of interest and CV by the close of early registration on June 25, 2015 at 4:30 p.m. Applying to this clinic constitutes permission for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of your Law transcript to the instructors.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10150

    Close
    • 30106-01
    • †Criminal Justice Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Doherty
      Ullmann
      Bruce
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Criminal Justice Clinic: Fieldwork (30106). 2 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. Students must be enrolled simultaneously in the seminar and fieldwork sections of this clinic. F.M. Doherty, S.O. Bruce III, and T. Ullmann.

    Course Bidding: Students who bid on the seminar section of this clinic and who are accepted will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing tudent, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10151

    Close
    • 20263-01
    • Critical Legal Theory
    • Balkin
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Critical Legal Theory (20263). 2 units. Critical movements in American legal scholarship emerged between 1975 and 1990. These movements debated the value of rights discourse and studied how legal argument and legal culture either obscured or apologized for continuing injustices in American society. In this course, we will revisit some of the scholarly work published during this period and consider whether it has relevance for today's world. We will also read selected contemporary work in order to ask what a critical approach to law would look like in the twenty-first century. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. J. M. Balkin.

    Location: ASH40 - A420 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10042
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Notes: Duration: Entire exam period.

    Close
    • 20620-01
    • Decarbonizing the U.S. Power Sector: Driving U.S. Climate Policy under the Clean Air Act
    • Sussman
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Decarbonizing the U.S. Power Sector: Driving U.S. Climate Policy under the Clean Air Act (20620). 2 units. The Obama Administration's Clean Power Plan (CPP) is the centerpiece of its efforts to drive down power plant emissions of greenhouse gases linked to climate change. Since the final CPP will be released in the summer of 2015, this seminar will be well-timed to tap into the enormous interest and debate that the CPP has engendered. It will unfold against the backdrop of intensive efforts by policymakers, lawyers, and experts to understand the final rule and its implications, evaluate legal and political options, and begin implementation. Applying a multi-disciplinary perspective, the seminar will examine the interplay between the legal, economic, and political dimensions of the CPP. Key areas of focus will be: how the CPP relates to the larger context of climate science; the relationship between the CPP and historical efforts to address climate change; the strengths and limitations of the Obama Administration's aggressive reliance on the Clean Air Act; the effectiveness of different emission reduction tools; key criticisms of the CPP proposal and how the final rule addresses them; the energy policy and regulatory choices states must make during implementation; and the timing and likely outcome of legal challenges. The goal is to give students an understanding of the CPP's role in climate science and policy and a nuts-and-bolts immersion in the practical realities of implementing a complex regulatory framework. Paper required. Enrollment capped at nine Law students. Paper required. Enrollment capped at 9 Law students. Also MGT/F&ES. R. Sussman.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10491

    Close
    • 20666-01
    • †Dialogue Between the Highest Courts: Co-operation, Co-Habitation, or Conflict?
    • Garlicki
    • Wed 3:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    †Dialogue Between the Highest Courts: Co-operation, Co-Habitation or Conflict? (20666). 2 units. One of the emerging trends in the modern countries is the development of so-called multi-dimensional protection of individual rights. In consequence, questions concerning protection of those rights may be parallely addressed under different norms of reference (like: national constitutions as well as international and supranational instruments) and adjudicated before different (national, international and supranational) judicial bodies.

    While potentially beneficial for protection of rights, multi-national dimensional protection may result in jurisdictional overlaps. In the national-level perspective, there may be an endemic competition between a supreme court and a constitutional court. In the international-level perspective, there may be no clear borders between jurisdiction of different courts, as is the case with the two European highest courts: the European Court of Human Rights and the Court of Justice of the European Union. And, finally, in the cross-level perspective, national and international courts may be called to decide on the same matter. It generates a considerable potential for conflict as it is in the nature of every highest court that it may not be willing to accept limitations to its jurisdictional supremacy.

    This seminar will identify and review several examples of dialogue between the highest courts. The class will mostly focus on different European systems and will devote particular attention to cases concerning individual rights and liberties. We will see that, in the realities of judicial dialogue, different courts arrive at different solutions and –- while quite often there is a common will to cooperate -- some courts could hardly resist the temptation to enter into an open conflict.

    In brief, this seminar will serve as an introductory guide into the complicated system of constitutional and international jurisdictions in the modern world. Enrollment capped at seventeen. Paper required. L. Garlicki.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10057

    Close
    • 20500-01
    • Human Dignity: Research Seminar
    • Barak
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Human Dignity: Research Seminar (20500). 2 units. Human dignity has been a part of Western society for over 2500 years and was formed as a theological and philosophical concept. In the wake of the Second World War, and following the atrocities committed by the Nazis and the Holocaust of the Jewish people, human dignity became an important concept in international law, constitutional law, and legal theory. This research seminar will focus on understanding the legal concept of human dignity. It shall focus on issues such as the importance of the intellectual history of human dignity to the modern legal concept; the relationship between the religious meaning of human dignity and the legal meaning; the contributions of Kant, Dworkin, and Waldron to the understanding of human dignity as a modern legal concept; what is human dignity as a constitutional value; the relationship between the right to human dignity and other human rights; what does human dignity as a value or a right contribute to legal issues such as discrimination, the death penalty, abortions, and bio-ethics (cloning, stem cells research, genetic engineering); is there a difference between constitutions that expressly recognize human dignity and those that recognize it through implication; the role that human dignity plays in the American Bill of Rights; and the role of comparative law in understanding human dignity. Students will meet individually with the professor during the term to discuss their paper. Hours to be arranged. Paper required. A. Barak.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10040

    Close
    • 20643-01
    • International Arbitration: Seminar
    • Stone Sweet
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    International Arbitration: Seminar (20643). 2 units. This research-oriented seminar will focus on both international commercial and investor-state arbitration. In recent decades, the importance of both has exploded into prominence, prompting a wave of new scholarship. Students will read and discuss the most important recent research in the field in view of developing research projects of their own. Student collaboration on a project is encouraged. A paper or literature review is required. A. Stone Sweet.

    Note: Students should attend the first session of the seminar to assure enrollment.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10097

    Close
    • 20396-01
    • International Investment Law
    • Reisman
      Aguilar Alvarez Colunga
    • Mon 9:10 AM-11:00 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    International Investment Law (20396). 2 units. As foreign direct investment has increased as a function of globalization, so have disputes about it. This seminar will examine the treaties (and their negotiation) concluded to encourage and regulate foreign investment, the international law and procedure applied in the third-party resolution of international investment disputes, and the critical policy issues that must now be addressed. Papers may qualify for Substantial Paper or Supervised Analytic Writing credit. Enrollment will be capped at twenty-five. Scheduled examination or paper option. W.M. Reisman and G. Aguilar-Alvarez.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10112
    Exam: 12/17/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 8 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20279-01
    • Jurisprudence
    • Reisman
      Richardson
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Jurisprudence (20279). 2 units. This is a reading group on legal theories, including naked power, natural law, positivism, sociological jurisprudence, American Legal Realism and Policy Sciences. Readings will be examined both on their own terms and from the perspective of the New Haven School. We will meet as a group nine times over the course of the semester as well as one-on-one with the instructor. Paper required and may be acceptable for Substantial Paper or Supervised Analytic Writing credit. W.M. Reisman.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10113

    Close
    • 20029-01
    • Just Causes of War: Evidence from War Manifestos
    • Hathaway
    • Wed 9:10 AM-10:00 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Just Causes of War: Evidence from War Manifestos (20029). 2 units. Permission of the instructors required. O. Hathaway.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 14850

    Close
    • 20227-01
    • Law and Cognition: Seminar
    • Kahan
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Law and Cognition: Seminar (20227). 2 units. The goal of this seminar will be to deepen participants' understanding of how legal decisionmakers--particularly judges and juries--think. We will compile an in-depth catalog of empirically grounded frameworks, including ones founded in behavioral economics, social psychology, and political science; relate these to historical and contemporary jurisprudential perspectives, such as "formalism," "legal realism," and the "legal process school"; and develop critical understandings of the logic and presuppositions of pertinent forms of proof--controlled experiments, observational studies, and neuroscience imaging, among others. Students will write short response papers on weekly readings. Enrollment capped at twenty-five. D.M. Kahan.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10115

    Close
    • 30172-01
    • †Liman Project: Incarceration and Reform
    • Resnik
      Kalb
      Baumgartel
      Fernandez
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Liman Project: Incarceration and Reform (30172). 2 units, credit/fail with a graded option. This project will enable students to learn about the law of and to work on understanding facets of incarceration. One ongoing project involves studying how prisons use and regulate long-term isolation (sometimes called “solitary confinement,” or “restricted housing” or “administrative segregation”) and working on how to reduce the numbers of persons in isolation and the degrees of isolation for those in such placements. A national survey is underway, and additional data collection and analyses will be done, along with more research on the law and policies related to isolation. Another project focuses on the role gender plays in incarceration, in terms of the ways in which women and men are classified, placed in facilities, and the programs and rules imposed. Again, the goals include research and reform. Students work in teams and meet regularly with supervisors. With permission, students may elect to write a related Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper for additional graded credit. The projects usually span more than one semester and have, on occasion, resulted in published articles. Permission of the instructors required. J. Resnik, J. Kalb, S. Baumgartel, and L. Fernandez.

    Course Bidding: Students should provide a brief statement of interest and a C.V. by June 25,2015, at 4:30 p.m. The instructors will only consider the statement of interest, not the weighted preference, in determing who is accepted, so students should list this course as their lowest preference among experiential course selections.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10159

    Close
    • 20249-01
    • Privacy at 50: Sex, Family, and the Constitution
    • Siegel
      Greenhouse
      Chauncey
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • exam required
    Expand

    Privacy at 50: Sex, the Family and the Constitution (20249). 2 units. The year 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of Griswold v. Connecticut, the Supreme Court decision that established the constitutional right of married couples to use contraception. Beginning with mid-twentieth century debates about the role of the criminal law in regulating sex, this course will examine the roots of Griswold, and identify competing understandings of privacy, equality, and dignity in debates over abortion, LGBT rights, same-sex marriage and emerging issues concerning reproduction and parenting today. In reading cases and legislation, we will draw on primary sources and recent scholarship to consider how social mobilization and counter-mobilization have shaped and limited constitutional law governing the regulation of sex and family. What might privacy's past teach us about its future? And what might we learn from the evolution of these cases about the relationship between law and social movements? No preference given to students in their final year of law school. Enrollment limited to thirty. Self-scheduled examination. R. Siegel, L. Greenhouse, and G. Chauncey.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor preferences, students should write a paragraph noting any relevant background (e.g. academic work before or in law school; extracurricular activities; employment) they would bring to the course. Statements should be submitted by June 25, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10060
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Notes: Duration: Entire exam period.

    Close
    • 20535-01
    • Proportionality in Constitutional Law
    • Barak
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Proportionality in Constitutional Law (20535). 2 units. In many countries (e.g., Canada, Germany, Spain, Brazil, Israel), and under some International documents (e.g., the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms), the regular legislature can take action affecting constitutional rights that are part of the Bill of Rights, so long as such effect is proportional (that is, suitable and necessary to achieve legitimate government ends and properly balanced). This seminar will look into the concept of proportionality, its scope and its rationales. We shall do so on a comparative law basis. We shall compare it with U.S. jurisprudence, while trying to see whether constitutional rights are better protected by the U.S. method of categorization or by a proportionality analysis. We shall follow the development of proportionality in recent U.S. Constitutional Law and evaluate its place in the constitutional scheme of things. This course will meet during the first half of the term. Paper required. A. Barak.

    Course Selection Information: Students should submit statements of interest by June 25, 2015, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Wed)
    SLB - 113 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10041

    Close
    • 20621-01
    • †Reading Cases in Corporate Law
    • Deutsch
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    †Reading Cases in Corporate Law (20261). 2 units. This course will examine the extent to which judicial opinions -- the units tht create the structure of the common law or the authoritative interpretations of the directives issued by administative agencies -- effectively limit the activities of economic actors. Prerequisite: Basic corporate law. Knowledge of securities law would be helpful but is not required. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. J.G. Deutsch.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10046
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20572-01
    • Religion and the Constitution(s)
    • Weil
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Religion and the Constitution(s) (20572). 2 units. Modernity and liberal democracy are consonant with religious liberty, freedom of conscience, free speech, and different degrees of separation between religion and politics. But the way these principles are organized and interpreted varies across and within different national constitutional and legal regimes. Most recently, religious revivals and the development of religious diversity have challenged old historical arrangements. This course will examine the legal and constitutional status of religion in different national contexts (such as in the US, Canada, Europe, Asia, and Latin America) as well as the places, discourses and topoi in which these new challenges occur (the public sphere, schools or universities, corporations, the army; prayers, religious symbols, creationism, state subsidies, etc.). The course will particularly address the jurisdictional answers offered in response to these issues, by the U. S. Supreme Court. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. P. Weil.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10182

    Close
    • 20568-01
    • Sexuality, Gender, Health, and Human Rights
    • Miller
    • Thu 9:25 AM-11:15 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Sexuality, Gender, Health, and Human Rights (20568). 2 units. This course will explore the application of human rights perspectives and practices to issues in regard to sexuality and health. Through reading, interactive discussion, paper presentation, and occasional outside speakers, students will learn the tools and implications of applying rights and law to a range of sexuality and health-related topics. The overal goal is twofold: to engage students in the world of global sexual health and rights policy making as a field of social justice and public health action; and to introduce them to conceptual tools that can inform advocacy and policy formation and evaluation. Class participation, a book review, an OpEd, and a final paper required. This course will follow the calendar of the Graduate School. Enrollment limited. Also GLBL 529a/CDE 585a. A.M. Miller.

    Location: WLH - 001 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10420

    Close
    • 30217-01
    • †Start-Ups and the Law
    • Breeze
      Goldberg
      Lynch
    • Fri 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Start-Ups and the Law (30217). 2 units, credit/fail. This course is intended to give students a thorough look at legal issues faced by start-up companies. We will follow a semi-hypothetical company throughout its lifecycle, with the students creating its capitalization table and updating it through several rounds of financing and an acquisition. We will focus on corporate matters and have several sessions on related matters including intellectual property and executive compensation. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. W. Breeze, D.A. Goldberg, and C.L. Lynch.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should submit a short statement of interest by June 25, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10485

    Close
    • 20248-01
    • Theories of Distributive Justice
    • Roemer
    • Wed 8:30 AM-10:20 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Theories of Distributive Justice (20248). 2 units. The first four weeks of this seminar focus upon Thomas Piketty's Capital in the Twenty-First Century (Harvard Univ. Press, 2014), the most important book on income distribution in some years. The course will then follow the debate on egalitarianism that has taken place since John Rawls (1971) in political philosophy. Philosophical readings will be critiqued from the philosophical and economic viewpoints. Authors discussed will be Rawls and John Harsanyi on the veil of ignorance as a thought experiment; neo-Lockeanism according to Robert Nozick; resource egalitarianism according to Ronald Dworkin; and equality of opportunity according to Richard Arneson, G.A. Cohen, and John Roemer. Economics background at the level of intermediate micro-economics is required; experience shows that students lacking this background do not follow the lectures. An appropriate prerequisite is intermediate microeconomics or PLSC 517. There will be a number of problem sets in the style of economics and three short essays in the style of analytical philosophy. Permission of the instructor required if there is an ambiguity concerning the economic prerequisite. Also PLSC 595a/ECON 791a. J. Roemer.

    Note: This course will meet according to the calendar of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. The seminar will now meet on Wednesdays, 8:30 until 10:20 a.m. The first class meeting will be on Wednesday, September 9.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest, including their preparation in economics, by June 25 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: RKZ - 102 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10507

    Close
    • 20636-01
    • Thought in Law and Economics: Seminar
    • Brooks
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Thought in Law and Economics (20636). 2 units. Over the past half-century, economic analytic perspectives of law have thrived in the legal academy. This course provides a survey and critical review of the intellectual legacy and methodological approaches common to the study of law and economics. Students are introduced to the subject by reading original manuscripts. The course, however, aims at more than a history of thought in law and economics. Through models and problem sets, students will also develop familiarity with the principal conceptual approaches and tools of the field, from marginal analysis to cooperative and non-cooperative game theory.

    Each session will be structured around a primary foundational publication in law and economics. In the first hour of each class we will carefully work through the publication’s model in a rigorous but broadly accessible manner (if there is no model in the publication, we will develop one so as to focus our analysis). A discussion will follow in the second hour, when the class turns its attention to related articles, extensions and critiques of the foundational piece. The seminar is divided into three parts. The first part covers basic analytical preliminaries and formulations, including the unit of analysis, the economic analysis of entitlement and the Coase Theorem. The second part of the seminar delves into specific subject matter contributions in law and economics, including contracts, criminal law, torts, procedure, property and constitutional/public law. The final part will turn to work based on norms and game theoretic approaches in law and economics. R.R.W. Brooks.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10058
    Exam: 12/14/2015
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20339-01
    • Topics in Law and Psychology
    • Tyler
      Johnson
    • Tue 4:00 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Topics in Law and Psychology (20339). 2 units. The goal of this seminar is to strengthen the collaborative bridge between law and psychology by focusing on the work of faculty in both departments who do research connecting psychological knowledge to legal questions. Students will write a paper on an aspect of these interdisciplinary fields that interests them. The class will be built around reading material from faculty and when possible bringing them into the class to talk about their work and answer questions about their views on the field. We will also bring in researchers from other universities who are doing relevant research. Paper required. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. Also PSYC 626a. M. Johnson and T.R. Tyler.

    Note: The first class meeting will be on Tuesday, September 8.

    Location: SSS - (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10419

    Close
    • 30123-01
    • *†Veterans Legal Services Clinic
    • Wishnie
      Middleton
      Parkin
      Li
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Veterans Legal Services Clinic (30123) and Fieldwork (30124). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). The clinic and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. There are approximately 250,000 veterans currently residing in Connecticut, many with acute and unique legal needs related to their military service or return to civilian life. In this clinic, students represent Connecticut veterans in a range of individual litigation and institutional advocacy matters. Pending individual matters include (1) benefits applications for veterans who have suffered PTSD, sexual assault, and other injuries, in the first instance, on administrative appeal, and on judicial review of administrative denials; and (2) discharge upgrade applications, on administrative appeal and in U.S. District Court. Students also represent local and national veterans organizations in Freedom of Information Act litigation in U.S. District Court; civil rights litigation arising from sexual assault, and other-than-honorable discharges of service members suffering undiagnosed PTSD; and federal and state regulatory and legislative advocacy concerning veterans' employment issues, criminal justice matters, treatment of service members with PTSD and military sexual assault and rape. The seminar portion is a practice-oriented examination of advocacy on behalf of veterans and of social justice lawyering generally. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, B. Li, J. Parkin, and M. Middleton.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among your experiential course selections, you must also submit a statement of interest in the clinic and a copy of your resume by the close of early registration on June 25, at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10176

    Close
    • 30124-01
    • †Veterans Legal Services Fieldwork
    • Wishnie
      Middleton
      Parkin
      Li
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Veteran Legal Services Fieldwork (30124). 2 units. Must be taken in conjunction with the Veteran Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, B. Li, J. Parkin, and M. Middleton.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in both the seminar and the fieldwork sections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10177

    Close
    • 30127-01
    • *†Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic
    • Wishnie
      Hallett
      Parkin
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic (30127) and Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). Students will represent immigrants and low-wage workers in Connecticut in labor, immigration, and other civil rights areas, through litigation for individuals and non-litigation advocacy for community-based organizations. In litigation matters, students will handle cases at all stages of legal proceedings in Immigration Court, Board of Immigration Appeals, U.S. District Court, the Second Circuit, and state courts. The non-litigation work will include representation of grassroots organizations, labor and faith organizations in regulatory and legislative reform efforts, media advocacy, strategic planning, and other matters. The seminar portion is a practice-oriented examination of advocacy on behalf of workers and non-citizens and of social justice lawyering generally. The course will be a two-term offering (4 units each term). The clinical course and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously in both terms. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. M. Wishnie, N. Hallett, and J. Parkin.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing the clinic experiential permission courses, interested students should submit a resume and a statement of interest by June 25, 2015, at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Students admitted to WIRAC must confirm their participation in advance of the first class by a date designated by the instructors.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10172

    Close
    • 30128-01
    • †Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy: Fieldwork
    • Wishnie
      Hallett
      Parkin
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. The clinical course and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously in both terms. M. Wishnie, N. Hallett, and J. Parkin.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in both the seminar and the fieldwork sections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the follow non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10173

    Close
    • 20236-01
    • Working with Intellectual Property: Patents and Trade Secrets
    • Cundiff
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Working with Intellectual Property: Patents and Trade Secrets (20236). 2 units. This course will examine current issues in intellectual property by focusing on the activities of lawyers who litigate and advise on patent and other intellectual property cases. Casebooks present, debate and evaluate the conclusions courts have reached in significant cases. This course will discuss how lawyers develop the evidence and arguments that lead decision makers to reach their conclusions and will examine working arrangements and disputes that frequently do not make their way into court at all. The course will examine documents such as various kinds of licensing agreements, deposition transcripts, expert reports, briefs, and other "building blocks" underlying reported decisions, as well as applicable statutory and case law authority. Guest lecturers who have had significant influence in shaping intellectual property law will participate in a number of our classes; past visitors have included lawyers who have argued leading cases, a Judge from the Federal Circuit, an author of leading intellectual property treatises, and lawyers representing major industry and policy organizations in the intellectual property arena. Instead of an exam, students will prepare and present reaction papers and problem-solving documents (e.g., protest letters, argument/negotiation outlines, proposed orders for relief, and settlement proposals) throughout the semester individually and as part of a group. Prior experience in intellectual property law is helpful but not required. This course is not a survey of intellectual property law issues. It complements other intellectual property courses offered by the School. Instructor will be able to accept a limited number of papers in satisfaction of the Substantial Paper requirement. Permission of the instructor required. V.A. Cundiff.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among your permission-of-the-instructor selections, please submit a brief statement of interest describing any experience you may have had with intellectual property law and a description of the legal writing you have done or are planning to pursue by 4:30 p.m. on June 25. this information will be used to tailor the course to the participants.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10044

    Close
    • 20526-01
    • Advanced Environmental Law: Chemical Controls
    • Elliott
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Advanced Environmental Law: Chemical Controls (20526). 2 or 3 units. This advanced environmental law course will build upon the survey course in environmental law and policy (which is not required but is useful) and will apply the concepts discussed in the survey course to the issue of regulating chemicals. The basic objective is to acquaint students with the similarities and differences among the U.S., EU, and Chinese approaches to regulating chemicals, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. We will begin with an examination of the basic paradigms of Quantitative Risk Assessment in the United States and the Precautionary Principle in the European Union. We will use a set of reading materials and articles which includes portions of the U.S. Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), proposed amendments to reform TSCA, the EU regulation on the Registration, Evaluation and Authorization of Chemicals (REACH), China REACH, and the EPA, FDA, and USDA approaches relating to biotechnology, the EU Labeling and Traceability Law, the U.S. coordinated effort on nanotechnology and the EU White Paper Towards a European Strategy for Nanotechnology. The prospects for greater international harmonization in the regulation of chemicals will also be considered. Students will conduct and report on their research on topics related to the course. The emphasis will be on what the United States, the European Union, and China can learn from one another to improve their regulatory systems. Enrollment limited to twenty-five. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. E.D. Elliott.

    Note: Class participation will count toward the final grade. No more than three classes may be missed.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10051
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30171-01
    • Advanced Global Refugee Legal Assistance
    • Heller
      Reisner
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Global Refugee Legal Assistance (30171). 2 or 3 units. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Global Refugee Legal Assistance. Permission of the instructors required. R. Heller and K.A. Reisner.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 13404

    Close
    • 20601-01
    • Art and Cultural Property Law
    • Whitman
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Art and Cultural Property Law (20601). 2 or 3 units. Topics in the law of artist's rights, art markets, and cultural property. The course will include such topics as moral rights, the right of publicity, law relevant to art galleries and dealers, auctions and museums, as well as problems in the protection of cultural property. Paper required. Enrollment limited to sixteen. J.Q. Whitman.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10102

    Close
    • 20571-01
    • Bioethics and Law
    • Latham
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Bioethics and Law (20571). 2 or 3 units. Participants in this seminar will discuss the regulation by the federal government and, more importantly, by the states, of a number of current issues in biomedical ethics. Topics to be discussed include end-or-life care and aid-in-dying; abortion, assisted reproduction and related family-law issues; experimentation on human subjects and on human tissues; organ recruitment, donation and transplantation; and issues relating to informed consent and privacy. We will take brief comparative looks at other countries' regulations in some areas. Students will earn 2 units for a twenty-page paper, 3 units for a longer paper. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twenty. S. Latham.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10120

    Close
    • 20517-01
    • Comparative Administrative Law
    • Rose-Ackerman
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Comparative Administrative Law (20517). 2 or 3 units. A seminar comparing the administrative law system of the United States with those in other parts of the world. The seminar will focus on the way statutory and constitutional law guides and constrains policymaking by government ministries and independent agencies, and it will consider the oversight role of the courts and other bodies. The course will compare the U.S. with the EU, France, Germany, and the U.K., and it will also examine administrative law in the transition to democracy in emerging economies and in non-democracies such as China. The particular comparative focus will depend on student background and interest. Prerequisite: One course on administrative law (either of the United States or of any other country.) Thus, LL.M. students are eligible if they have studied administrative law during their legal training. Bi-weekly reading responses and either a self-scheduled examination or a term paper. Three units of credit available for papers designed to earn Substantial Paper credit or for comparable papers by graduate students. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Enrollment limited to fifteen. S. Rose-Ackerman.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10092

    Close
    • 20044-01
    • Convicting the Innocent
    • Duke
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Convicting the Innocent (20044). 2 or 3 units. This course will explore the causes of and remedies for miscarriages of justice in which persons other than the perpetrators of criminal offenses are found guilty. The course will examine the processes of memory and suggestion, cognition, belief formation and resistance to change, lying and lie detection, the motivations and opportunities for fabricating evidence, imposter and unqualified experts, incompetent lawyers, poverty, and their relationships to legal rules and practices. Among the specific contexts in which the examinations will occur are allegations of child sexual abuse, stranger rapes, robberies, and murders. Some attention will be paid to the special problem of capital punishment. Students will probably be asked to present a topic during the term and to ask a question or make a comment during every class meeting. Attendance and participation is therefore required. Students who have selected writing topics and have had those topics approved by November 30th may receive writing credit in lieu of the examination. Others will take an open-book examination, for which they will receive 2 units of credit. The credits awarded for papers will depend on the work involved in the paper. Papers may qualify for Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit. Enrollment limited to twelve. Scheduled examination or paper option. S.B. Duke.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10116
    Exam: 12/16/2015 at 2:00 PM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 2 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20538-01
    • Democracy and Distribution
    • Graetz
      Shapiro
    • Mon 1:30 PM-3:20 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Democracy and Distribution (20538). 2 units.The attention showered in 2015 on Thomas Piketty’s book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, brought issues of inequality in the distribution of income and wealth to the forefront of public and scholarly attention. An enormous body of research has been produced over the past two decades to understand the nature of the dramatic rise in inequality, especially in the United States, and its causes. A long list of proposals for legal change has emerged in response to the outpouring of data and analysis. This course will explore the facts and the causes of and political barriers to potential responses to these recent developments, principally but not exclusively in the United States. Ultimately, the question requires an examination of the relations between democracy and the distribution of income and wealth. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which different groups, classes, and coalitions affect, and are affected by, democratic distributive politics. Attention will be paid to theories of distribution, politics of distribution, distributive instruments, and the implementation of policies affecting distribution. Substantive topics covered will include, for example, regulation, protectionism, taxes, social insurance, welfare, public opinion, education, and unions. This course will meet according to the Yale College calendar. Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit possible, with permission of the instructor. Paper required. Enrollment limited to ten law students. Also PLSC 287a/EPE 411a. M.J. Graetz and I. Shapiro.

    Location: WLH - 202 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10142

    Close
    • 20269-01
    • International Criminal Law
    • Damaska
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    International Criminal Law (20269). 2 or 3 units. After a brief survey of the history of international criminal law and the development of international criminal courts, the seminar will examine the problem of sources and goals of international criminal justice. Alternative responses to mass atrocities will be explored. Genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression will then be examined in some detail. Next, the attention of the seminar will focus on the departures of international criminal procedure and evidence from forms of justice prevailing in national law enforcement systems. The seminar will end with an analysis of special difficulties encountered by international criminal courts. Scheduled examination or paper option. Enrollment limited to twenty. M.R. Damaška.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10045
    Exam: 12/16/2015 at 2:00 PM SLB: 122
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 2 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20202-01
    • Property, Social Justice, and the Environment
    • Rose
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Property, Social Justice, and the Environment (20202). 2 or 3 units. Private property is sometimes cast as the villain in social and environmental problems, but sometimes it is cast as the solution to the same problems. This seminar will explore the relationship of property to social and environmental concerns in the context of several past and present controversies over property rights, and particularly in the light of current concerns with cl;imate change. We will begin with some basic theories about the “commons” problem and the ways that property rights do or do not evolve to address that problem. Time permitting, other topics may include: land rights; land reform and development projects (primarily less developed countries); wildlife and fisheries management (global); water management (United States and global); tradable pollution rights (United States); carbon trading schemes and other less conventional approaches to climate change management; property aspects of climate change adaptation; free market environmentalism and private land use restrictions (conservationist or exclusionary?) (United States and global); and indigenous land claims and claims to intellectual property (global). While we will search for common themes about the range, capacities and limitations of property regimes, theoretical purity should not be expected in this overview; moreover, topics may change in response to particular student interest. The class will meet twice weekly during the first seven to eight weeks of the term. Paper required; may be reflective (2 units) or research (3 units). Enrollment limited to eighteen. C.M. Rose.

    Location: ASH40 - A424 (Mon)
    ASH40 - A424 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10091

    Close
    • 30193-01
    • *†Prosecution Externship and Instruction
    • Stith
      Brennan
      Silverman
    • Wed 3:30 PM-5:20 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Prosecution Externship and Instruction (30193). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical externship will assist state or federal prosecutors with their responsibilities, both before and at trial. Federal placements are available in New Haven and surrounding cities or in Bridgeport; the federal caseload is varied, including misdemeanors, felonies, or specialized areas such as career criminal, drug trafficking, or appellate work. The State’s Attorney for New Haven, which also has a varied but faster-paced docket, can take one or two student placements. All students are required to attend weekly class sessions, which will range from discussions of assigned readings to field trips to prisons, police laboratories, etc. Students will be required toshall keep journals and time records. Placements at the U.S. Attorney's Office must be arranged at least four months in advance, to allow time for security clearance procedures. Students also apply for the State's Attorney during the previous term, though interviews may take place after the student has been accepted into the Externship program. Although enrollment is limited and permission of the instructor is required, timing and the involvement of outside agencies remove this clinic from the usual sign-up process for limited enrollment courses. Selection for this course takes place before limited-enrollment course bidding. K. Stith, L. Brennan, and M. Silverman.

    Course Bidding Information: Select this course as your lowest weight among experiential course selections. Open only to students who have been pre-selected to participate. Do not select this course during pre-registration if you are not one of those students.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Note: The first class meeting will be at the Law School. Thereafter, the class will meet at the U.S. Attorney's Office.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10461

    Close
    • 20297-01
    • Regulation of Energy Extraction
    • Elliott
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Regulation of Energy Extraction (20297). 2 or 3 units. This course will explore the troubled intersection between energy and environmental policies. We will consider a diverse range of regulatory approaches to minimize adverse environmental effects of various forms of energy development. These include emerging issues regarding hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) in the United States and European Union; regulation of off-shore drilling and lessons from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill; liability for natural resources and other damages from oil spills under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA90); the Fukushima, Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear accidents; applicability of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to oil and coal leases on federal lands; the Endangered Species Act; visual pollution and other issues relating to windfarms; coal mine disasters; mountaintop mining and the Mine Safety Act; and tailings piles and the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). The class will conclude by considering how concerns about climate change may affect the future of energy development. No prerequisites. Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit available. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. E.D. Elliott.

    Note: No more than three absences are permitted.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10050
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20292-01
    • The State and Local Budget Crisis: Seminar
    • Schleicher
      Ravitch
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    [The] State and Local Budget Crisis: Seminar (20292). 2 or 3 units. While the reviving economy has substantially improved the fiscal picture of the federal government, state and local government budgets continue to be under extreme amounts of stress. The most visible examples have been bankruptcies in cities like Detroit, Center Falls, RI and Stockton, CA, and severe fiscal crises in jurisdictions like Puerto Rico and Illinois. But there are many states and localities that have made budget, pension, and health care promises that seem beyond their capacity to keep, and are further beset by gyrating revenue streams, increasing Medicaid costs, and federal budget cuts. The problems these jurisdictions face seem structural, not cyclical. The effect of these budget crises can be seen in crumbling infrastructure, reduced education spending, and in the way layoffs at the state and local level contributed substantially to the size and extent of unemployment following the Great Recession.

    This seminar will review the role of law and lawyers in causing, and potentially solving, the state and local budget crisis. Doing so will involve analyzing everything from municipal bankruptcy to state constitutional law to federal tax deductions. It will be co-taught by Professor Schleicher and Richard Ravitch, whose career in government has spanned nearly fifty years, including playing a key role in the New York City fiscal crisis of the mid-1970s, and serving as Lieutenant Governor of New York and Chairman of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. He also co-chaired the State and Local Budget Crisis Task Force with Paul Volcker. There will also be a number of guest speakers to help sort through the complex and fascinating legal and policy problems posed by this on-going crisis. The course will be two-credits, but will have a 3-credit option for students who want to write extended papers. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. D.N. Schleicher and R. Ravitch.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10093

    Close
    • 20667-01
    • The Wartime Practice of National Security Law
    • Hathaway
      Preston
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    [The] Wartime Practice of National Security Law (20667). 2 or 3 units. This course will examine current legal issues surrounding covert action and the overt use of military force by the United States since September 11, 2001. The course is taught by Professor Oona Hathaway with Stephen Preston, who for the past six years has served as General Counsel of the Department of Defense and, before that, CIA General Counsel. The course will examine national security law from the perspective of a government lawyer who has to make tough decisions regarding how to advise clients as they seek to counter real threats to U.S. national security. The class will review the substance of legal issues that are currently under debate, as well as consider the practical challenges that face a lawyer practicing in the context of ongoing armed conflict. Among the topics to be covered are the law governing covert action, the bin Laden raid, the President's constitutional powers as Commander in Chief versus Congressional authorization to use military force, the emergence of the threat posed by Daesh (also known as ISIL, ISIS and IS), defining the enemy and associated forces, the American citizen who takes up arms against his country, limitations on U.S. counterterrorism operations under international law, use of remotely piloted aircraft, responsibility for the conduct of partner forces, determining the end of the conflict, and secrecy versus transparency. Students who write a paper, with permission of the instructors, may earn a third unit. Enrollment limited to twenty-four. Permission of the instructors required. O. Hathaway and S.W. Preston.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should submit a brief statement of interest and a CV by 4:30 p.m. on June 25. Listing this course as a permission-of-instructor selection constitutes permission for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of the student's YLS transcript to the instructors.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10063

    Close
    • 20346-01
    • [The] Law and Regulation of Banks and Other Financial Intermediaries
    • Macey
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 to 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    [The] Law and Regulation of Banks and Other Financial Intermediaries (20346). 2 or 3 units. This course will begin with an overview of the legal and business environment in which banks and other financial intermediaries (investment banks, insurance companies) operate. The course will focus on the law, history, politics and economics affecting firms engaged in businesses such as banking, insurance, investment banking, mutual funds. We will then discuss entry into the business of banking; the dual banking system; the shadow banking system; corporate governance of banks, activities restrictions and limitations on investments; the regulation of deposit taking; safety and soundness regulation and prudential restriction of bank activities; consumer protection and lender liability; mutual funds; consumer protection and capital requirements; insurance and securities powers of banks and non-banks; affiliations between banks and other companies; examination and enforcement issues; bank failure; and international banking. Particular attention will be paid to the recurring problem of financial crisis, systemic risk and to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act provisions related to consumer protection, the resolution of failed banks. The concept of “Systemically Important Financial Institutions” and the “Volcker rule,” which purports to prohibit banks and bank holding companies from engaging in proprietary trading (trading with their own capital rather than on behalf of customers) will also be subjects of attention. There are no prerequisites for this course. Information about financial economics and accounting and market microstructure that may be necessary in order to understand the legal and policy concepts developed in the course will be taught as part of the course. Self-scheduled examination and short paper required for 3 units of credit, or self-scheduled examination only for 2 units of credit. J.R. Macey.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10072
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20576-01
    • Health Law
    • Hall
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 2 to 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Health Law (20576). 2 or 3 units. This course will introduce students to the structure, financing and regulation of the health care system and proposals for its reform. Legal topics include The Affordable Care Act, Medicare, medical staff disputes, health care antitrust, HMOs and insurance regulation. Enrollment capped at forty. Self-scheduled examination. M. Hall.

    Note: This course will meet on a three-unit-course time pattern from Monday, September 14 through Wednesday, November 18.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10062
    Exam: 11/22/2015 - 12/12/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 1 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20419-01
    • Regulation and Legal Culture: The Case of Automobile Safety Regulation
    • Mashaw
      Harfst
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 to 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Regulation and Legal Culture: The Case of Automobile Safety Regulation (20419). 2 or 3 units. In 1965, the United States began a radical new experiment in auto safety regulation. The goal was to force the technology of automobile design in ways that privileged safety over style and power. The technique was general rulemaking demanding advanced safety performance in the entire vehicle fleet. This seminar will explore the history of this ambitious effort over the past fifty years, and, in particular, the way administrative regulation has been shaped by a legal culture that favors state initiative, ex post compensatory or remedial action and legislative or judicial norm development. Paper required, which may satisfy the Substantial Paper or Supervised Analytic Writing requirement. Enrollment limited to twelve. J.L. Mashaw and D. Harfst.

    Location: ASH40 - A424 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10075

    Close
    • 30126-01
    • Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Wishnie
      Middleton
      Parkin
      Li
    • 2 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork (30126). 2 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Veterans Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, B. Li, J. Parkin, M. Middleton.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10179

    Close
    • 30130-01
    • Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Wishnie
      Hallett
      Parkin
    • 2 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork (30130). 2 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, N. Hallett, and J. Parkin.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10175

    Close
    • 20140-01
    • Comparative Constitutional Law
    • Ackerman
      Albert
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 to 4
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Comparative Constitutional Law (20140). 2 unit, or more units with permission of the instructors. An effort to define the key concepts adequate for an evaluation of the worldwide development of modern constitutionalism since the Second World War. Enrollment limited. Also PLSC. B. Ackerman and R. Albert.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10039
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 48 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20508-01
    • †Advanced Deals Workshop: Public Company M&A
    • Robinson
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:30 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • faculty permission
    • exam required
    Expand

    †Advanced Deals Workshop: Public Company M&A (20508). 3 units. This course will be an advanced deals workshop focusing on the practical and legal issues that corporate lawyers face in structuring and negotiating merger and acquisition transactions involving public companies, as well as planning and defending against hostile takeovers. Topics will include understanding the roles of corporate lawyers and other players in M&A transactions, structuring deals, drafting and negotiating merger agreements to allocate risk and protect the deal, designing and implementing corporate takeover defenses including litigation strategies, planning hostile takeovers, managing conflict transactions including squeeze-outs and leveraged buyouts, and responding to shareholder activists and hedge funds. Prerequisite: Business Organizations or equivalent. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to fourteen. Self-scheduled examination. E. S. Robinson.

    Note: The first two class meetings will take place on Tuesday, September 8 and Tuesday, September 15, from 4:10-6:30, to replace the classes scheduled for September 4 and September 14. Beginning on Monday, September 21, the class will meet according to its regular Monday schedule.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a copy of their CV by the end of the pre-registration period on June 25. Listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of the student's YLS transcript to the instructor.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10090
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20032-01
    • †Advanced Legal Writing
    • Harrison
    • Tue 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Legal Writing (20032). 3 units. This course will provide practice in writing legal memoranda and briefs. Students will have the opportunity to refine analytical as well as writing skills. The goal of the course will be to take students beyond basic competence to excellence in legal writing. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to ten. R.D. Harrison.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10067

    Close
    • 30218-01
    • †Advanced Written Advocacy
    • Messing
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Written Advocacy (30218). 3 units. This seminar will train students to advocate for their clients more effectively. To improve students' strategic writing, we will scrutinize excellent trial motions and appellate briefs to see how top practitioners tell their clients' stories, organize and build legal arguments, and advance their clients' strategic interests. We will also review numerous other types of litigation-related documents, including letters, memoranda, complaints, and document requests. Although the course will provide a fair amount of instruction about the stylistic side of "legal writing," it will focus on advocacy's more substantive facets. Students will prepare several assignments, at least one of which will be prepared as part of a team. N. Messing.

    Note: Students may not drop the course after the second class session begins.

    Course Selection: This course does not require permission of the instructor, so students should list it as their lowest preference among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10162

    Close
    • 20432-01
    • Advanced Competition, Economics and Policy
    • Scott Morton
    • Mon 2:40 PM-4:00 PM
      Wed 2:40 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Advanced Competition, Economics, and Policy (20432). 3 units. The course will follow on from the Competetive Strategy elective in the School of Management. We will analyze and discuss competitive behaviors that courts and agencies have determined from the boundary restricted under the antitrust laws. We will learn the economics underlying those strategies and the legal rules that may restrict firms' strategies. We will discuss the evidence and reasoning that have been used to argue for the legality or illegality of behavior and determine effects on social welfare. We will cover the goals and procedures of the U.S. and EU antitrust agencies. This course will follow the School of Management calendar. Examination required. Also MGT 589a. F. Scott Morton.

    Note: The final examination will be a closed-book exam covering all the material in the course. It will take place on the last day of the class.

    Course Selection: Although there are no specific prerequisites for this course, interested Law students should send a short email to Professor Scott Morton (fiona.scottmorton@yale.edu) before the end of the fall course selection period on June 25 to indicate their background in economics, including course work, to ensure they will be able to handle the material covered in class.

    Location: EVANS - 4230 (Mon)
    EVANS - 4230 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10946
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30101-01
    • *†Advocacy for Children and Youth
    • Peters
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Advocacy for Children and Youth (30101). 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical seminar will represent children and youth in abuse, neglect, uncared for, potentially termination of parental rights cases in the Superior Court for Juvenile Matters and certain related matters. Class sessions will focus on substantive law, ethical issues arising from the representation of children and youth in the relevant contexts, interviewing and lawyering competencies, case discussions, and background materials relating to state intervention into the family. Class will meet weekly with occasional supplemental sessions to be arranged. Additionally, students will attend weekly case supervision sessions. Casework will require, on average, ten to twelve hours weekly, but time demands will fluctuate over the course of the term; class time will be concentrated in the first half of the term. Enrollment limited to four. J.K. Peters.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, interested students must submit a signed statement of understanding the commitment to continued case work until graduation by the close of early registration on June 25, 2015, at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Due to our immediate commitments to our clients, Professor Peters will finalize the roster by email before the first class, after which the clinic cannot be dropped. Because classes prepare students for client work, attendance at all classes is mandatory.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and either of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance: Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10163

    Close
    • 20009-01
    • Anglo-American Legal History: Directed Research
    • Langbein
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Anglo-American Legal History: Directed Research (20009). 3 units. An opportunity for supervised research and writing on topics to be agreed. The object will be to produce work of publishable quality. Papers normally go through several drafts. Prerequisite: History of the Common Law or evidence of comparable background in legal history. Paper required. Permission of the instructor required: Interested students should meet with the instructor before the opening of the pre-registration period. J.H. Langbein.

    Course Bidding Information: Before listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, interested students should meet with the instructor before the opening of the early course selection period on June 11.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10071

    Close
    • 30196-01
    • *†Appellate Advocacy
    • Schaller
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Appellate Advocacy: The Art of Appellate Practice and Procedure (30196). 3 units. This course will provide an introduction to appellate practice and procedure, designed to teach students the basic substantive knowledge and skills needed to advocate effectively on behalf of a client in an appellate court. The course begins with entry of judgment in the trial court and proceeds through preliminary motion practice, briefing and oral argument. Connecticut’s appellate rules will be applied. Students will act as lawyers in a simulated appellate case based on a trial record and transcript, as well as preside during class in various roles including roles of trial judge and appellate judge. In addition to the basic instruction and analysis of selected opinions, invited practitioners and judges will address appellate advocacy and legal analysis. Students will be required to submit a two-page reflection paper. Enrollment limited to sixteen. Permission of the instructor required. B.R. Schaller.

    Note: Accepted students will be notified following the early course selection period and will be asked to confirm their commitment to the course. First-day attendance is required. No drops will be permitted after the first class meeting.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10460

    Close
    • 20581-01
    • Art and International Human Rights: Theory and Practice
    • Silk
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Art and International Human Rights: Theory and Practice (20581). 3 units graded, with a credit/fail option. This seminar will examine the dynamic connections between art and artistic practices and international human rights. Through readings, guest speakers, and workshops with artists, the seminar will consider the possibilities of art as an agent of social change; the relationships between aesthetics, politics, and ethics, with special attention to representations of suffering and atrocity; case studies of collaboration among artists, lawyers, and advocates; and issues of truth and objectivity in documentary. Students will also participate in collaborative projects with commissioned artists (for example, visual artists, playwrights, or choreographers), working closely with them in the design, research, and realization of new works. Student work on these projects will take the form of an “artistic research clinic.” Guest speakers will include scholars, artists, curators, and human rights practitioners from across the world. Graduate students from diverse disciplines are encouraged to enroll. Paper requirement. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Permission of the instructor required. J.J. Silk.

    Course Selection Information: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, student interested in applying for the seminar should submit a resume and a short statement of interest to barbara.mianzo@yale.edu no later than 4:30 pm on June 25. The statement should be no longer than one single-spaced page. It should primarily explain why you are interested in participating in the seminar and should also include a brief summary of any experiences (employment, classes, volunteer activities) that would be relevant to your interest in art and human rights.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10094

    Close
    • 20083-01
    • Behavioral and Institutional Economics
    • Shiller
    • Mon 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
      Wed 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Behavioral and Institutional Economics (20083). 3 units. Behavioral economics incorporates insights from other social sciences, such as psychology and sociology, into economic models, and attempts to explain anomalies that defy standard economic analysis. Institutional economics is the study of the evolution of economic organizations, laws, contracts, and customs as part of a historical and continuing process of economic development. Behavioral economics and institutional economics are naturally treated together, since so much of the logic and design of economic institutions has to do with complexities of human behavior. Topics include economic fluctuations and speculation, herd behavior, attitudes toward risk, money illusion, involuntary unemployment, saving, investment, poverty, identity, religion, trust, risk management, social welfare institutions, private risk management institutions, and institutions to foster economic development. Midterm examination and take-home final examination of short essay form. Also ECON 527a/MGT 565a. R.J. Shiller.

    Note: This course will follow the School of Management calendar. This class will meet on the following dates: September 2, 4, 14, 16, 18, 21, 23, 28, 30; October 5, 7, 14, 26, 28; November 2, 4, 9, 16, 18, 30; December 2, 7, 9, 11 (tentative), 14, 16. Additional information will be distributed on the syllabus.

    Location: EVANS - 1300 (Mon)
    EVANS - 1300 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10137
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20067-01
    • Capital Markets
    • Gorton
    • Tue 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
      Thu 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Capital Markets (20067). 3 units. Capital Markets is a course covering a range of topics, including the design, pricing, and trading of corporate bonds, structured notes, hybrid securities, credit derivatives, and structured products, such as asset-backed securities and structured notes. This course aims to provide a set of tools, concepts, and ideas that will serve students over the course of a career. Basic tools such as fixed income mathematics, swaps, and options are studied and used to address security design, trading, and pricing questions. The legal and institutional context of these subjects is also covered, i.e., the contractual basis of bonds and derivatives. Topics are approached from different angles: conceptual, legal, and technical theory, cases, documents (e.g., bond prospectuses, derivatives contracts, consent solicitations), and current events. Students should have taken introductory finance and have some knowledge of basic statistics (e.g., regression analysis, conditional probability), basic mathematics (e.g., algebra, matrix algebra); working knowledge of a spreadsheet package is helpful. Two examinations, six cases, and fourteen homework problems. Also MGT 947a. G. Gorton.

    Note: This course will meeting according to the Yale School of Management calendar. It is taught in two sections. There will be seats for 10 Law students in each section.

    Location: EVANS - 4200 (Tue)
    EVANS - 4200 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10503
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20067-02
    • Capital Markets
    • Gorton
    • Tue 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
      Thu 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Capital Markets (20067). 3 units. Capital Markets is a course covering a range of topics, including the design, pricing, and trading of corporate bonds, structured notes, hybrid securities, credit derivatives, and structured products, such as asset-backed securities and structured notes. This course aims to provide a set of tools, concepts, and ideas that will serve students over the course of a career. Basic tools such as fixed income mathematics, swaps, and options are studied and used to address security design, trading, and pricing questions. The legal and institutional context of these subjects is also covered, i.e., the contractual basis of bonds and derivatives. Topics are approached from different angles: conceptual, legal, and technical theory, cases, documents (e.g., bond prospectuses, derivatives contracts, consent solicitations), and current events. Students should have taken introductory finance and have some knowledge of basic statistics (e.g., regression analysis, conditional probability), basic mathematics (e.g., algebra, matrix algebra); working knowledge of a spreadsheet package is helpful. Two examinations, six cases, and fourteen homework problems. Also MGT 947a. G. Gorton.

    Note: This course will meeting according to the Yale School of Management calendar. It is taught in two sections. There will be seats for 10 Law students in each section.

    Location: EVANS - 4400 (Tue)
    EVANS - 4400 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10504
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30161-01
    • †Capital Punishment Clinic
    • Bright
      Parrent
      Sanneh
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Capital Punishment Clinic (30161). 6 units (3 fall, 3 spring), credit/fail in the fall term with the option of graded credit in the spring. Students will gain firsthand experience in capital defense, working as part of a team representing indigent defendants facing the death penalty in cases being handled by the Southern Center for Human Rights in Atlanta, the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, or Connecticut Public Defenders. Projects and case assignments will vary according the position of each clinic case in the process, but all projects will require legal research, analysis and writing, strategy meetings with team members, and preparation for appellate arguments and may include interviews with clients or witnesses. Students will complete at least one substantial writing assignment, such as a portion of a motion, brief, or memorandum of law. Opportunity for summer travel to the South to conduct research and investigation with the Southern Center for Human Rights is available but not required. Students may enroll in either the fall or spring term, or both. The course is limited to students who have taken Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, and Disadvantage. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to four. S.B. Bright, A. Parrent, and S. Sanneh.

    Course Bidding Information: List this clinic among your experiential course selections. In addition, please describe briefly why you would like to take the clinic; whether you will have sufficient time to devote to the clinic; past work experience (including summer work between years of law school); and what you expect or would like to do upon graduation. Include the paper or project you completed for Capital Punishment class or some other example of your legal analysis and writing. Statements must be sent directly to Professor Bright (stephen.bright@yale.edu) by June 25, 2015, at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10149

    Close
    • 30197-01
    • †Civil Litigation Practice
    • Gold
      Acee
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:30 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Civil Litigation Practice. (30197). 3 units. The course will begin with an overview of pleadings, discovery, and the anatomy of a civil lawsuit. It will then proceed to isolate and develop the skills of oral advocacy, through extensive learning-by-doing exercises, including conducting depositions; performing opening statements and closing arguments; conducting direct and cross examinations of courtroom witnesses; and participating in a full-day jury trial. The course will also include preparation of pleadings and analysis of and critical thinking regarding the elements, underpinnings, and efficacy of the litigation process. The course materials include selected readings and three complete case files published by the National Institute of Trial Advocacy. A participatory session on mediation, under the guidance of an experienced mediator, is included. Prerequisite: Trial Practice. Enrollment limited to twelve. E.K. Acee and F. Gold.

    Note: First-day attendance is required. No drops will be permitted after the first class meeting.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10456

    Close
    • 20490-01
    • Corporate Environmental Management and Strategy
    • Esty
      Chertow
    • Mon 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
      Wed 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Corporate Environmental Management and Strategy (20490). 3 units. This survey course will focus on understanding how adroit environmental management and strategy can enhance business opportunities; reduce risk, including resource dependency; promote cooperation; and decrease environmental impact. The course will combine lectures, case studies, and class discussions on management theory and tools, legal and regulatory frameworks shaping the business-environment interface, and the evolving requirements for business success (including how to deal with diverse stakeholders, manage in a world of transparency, and address rising expectations related to corporate responsibility). This course will meet according to the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies calendar. Paper required. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to forty, from all Yale schools; ten seats are reserved for Law students.Also F&ES 807a and MGT 688a. D.C. Esty and M. Chertow.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest and prior experience and a CV by the close of the early registration period at 4:30 pm on June 25.

    Location: EVANS - 2210 (Mon)
    EVANS - 2210 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10052

    Close
    • 20507-01
    • Corporate Finance
    • Tookes
    • Tue 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
      Thu 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Corporate Finance (20507). 3 units. This course will focus on financial management from the perspective of inside the corporation or operating entity. It will use lectures to develop the theory, and cases and problem sets to provide applications. Topics covered include capital budgeting and valuation; capital structure; initial public offerings; mergers; and corporate restructuring. This course will follow the School of Management calendar. Also MGT 541a.. H. Tookes.

    Note: This course is offered in two sections. There will be five places for Law students in each section, for a total of 10 places.

    Location: EVANS - 2400 (Tue)
    EVANS - 2400 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10505

    Close
    • 20507-02
    • Corporate Finance
    • Tookes
    • Tue 1:00 PM-2:20 PM
      Thu 1:00 PM-2:20 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Corporate Finance (20507). 3 units. This course will focus on financial management from the perspective of inside the corporation or operating entity. It will use lectures to develop the theory, and cases and problem sets to provide applications. Topics covered include capital budgeting and valuation; capital structure; initial public offerings; mergers; and corporate restructuring. This course will follow the School of Management calendar. Also MGT 541a.. H. Tookes.

    Note: This course is offered in two sections. There will be five places for Law students in each section, for a total of 10 places.

    Location: EVANS - 2400 (Tue)
    EVANS - 2400 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10506

    Close
    • 20270-01
    • Criminal Procedure: Investigation
    • Duke
    • Tue 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-3:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Procedure: Investigation (20270). 3 units. This course will cover the law regulating searches and seizures (including electronic eavesdropping); the interrogation of suspects, witnesses, and defendants; bail; preliminary hearings; grand jury proceedings and the right to counsel. Attendance and participation may be considered in grading. Students who regularly do not attend will be dropped from the class. Scheduled examination. S.B. Duke.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Tue)
    SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10047
    Exam: 12/18/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30182-01
    • †Criminal Justice Reform: Theory and Research in Action
    • Tyler
      Quattlebaum
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Criminal Justice Reform: Theory and Research in Action (30182). 3 units, credit/fail. We are at a pivotal moment with respect to American policing (and arguably the U.S. criminal justice system more generally). Police shootings in Ferguson, North Charleston, Cleveland, and Cincinatti —as well as the death of Eric Garner after police put him in a chokehold in Staten Island and the death of Freddie Gray after he was transported in a police van in Baltimore—have brought national attention to the questions of how police should do their jobs and even how that job should be defined. Perhaps at no point since the 1960’s, when the Kerner Commission wrote an influential report on American policing following a period of widespread urban unrest, have long-held assumptions about the purposes and methods of policing been called so deeply into question. Academics and researchers can and should be a part of the conversation about how to make policing (and all of the components of criminal justice operation) simultaneously more effective, just, and democratic.

    Participants in this workshop will explore theories (procedural justice, legitimacy, social network analysis, implicit bias, among others) and empirical findings that are being marshaled to re-think the function and form of policing. They will also engage in research projects and public policy advocacy that aim to give these ideas practical effect. Our immodest goal is that participants should have an opportunity to help define the face of American policing in the 21st century. We meet weekly; preparation and attendance at these discussions are required for credit. If you need to miss a class, please be in touch with the professors in advance of the meeting. Students missing more than two sessions without permission will not receive credit. Graded credit may be available to students who wish to write papers (including Substantial Papers and Supervised Analytic Writing papers) in connection with this course. Enrollment limited to twenty. Permission of the instructors is required. T. Tyler and M. Quattlebaum.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should submit a one-paragraph statement of why they would like to join the workshop and what they hope to get out of the course. Students who hve worked on the project in the previous year should indicate that experience in their statement. Statements should be submitted by June 25 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: ASH40 - A422 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10701

    Close
    • 30162-01
    • † *Education Adequacy Project
    • Rosen
      Knopp
      Smith
      Moodhe
    • Mon 5:10 PM-7:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Education Adequacy Project (30162). 3 units. The Education Adequacy Project (EAP) provides a unique opportunity for students to participate in and help lead institutional reform litigation. The EAP pursues a single complex lawsuit to ensure the State of Connecticut provides all Connecticut children with adequate and equitable educations. Students work with attorneys at Debevoise & Plimpton as well as local counsel in an integrated trial team. A major, multi-week trial is scheduled to begin in October 2015 and, barring a change in schedule, the next semester will involve supporting, attending and participating in the trial. Students have to date played a significant role in determining the case's litigation strategy. Class time is devoted to litigation strategy and discussion with supervising attorneys; training in litigation skills; and internal clinic logistics.

    New students should be aware that it may be difficult to become fully oriented with the case in the short time between the beginning of the semester and the anticipated start of trial. The clinic however will accept a limited number of new students if they are exceptionally interested and eager to participate. Permission of the instructors required. D.N. Rosen, A.A. Knopp, J.P. Moodhe, and D.H. Smith.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students should send a short e-mail describing their interest in the clinic to eapdirect@panlists.yale.edu by 4:30 p.m. on June 25.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10483

    Close
    • 30164-01
    • *†Environmental Protection Clinic
    • Galperin
      Suatoni
      Hawkins
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Environmental Protection Clinic (30164). 3 units, credit/fail. A clinical seminar in which students will be engaged with actual environmental law or policy problems on behalf of client organizations (environmental groups, government agencies, international bodies, etc.). The class will meet weekly, and students will work ten to twelve hours per week in interdisciplinary groups (with students from the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and other departments or schools at Yale) on projects with a specific legal or policy product (e.g., draft legislation or regulations, hearing testimony, analytic studies, policy proposals). Students may propose projects and client organizations, subject to approval by the instructor. Enrollment limited to thirty. Also F&ES 970a. J. Galperin, D. Hawkins, and L. Suatoni.

    Course Bidding: Students should contact Professor Galperin for a list of available projects and a description of the application process in order to complete all necessary steps, in addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, before June 25 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: First-day attendance is required.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10187

    Close
    • 30166-01
    • *†Ethics Bureau at Yale: Pro Bono Professional Responsibility Advice and Advocacy
    • Fox
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Ethics Bureau at Yale: Pro Bono Professional Responsibility Advice and Advocacy (30166). 3 units. Lawyers' need for ethics advice, consultation and expert opinions is not limited to those whose clients can pay. Impecunious clients and the lawyers who serve them are in need of ethics counseling and legal opinions on a regular basis. For example, Yale law students have provided essential assistance preparing amicus briefs in numerous Supreme Court cases. A few of these cases resulted in victory for the petitioner and citations to the amicus brief in the majority opinions.

    The work of the Bureau consists of four major components. First, the Bureau provides ethics counseling for pro bono organizations such as legal services offices, public defenders, and other NGO’s. Second, the Bureau prepares standard-of-care opinions relating to the conduct of lawyers, prosecutors and judges that are required.

    In cases alleging ineffective assistance of counsel and other challenges to lawyer conduct. Third, from time to time, the Yale Ethics Bureau provides assistance to amici curiae, typically bar associations or ethics professors, on questions of professional responsibility in cases in which such issues are front and center. It did so in a United States Supreme Court case, Maples v. Allen, citing the amicus brief of the clinic. Fourth, the Bureau provides ethics opinions for the National Association of Public Defenders, position papers for various American Bar Association entities, articles for law reviews and other publications, and editorials on topics of current interest.

    The twelve students working at the Bureau meet for class two hours per week and are expected to put in approximately ten hours on Bureau projects each week. The classroom work explores the law governing lawyers, but also considers the role of expert witnesses in the litigation process, its appropriateness and the procedural issues thereby raised. No prerequisites. Preference given to prior Ethics Bureau enrollees and students who previously took the instructor’s ethics class. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of the instructor required. L. Fox.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among the experiential course selections, interested students should also submit a short statement of interest by the close of the bidding period on June 25 at 4:30 p.m. In the statement, students should describe their interest in participation in the ethics bureau and any relevant background.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is required. There is a no-drop policy for this course.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10153

    Close
    • 20622-01
    • *Ethics in Law and Markets
    • Macey
      Fleming
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    *Ethics in Law and Markets (20622). 3 units. The focus of this course is on how a society’s ethical norms and values have been reflected in societies throughout history. Generally speaking, this course will study the validity of the hypothesis that “an economic system runs on trust, reputation, and ethics, and that any deficit in these fundamental components of capital markets and financial markets necessarily will imperil the financial system as a whole." We will discuss the evolution of views on ethics in business generally and how, if at all, the dominant ethical views in a society affect business conditions. We also will consider the way that globalization and the emergence of economic interactions among many different cultures have affected attitudes and practices related to ethics. We also will consider what the future of trust, reputation and ethics in business. Attention will be paid to ethical issues within the private sector as well as in government and across society generally. Paper required. G. Fleming and J.R. Macey.

    Location: SLB - FAC-DINING (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10073

    Close
    • 20166-01
    • Evidence
    • Kahan
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Evidence (20166). 3 units. This course will examine the rules and doctrines regulating the presentation of factual proof in trials in the United States, with primary focus on the Federal Rules of Evidence. Scheduled examination. D.M. Kahan.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    SLB - 121 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10114
    Exam: 12/20/2015 at 1:00 PM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20038-01
    • Federal Indian Law
    • Fidell
    • Tue 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal Indian Law (20038). 3 units. This course will examine the trajectory of legal relations between Native American tribes and the federal and state governments. Particular attention will be given to shifting federal policies, tribal sovereignty and legislative competence, constitutional rights, tribal membership, criminal law (including the evolving jurisdiction of tribal courts following enactment of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013), family law, taxation, gaming, and the protection of natural and cultural resources. The American experience will be evaluated in light of the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the case law of other countries with indigenous populations, and decisions of international human rights bodies. There may be a field trip to one of the Connecticut reservations. Self-scheduled examination. E. R. Fidell.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10053
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20405-01
    • Financial Accounting
    • Antle
      Garstka
    • Tue 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Thu 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Financial Accounting (20405). 3 units. Financial Reporting will help students acquire basic accounting knowledge that is extremely useful in the day-to-day practice of law. Accounting systems provide important financial information for all types of organizations across the globe. Despite their many differences, all accounting systems are built on a common foundation. Economic concepts, such as assets, liabilities, and income, are used to organize information into a fairly standard set of financial statements. Bookkeeping mechanics compile financial information with the double entry system of debits and credits. Accounting conventions help guide the application of the concepts through the mechanics. This course provides these fundamentals of accounting and more. It looks at how U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) report transactions and events. The methodology will always be the same: understand the underlying economics of the transaction, and then understand GAAP. A key goal of the course is to have the student develop the ability to infer the economic events and transactions that underlie corporate financial reports. The institutional context within which financial reports are produced and used also plays a vital role in extracting and interpreting the information in those reports. The cases we study are invariably embedded in some context, and we will explore important elements of this context as they arise. Scheduled examination. R. Antle and S. Gartska.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Tue)
    SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10191
    Exam: 12/14/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20653-01
    • [The] Foundations of Legal Scholarship
    • Kahn
      Markovits
    • Thu 2:30 PM-4:00 PM
      Tue 4:30 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • exam required
    Expand

    [The] Foundations of Legal Scholarship (20653). 3 units. This seminar will focus on legal scholarship, including some older classics as well as newer work that we consider important. Books, articles, and papers will cover a wide range of subject areas and methodologies in both public law and private law. Permission of the instructors required. P.W. Kahn and D. Markovits.

    Course Bidding: All first-year students in the Ph.D. in Law program are admitted to this seminar, which is a requirement of their program. In addition, the instructors welcome applications from other students, particularly those interested in teaching law. Applications briefly outlining the student's interest in, and preparation for, this course should be sent by e-mail to both Professor Kahn and Professor Markovits by July 10, 2015.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Thu)
    ASH40 - A005 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10105
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20515-01
    • The Global Financial Crisis
    • Metrick
    • Wed 2:40 PM-5:40 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    [The] Global Financial Crisis (20515). 3 units. This course surveys the causes, events, policy responses, and aftermath of the recent global financial crisis. The main goal is to provide a comprehensive view of this major economic event within a framework that explains the dynamics of financial crises in a modern economy.

    The instructors aim to maximize the value of in-class time. To this end, students will be expected to watch the course lectures in advance on the Coursera platform, with class time reserved for discussions, cases, group presentations, and a crisis simulation. All students will be expected to contribute to class discussions both online and in-person. Secretary Geithner will lead the discussions and participate in breakout sessions on 10/7, 11/18, and 12/2. Professor Metrick will lead the discussions on other days, and will be in all classes and cycle through all breakout sessions. Quizzes, class participation, case presentation, crisis simulation and memo, and final paper required. A. Metrick.

    Note: This course will meet according to the School of Management calendar. Course materials will be posed on ClassesV2.

    Location: EVANS - 2400 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 14467

    Close
    • 30113-01
    • *†Immigration Legal Services
    • Peters
    • Mon 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Immigration Legal Services (30113). 3 units, credit/fail. A clinical seminar involving class sessions and casework. The clinic will specialize in the representation of persons who are seeking asylum through affirmative procedures or in removal proceedings or post-asylum relief. Class sessions will focus on the substantive and procedural law, on the legal and ethical issues arising in the context of casework and on the development of lawyering skills. Classes will be heavily concentrated in the first half of the term, with additional sessions supplementing the weekly class time. Students will also attend weekly supervisions on their case work. Enrollment limited to four. J.K. Peters.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.

    Note: Due to our immediate commitments to clients, Professor Peters will finalize the roster by email before the first class, after which the clinic cannot be dropped. Because classes prepare students for client work, attendance at all classes is mandatory.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10165

    Close
    • 20123-01
    • *In-House Lawyering: Ethics and Professional Responsibility
    • Daly
    • Mon 6:10 PM-9:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    *In-House Lawyering: Ethics and Professional Responsibility (20123). 3 units. This course will provide an introduction for identifying, analyzing and resolving (or at least mitigating) ethical challenges and professional responsibility issues. The challenges that corporate (or "in-house") counsel face will be our primary context because corporate counsel, as opposed to attorneys operating within a law firm or a government agency generally must identify and resolve ethical issues with limited external support. This course will be a thematic weekly seminar, with each class generally being dedicated to a specific issue or representational situation. Guest lecturers will occasionally supplement class discussion. There will be no foundational text, but students will need to purchase a bound copy of the ABA model rules and the Restatement. The readings for the course will be published opinions, law journal articles, and articles from the popular media (which will be available on the Internet or through Westlaw/Lexis). Previous exposure to professional responsibility concepts (e.g., another ethics class or prior preparation for the MPRE) is useful but is by no means a pre-requisite. Enrollment will be capped at thirty. Self-scheduled examination. B.T. Daly.

    Note: The first class meeting will be on Tuesday, September 1, from 6:10 until 9 pm, to replace the designated Monday class that was scheduled to meet on Friday, September 4. Thereafter, the class will resume meeting at its regular Monday time.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10066
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20326-01
    • International Environmental Law
    • Robinson
    • Wed 9:00 AM-11:50 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    International Environmental Law (20326). 3 units. An introduction to public international law that both governs the global commons-atmosphere, climate, oceans, and stratospheric ozone layer-and guides the national obligations for ensuring transnational public health, advancing sustainable development, and managing the Earth's shared resources: sources of energy and renewable stocks of plants and animals, biodiversity, and ecosystems services. The course examines the emerging human rights to the environment, principles of international environmental law, and international duties for public participation in environmental decision making and access to justice. The major multilateral environmental agreements (MEAs) are studied, with examples of how States enact environmental law regimes to implement the MEAs. Decision-making procedures of United Nations agencies and other international and regional policy and legal decision making bodies are critically examined. The main texts are a law school casebook, D. Hunter, D. Zaelke, and J. Salzman, International Environmental Law and Policy (Foundation Press, 2002), and the UN Environment Programme's commissioned restatement of this body of law, N.A. Robinson and L. Kurukulasuriya, Manual on International Environmental Law (UNEP, 2006). Self-scheduled examination. Also F&ES 825a. N. A. Robinson.

    Location: KRN - 321 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 14051
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30115-01
    • †Landlord/Tenant Legal Services
    • Pottenger
      Dineen
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Landlord/Tenant Legal Services (30115). 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical seminar will provide legal assistance, under the supervision of clinical faculty, to low-income tenants facing eviction in the New Haven Housing Court. Topics to be covered in discussions and class materials will include the substantive law of landlord-tenant relations, the Connecticut Rules of Practice and Procedure, ethical issues arising in the representation of clients, social and housing policy, and the development of lawyering skills, particularly in interviewing, litigation, negotiation, and mediation. Weekly class sessions and supervision sessions, plus eight to twelve hours per week of casework. Enrollment limited to eight. F.X. Dineen and J.L. Pottenger, Jr.

    Note: Attendance at first class meeting is required. A no-drop policy will apply thereafter.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and anyof the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10489

    Close
    • 20090-01
    • Law and Economics Research Seminar
    • Klevorick
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Law and Economics Research Seminar (20090). 3 units. Research and writing on topics in law and economics. Topics to be arranged with the instructor. Students interested in preregistering for this course should submit topic statements to the professor. Paper required. Enrollment limited to six. Permission of the instructor required. A.K. Klevorick.

    Course Bidding Information: In addition to listing this course among their permission-of-the-instructor selections, students who are interested in taking the course should submit by 4:30 pm on June 25, a brief statement indicating a specific topic they would like to explore and the courses they have taken that are related to the topic. Professor Klevorick will select students for the seminar based on their topic statements.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10068

    Close
    • 30191-01
    • †Legal Assistance
    • Dineen
    • Fri 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Legal Assistance (30191). 3 units, credit/fail. A clinical seminar, using classroom, field work, and simulation experiences in the general area of legal assistance for the poor. Students will work eight to twelve hours per week in a local legal aid office and will attend weekly classroom sessions. The seminar will be practice-oriented, moving from developing solutions for specific client problems to general discussions of landlord-tenant, consumer, domestic relations, welfare, and other legal subjects of special concern to the urban poor, as well as issues of broader social policy. The seminar will also focus on the development of professional responsibility and lawyering skills, such as interviewing, negotiating, counseling, drafting, and litigation. A few placements for criminal defense work in state court will also be available. Enrollment limited to six to eight. F.X. Dineen.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic andany of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10458

    Close
    • 20522-01
    • *Legal Profession: Traversing the Ethical Minefield
    • Fox
    • Mon 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    *Legal Profession: Traversing the Ethical Minefield (20522). 3 units. Almost every course you take in law school makes you better able to help your clients fulfill their hopes and dreams. This course is designed to help fulfill your own professional obligations while also providing services to your clients consistent with their ethical entitlements. Through the use of hypothetical problems grounded in the real world, the class will explore many of the challenging dilemmas that confront the conscientious lawyer who wants to conform his or her conduct to the applicable rules of professional conduct and other law governing lawyers. At the same time we will consider whether the present rules of professional conduct properly address the issues with which the profession must grapple in striking delicate balances among the obligations of lawyers vis-à-vis clients, lawyers as officers of the court and lawyers as citizens. The class will use a casebook, Susan Martyn & Lawrence Fox, Traversing the Ethical Minefield, and a standards book, Susan Martyn, Lawrence Fox & Brad Wendel, The Law Governing Lawyers. Class attendance and participation are essential. Enrollment capped at forty. Scheduled examination. L. Fox.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    SLB - 121 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10054
    Exam: 12/17/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.25 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30118-01
    • †Legislative Advocacy Clinic
    • Pottenger
      Knopp
      Geballe
      Scalettar
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Legislative Advocacy Clinic (30118). 3 units, credit/fail. This clinical seminar will give students an opportunity to participate in the state legislative and policy-making processes by advancing – and defending – the interests of a Connecticut public interest organization of their choice. Clinic students may select their projects from a range of options supplied by the faculty, or they may approach the clinic with an organization/cause already in mind. Recently, students in the clinic have focused on public health, fair housing, workers' rights,juvenile justice, tax policy, and women’s health. One of our long-time clients (Connecticut Voices for Children) is a key player on a broad spectrum of policy issues affecting Connecticut families. The clinic’s work includes both affirmative legislative initiatives and defensive efforts to respond to proposed legislation deemed inimical to the interests of its clients. An orientation to Connecticut's politics and demographics, as well as on issues of ethics and professional responsibility for lawyers working in the legislative arena will be important foci of this clinic. In the fall term, students will develop policy proposals, participate in training sessions led by some of Connecticut’s most experienced lobbyists, meet with state legislators, and work with their client organizations to identify upcoming legislative issues. Once issues have been chosen for action, students will research the subject, work in coalition with other organizations, prepare and present “white papers,” and meet with legislators. In the spring, students will meet with legislators to get their bills introduced, develop oral and written testimony in support thereof, identify other witnesses, shepherd their bills through the committee process, and work to get them adopted. During the legislative session, students will also monitor other proposed legislation that might affect the clinic’s clients. To allow all students to participate in both the training/issue development and direct action aspects of the clinic’s work, priority will be given to students who commence their participation in the Fall term. Enrollment limited to fifteen. J.L. Pottenger, Jr., S.D. Geballe, A.A. Knopp, and E. Scalettar.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is required. A no-drop policy will apply.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10167

    Close
    • 30119-01
    • †Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic
    • Pottenger
      Gentes
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic (30119). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical seminar will represent homeowners fighting foreclosure in Connecticut state courts. They will conduct motion practice and discovery, including legal research and writing. Affirmative litigation against lenders, and a wide-ranging "amicus practice," also are important pieces of the clinic's work. Although this is primarily a litigation clinic, many of the clients are also participating in court-annexed mediation, in an effort to restructure their mortgages, so students will also gain experience in client counseling and ADR. Students will also provide brief advice and assistance to pro se homeowners at the courthouse. Enrollment limited to eighteen. J.L. Pottenger, Jr., and J. Gentes.

    Note: Attendance at first class meeting is required. A no-drop policy will apply.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10168

    Close
    • 20457-01
    • Property: Individual Research
    • Ellickson
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Property: Individual Research (20457). 3 units. The instructor will separately supervise up to six students who wish to write a paper on a property topic. To receive credit for satisfying the Supervised Analytic Writing requirement, a student must devote two terms of work to the paper. Enrollment limited to six. R.C. Ellickson.

    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10049

    Close
    • 20283-01
    • Qualitative Research Design in Legal Research
    • Stone Sweet
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Qualitative Research Design in Legal Research (20283). 3 units. This seminar introduces basic issues of method and research design for students engaged in qualitative legal research. It provides an overview of essential features of any major paper or thesis dissertation, a survey of approaches to qualitative research, as well as a check-list of common problems to try to avoid. Topics include: the components of a good literature review; concept-formation, typologies and theory-building; the uses of single case studies in building and testing theory; the problem of case selection and causal inference and how to manage them; and strategies for “small-n” comparison. The seminar will emphasize close reading and roundtable discussion of texts. Student will write two 3-page "response papers” on the readings for two of the sessions. Paper required (original research, substantial literature review, or prospectus). Enrollment limited to twelve. A. Stone Sweet.

    . Note: First-session attendance is required.

    Location: ASH40 - A005 (Mon)
    ASH40 - A005 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10098

    Close
    • 20299-01
    • [The] Regulation of Financial Institutions and Activities after the Financial Crisis
    • Rosenberg
    • Tue 4:10 PM-7:10 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    [The] Regulation of Financial Institutions and Activities after the Financial Crisis (20299). 3 units. The Dodd-Frank Act, signed by President Obama on July 21, 2010, undoubtedly represents the most significant change to regulation of the U.S. financial system since the aftermath of the Great Depression. Sown from the seeds of the global financial crisis, Dodd-Frank dramatically changes the rules of the game for financial institutions and other market participants. Understanding the fundamental changes currently underway in the financial system is critical for those who will work at financial institutions or serve as their counsel.

    This course, meant for both law school students and business school students, will explore the origins of Dodd-Frank in the financial crisis, the legislative process that formed Dodd-Frank, the overhaul of the financial regulatory system embedded in Dodd-Frank’s 848 pages and the work regulators have been doing to implement these changes. In addition to exploring the legal and regulatory underpinnings, it will also focus on the market response to these changes and describe how doing business in certain financial instruments today differs significantly from before the financial crisis.

    The course will primarily be assessed through a self-scheduled examination at the end of the semester. In addition, class participation and a sort presentation during the semester will factor into grading. Self-scheduled examination. Also MGT 642a. G.D. Rosenberg.

    Note: This course will follow the School of Management calendar.

    Location: EVANS - 4430 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10921
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20662-01
    • Rethinking Sovereignty: Human Rights and Globalization
    • Benhabib
    • Tue 3:30 PM-5:30 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Rethinking Sovereignty: Human Rights and Globalization (20662). 3 units. The crises of sovereignty and the end of sovereignty have been discussed in law, political science, and philosophy. Post-nationalist, cosmopolitan, as well as neo-liberal critics of sovereignty abound. This course will discuss alternative models of sovereignty, ranging from democratic iterations to popular constitutionalism, and will consider the implications of these models for the definition and enforcement of rights. Readings will include Hobbes, Kant, Schmitt, Arendt, Kelsen, Habermas, Waldron, Walker and Benveniste. This seminar will meet according to the Yale College calendar. Paper required. Enrollment limited and permission of the instructor required. Also PHIL 656a/PLSC 605a/PLSC 292a. S. Benhabib.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission of the instructor selections, students should submit a short statement of interest by June 25 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: RKZ - 202 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10454

    Close
    • 20630-01
    • [The] Robber Barons Reconsidered
    • Priest
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    [The] Robber Barons Reconsidered (20630). 3 units. The era of the Robber Barons refers to the period of great expansion of industry in the U.S. after the Civil War. The Robber Barons—Rockefeller, Carnegie, Mellon, among others – have been depicted as amassing immense wealth through questionable legal ventures, leading to the enactment of various forms of government regulation: the Interstate Commerce Act, the Sherman Antitrust Act and, as a result of the Great Depression – an alleged failure of capitalism related to the Robber Barons’ behavior – the Securities and Exchange Act as well as legislation regulating the national economy more broadly. The ambition of this course is to reevaluate the actions of the Robber Barons by means of modern law and economic analysis. The course will proceed by reading the principal Robber Baron history and then subjecting that history to modern analysis. Paper required. G.L. Priest.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10118

    Close
    • 20288-01
    • Securities Regulation
    • Morley
    • Tue 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Thu 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Securities Regulation (20288). 3 units. This course is an introduction to the statutes and rules administered by the Securities and Exchange Commission, with primary focus on the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. These statutes and rules regulate companies' ability to finance their operations by issuing stocks, bonds and other securities. The course is often dense and technical, but it has great practical relevance for students interested in the practice of law. The course will prepare students for work in capital raising, acquisitions and other corporate transactions, as well as for litigation involving allegations of fraud in public and private companies. Self-scheduled examination. J.D. Morley.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Tue)
    SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10085
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20668-01
    • Social Science and Institutional Design: The Empirical Evaluation of Legal Policies and Practices
    • Tyler
    • Tue 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Social Science and Institutional Design: The Empirical Evaluation of Legal Policies and Practices (20668). 3 units. The current legal system bases many of its policies and practices upon assumptions concerning human nature. What does research tell us about how those policies and practices actually operate? What alternative social science models are available and how would institutions be different if those models were used? This class will consider deterrence models and compare them to models emphasizing legitimacy; morality and social norms. Policing, the courts and corrections are examined and evaluated against available empirical evidence. The class will also consider alternative models of institutional design and evidence of their potential or actual effectiveness. Enrollment limited to twenty. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also PSYC 647a. T. Tyler.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10099
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30180-01
    • †Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic
    • Greenhouse
      Balkin
      Pincus
      Rothfeld
      Kimberly
      Hughes
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Supreme Court Advocacy (30180). 6 units (3 fall, 3 spring). This course will furnish the opportunity to combine hands-on clinical work with seminar discussion of Supreme Court decision making and advocacy. It will begin with several sessions analyzing the Court as an institution, focusing on the practicalities of how the Court makes its decisions and how lawyers present their cases. Thereafter, students will work on a variety of actual cases before the Court, preparing petitions for certiorari and merits briefs. Students will work under the supervision of Yale faculty and experienced Supreme Court practitioners. The course will be a two-term offering and the work product may be used to satisfy the Substantial Paper requirement. The course demands a significant time investment and is not recommended for students with other time-intensive commitments. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of instructors required. L. Greenhouse, P.W. Hughes, M.B. Kimberley, A. Pincus, C. Rothfeld and J.M. Balkin.

    Note: This course is open only to J.D. students.

    Course Bidding Information: Students admitted cannot drop during the open add/drop period. In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, any student wishing to be considered for admission must submit by June 25, 2015 at 4:30 p.m.: (1) a CV; (2) a writing sample (preferably involving legal writing); and (3) a one-page statement (a) addressing the nature of his or her interest in the course and (b) furnishing assurance that he or she will be able to satisfy the significant time commitments associated with the course. In connection with (b), applicants should indicate their anticipated course schedule for the 2015-2016 academic year, including their participation in other clinical offerings; any anticipated journal work; and anticipated writing to be completed independently of this course (including any papers that would satisfy the SAW or Substantial requirements). Significant academic or journal commitments outside of this course will certainly not be considered disqualifying, but will be taken into account in determining an applicant’s suitability for admission to the course. Other factors that will be considered include whether the applicant has already completed his or her SAW requirement. The submission of an application also constitutes consent to review of the applicant's Law School transcript. Note: Accepted students will be requested to limit class and other commitments after 3 p.m. on Wednesdays to ensure availability for team meetings.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10157

    Close
    • 20665-01
    • U.S. Foreign Policy and the Law
    • Koh
      Gewirtz
      Sullivan
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    U.S. Foreign Policy and the Law (20665). 3 units. This course will examine U.S. foreign policy decision-making, including the role of domestic and international law. It will cover a series of case studies, contemporary and historical, and focus on the perspective of those who make and implement U.S. foreign policy: How is policy developed? What constraints do policymakers face? How are intersecting issues of policy and law addressed and resolved? Grade will be based on class participation and a final examination or paper (to be negotiated with the instructors). Non-law students (graduate and undergraduate) may be admitted by permission of the instructors. Enrollment limited to thirty. Scheduled examination or paper option. J. Sullivan, P. Gewirtz, and H.H. Koh.

    Note: No drops will be permitted after the final day of the add/drop period. First-day class attendance is required.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10069
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30174-01
    • †Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic
    • Silk
      Metcalf
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3 or 4
    • Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    †Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30174). 3 or 4 units. Open only to students who have completed the Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. J.J. Silk and H.R. Metcalf.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10171

    Close
    • 30175-01
    • *†Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic
    • Schulz
      Balkin
      Manes
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3 or 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic (30175). 3 or 4 units, credit/fail for students in their first semester, graded for students in their second semester. Students in the clinic will work on all aspects of cases involving press freedom, open government, free speech, and related issues. Clients include investigative journalists, traditional and new media organizations, activists, advocacy organizations, researchers and academics. Pending matters typically include litigation under the First Amendment and Freedom of Information laws in both federal and state courts. The clinic's cases involve a diverse array of issues, focusing in particular on national security, surveillance, privacy, technology and government accountability. Students may also have the opportunity to engage in non-litigation advocacy and client counseling. The seminar will focus on substantive law, case discussions, skills training, and ethical issues. Students will have the opportunity to write related research papers. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. D. Schulz, J. Manes, and J.M. Balkin.

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who list this course among their experiential course selections should also submit a statement of interest and a CV to the instructor (jack.balkin@yale.edu) by June 25, at 4:30 p.m. Students should also indicate if they have previously applied to the course.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is mandatory for admitted students and for those on the waiting list who wish to remain in consideration for admission if a place becomes available. Because clinic work begins immediately, and is collaborative and intense, admitted students will be given early notice and asked to confirm their commitment to the course before the opening of the add/drop period. The last day for admitted students to drop the course is the day following the first class session.

    Location: ASH40 - A422 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10169

    Close
    • 20170-01
    • Administrative Law
    • Mashaw
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Administrative Law (20170). 4 units. This course will review the legal and practical foundations of the modern administrative state. Topics will include the creation of administrative agencies and the non-delegation doctrine, the internal process of adjudication and rulemaking in administrative agencies, judicial review of administrative action, the organization of the executive branch, liability for official misconduct, and beneficiary enforcement of public law. Scheduled examination. J.L. Mashaw.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Wed)
    SLB - 121 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10074
    Exam: 12/15/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20219-01
    • Business Organizations
    • Morley
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Business Organizations (20219). 4 units. This course will survey the law of business organizations with an emphasis on publicly traded corporations. The course will consider conflicts among shareholders and between shareholders and managers. We will survey the powers and duties of boards of directors and controlling shareholders and will address basic elements of finance as well as mergers and acquisitions, proxy fights and insider trading. We will pay particular attention to Delaware corporate law. We will also consider aspects of the law of agency and partnership. Self-scheduled examination. J.D. Morley.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10084
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 10001-01
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Amar
    • Thu 5:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 110 (Thu)
    ASH40 - A422 (Mon)
    ASH40 - A422 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12778
    Exam: 12/21/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 122
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 10001-02
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Balkin
    • Thu 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
      Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 110 (Thu)
    ASH40 - A420 (Mon)
    ASH40 - A420 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12779
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)

    Close
    • 10001-04
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Gerken
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    SLB - 110 (Wed)
    SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12781
    Exam: 12/21/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 121
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 10001-05
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Gewirtz
    • Fri 10:10 AM-11:00 AM
      Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 112 (Fri)
    SLB - 109 (Tue)
    SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12782
    Exam: 12/21/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 10001-06
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Kapczynski
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Fri 12:10 PM-1:00 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: ASH40 - A420 (Tue)
    ASH40 - A420 (Thu)
    ASH40 - A420 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12783
    Exam: 12/21/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 10001-A
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Rubenfeld
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 128 (Wed)
    SLB - 128 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12776
    Exam: 12/21/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 120
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 10001-B
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Siegel
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12777
    Exam: 12/21/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 11001-01
    • Contracts I
    • Brilmayer
    • Fri 10:10 AM-11:00 AM
      Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 124 (Fri)
    SLB - 110 (Tue)
    SLB - 110 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12786
    Exam: 12/19/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 122
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 11001-02
    • Contracts I
    • Chua
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    SLB - 111 (Wed)
    SLB - 124 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12787
    Exam: 12/19/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 121
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 11001-03
    • Contracts I
    • Hansmann
    • Fri 11:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 124 (Fri)
    SLB - 112 (Tue)
    SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12788
    Exam: 12/19/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 128
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 11001-04
    • Contracts I
    • Priest
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Fri 11:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: ASH40 - A422 (Tue)
    ASH40 - A422 (Thu)
    SLB - 112 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12789
    Exam: 12/19/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 11001-A
    • Contracts I
    • Carter
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 129 (Tue)
    SLB - 129 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12784
    Exam: 12/19/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 11001-B
    • Contracts I
    • Kronman
    • Wed 1:30 PM-3:00 PM
      Tue 2:10 PM-3:30 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-3:30 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 120 (Wed)
    SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12785
    Exam: 12/19/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 120
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20359-01
    • Criminal Procedure: Charging and Adjudication
    • Stith
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Procedure: Charging and Adjudication (20359). 4 units. This course has also been called “Criminal Procedure II.” We shall examine the law governing prosecution and criminal trials in the United States. While I hope that some significant portion of the class will already have taken a course on Criminal Law, Criminal Investigation, Evidence, or Federal Courts, there is no prerequisite for this course. The emphasis will be on the rules and practices of the state and federal courts in the United States but we shall also consider some comparative criminal adjudicative mechanisms. Students will be expected to critically consider the proper standards and institutions for provision of defense counsel and for regulating the grand jury, formal criminal charging, pre-trial release, plea-bargaining, discovery, speedy trial, jury selection, jury trial, sentencing, direct appeal, and collateral review of convictions. Scheduled examination. K. Stith.

    Note: LLM and MSL students must have the instructor's permission to enroll in the course to ensure that they have adequate background.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Tue)
    SLB - 129 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10096
    Exam: 12/18/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20061-01
    • Criminal Law and Administration
    • Whitman
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • Criminal Law & Administration
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Law and Administration (20061). 4 units. An introduction to criminal law and its administration, including the requisites of criminal responsibility, the defenses to liability, inchoate and group crimes, sentencing, and the roles of legislature, prosecutor, judge, and jury. This course is given in several sections; it must be taken before graduation. Students may satisfy the graduation requirement by satisfactorily completing Criminal Law and Administration or Criminal Law, but they may not enroll in both courses. Self-scheduled examination. J.Q. Whitman.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Mon)
    SLB - 120 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10101
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.5 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20037-01
    • Employment Discrimination Law
    • Schultz
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Employment Discrimination Law (20037). 4 units. This course will examine the regulation of employment discrimination through Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of l964 and related laws. It is an introductory, but comprehensive course that emphasizes the major analytical frameworks for conceptualizing race and sex discrimination--and equality--in the workplace. The course will combine a pragmatic, litigation-oriented perspective with a theoretical, sociological one, as it investigates the assumptions underlying various legal approaches and situates legal trends within larger social and historical contexts. The course will provide a solid theoretical foundation for understanding differing conceptions of discrimination and equality in other areas of law, such as anti-discrimination law and constitutional law. It will also provide students with the background necessary to deal with discrimination problems in a clerkship or practice setting. Scheduled examination. V. Schultz.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10106
    Exam: 12/20/2015 at 1:00 PM SLB: 129
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 5 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20366-01
    • Federal and State Courts in a Federal System
    • Resnik
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal and State Courts in a Federal System (20366). 4 units. The “Federal Courts” play a central role in today’s political debates. The class will focus on the development of the identity, doctrine, and jurisprudence of the federal courts in relation to state courts and to the other branches of the federal government. To do so, the class will consider the degree to which the U.S. Constitution allocates authority among the branches of the federal government and among state, federal, and tribal courts. Questions of the meaning of national and of state “sovereignty” lace the materials. Beneath the sometimes dry discussions of jurisdictional rules and doctrines of comity lie conflicts about such issues as race, religion, the beginning and end of life, abortion, Indian tribal rights, and gender equality. In addition to considering the political and historical context of the doctrinal developments, the class will examine the institutional structures that have evolved in the federal courts, theories of federalism, current questions about the size and shape of the federal courts, the different methods for judicial selection and kinds of state and federal judges, as well as the effects of social and demographic categories on the processes of federal adjudication. On occasion, the class will also occasionally consider concepts of federalism comparatively. Class participation will be part of the final grade. No credit/fail option. Enrollment capped at seventy-five. Self-scheduled examination. J. Resnik.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Wed)
    SLB - 129 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10086
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 8.5 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20222-01
    • Federal Income Taxation
    • Listokin
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Wed 2:00 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal Income Taxation (20222). 4 units. An introductory course on the federal income taxation of individuals and businesses. The course will provide an overview of the basic legal doctrine and will emphasize statutory interpretation and a variety of income tax policy issues. The class will consider the role of the courts, the Congress, and the IRS in making tax law and tax policy and will apply (and question) the traditional tax policy criteria of fairness, efficiency, and administrability. Topics will include fringe benefits, business expenses, the interest deduction, the taxation of the family, and capital gains. No prerequisites. No preference given to third-year students. Enrollment capped at ninety. Scheduled examination. Y. Listokin.

    Note: TheThursday meeting times on the schedule are for make-up classes. Professor Listokin will announce the exact dates those meeting times will be used at the beginning of the term.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Thu)
    SLB - 122 (Wed)
    SLB - 122 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10076
    Exam: 12/15/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20545-01
    • †International Law and Foreign Relations: Seminar
    • Hathaway
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Skills
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    †International Law and Foreign Relations: Seminar (20545). 4 units. This course will offer an opportunity to study, research, and participate in current legal debates over international law and foreign relations law. Students will work on research topics selected by the instructor and the class from among those presented by U.S. congressional staff, executive branch lawyers, or nonprofit groups working on issues relating to international law or foreign relations. Research projects may also be generated by the class itself. In past years, the seminar has researched topics including the law of cyber-attack, the power of the U.S. government to detain terrorism suspects, the scope of the Treaty Power, the relationship between human rights law and the law of armed conflict, extraterritorial application of human rights obligations, the law governing the U.S. targeted killing program, and the legal requirements of various human rights treaties. The seminar has also submitted amicus briefs to the D.C. Circuit and U.S. Supreme Court. Students will work both individually and in small groups to write reports on selected topics and, as appropriate, produce recommendations for reform. Weekly class meetings provide an opportunity for students to present and discuss their ongoing research. Students will also have an opportunity to meet with attorneys and policymakers who are directly involved in the legal debates on which the class is working. Substantial Paper credit is available. Enrollment limited to eight. O. Hathaway.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a short statement of interest and a CV through the bidding system by June 25, 4:30 p.m. Listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections constitutes authorization for the instructor to review the student's Law School transcript.

    Note: First-day attendance is required.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10064

    Close
    • 20104-01
    • Justice
    • Ackerman
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Justice (20104). 4 units. An examination of contemporary theories, together with an effort to assess their practical implications. Authors this year will include Peter Singer, Richard Posner, John Rawls, Robert Nozick, Michael Walzer, Marian Young, and Roberto Unger. Topics: animal rights, the status of children and the principles of educational policy, the relation of market justice to distributive justice, the status of affirmative action. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also PLSC 553a/PHIL 718a. B. Ackerman.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Mon)
    SLB - 122 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10038
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 48 hour(s)

    Close
    • 30173-01
    • *†Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic
    • Silk
      Metcalf
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    *†Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30173). 4 units, credit/fail. Students will work on a variety of human rights projects, generally in support of advocacy efforts of human rights organizations. Projects are designed to give students practical experience with the range of activities in which lawyers engage to promote respect for human rights; to help students build the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective human rights lawyers; and to integrate the theory and practice of human rights. Class sessions will include an overview of basic human rights standards and their application; instruction in human rights research and writing skills; and critical examination of approaches to human rights advocacy and enforcement. The clinic will have one or more student directors. Enrollment limited to eighteen. Permission of the instructors required. J.J. Silk and H.R. Metcalf.

    Course Bidding Information: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students interested in applying for the Lowenstein Clinic should submit a resume and a short statement of interest to barbara.mianzo@yale.edu no later than 4:30 p.m. on June 25. The statement should be no longer than one single-spaced page. It should primarily explain why you are interested in participating in the Clinic and should also include a brief summary of any experiences (employment, classes, volunteer activities) that would be relevant to international human rights work. Please indicate any foreign language ability. LL.M. students are eligible for the clinic but should consult with the instructor before enrolling.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    SLB - 110 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10170

    Close
    • 12001-A
    • Procedure I
    • Gluck
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 127 (Wed)
    SLB - 127 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12790
    Exam: 12/16/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 12001-B
    • Procedure I
    • Koh
    • Mon 8:20 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:20 AM-10:00 AM
      Fri 8:20 AM-10:00 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Wed)
    SLB - 129 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12791
    Exam: 12/16/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 129
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Name
    Length: 3.25 hour(s)

    Close
    • 12001-C
    • Procedure I
    • Schleicher
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 120 (Mon)
    SLB - 120 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12792
    Exam: 12/16/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 120
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.25 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20377-01
    • Property
    • Ellickson
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Property (20377). 4 units. Law and informal norms combine to create the bedrock institutions that govern human entitlements in scarce resources. Land will be a principal focus of the course, but attention also will be given to other resources, such as wild animals, labor, water, the electromagnetic spectrum, and intellectual property. A regime of private property in a particular resource will be compared to alternative regimes such as communal, open-access, and state-owned property. At maximum, a private owner of a resource has a right to exclude, a privilege of use, and a power of transfer. The many legal limitations on these powers, such as public accommodations laws, will be explored. The course will address the temporal division of property interests, co-ownership arrangements, and ownership by a managing entity such as a landlord or trust. Toward the end of the term, urban and public-law issues will take center stage. Topics will include housing policy, the constitutional rights of property owners, and the regulation of land uses through nuisance law, easements and covenants, and municipal zoning. Scheduled examination. R.C. Ellickson.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10048
    Exam: 12/20/2015 at 1:00 PM SLB: 127
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.5 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20499-01
    • Remedies
    • Parrillo
    • Tue 2:05 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:05 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Remedies (20499). 4 units. You've won the case. But what do you actually get? This course is about what courts do (and do not do) for litigants who have been found to be the victims of legal wrong. Though we will give some attention to every basic category of relief -- damages, restitution, declaratory judgments, and injunctions -- our main focus will be on remedies that plaintiffs seek in litigating against government entities (federal, state, and local). In particular we will consider the successes and failures of judicial remedies as a means to influence and reform the behavior of complex public organizations. Highlights include structural reform injunctions, agencies' refusals to acquiesce in judicial rulings, and the contempt power, including the willingness (or unwillingness) of judges to use that power against public officials. Self-scheduled examination. N. Parrillo.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10087
    Exam: 12/14/2015 - 12/22/2015
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 13001-01
    • Torts I
    • Grewal
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: ASH40 - A420 (Tue)
    ASH40 - A420 (Thu)
    ASH40 - A422 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12795
    Exam: 12/14/2015 at 2:00 PM SLB: 122
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 13001-02
    • Torts I
    • Kohler-Hausmann
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Wed 5:10 PM-7:00 PM
      Thu 5:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    SLB - 112 (Wed)
    SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12797

    Close
    • 13001-03
    • Torts I
    • Witt
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 5:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    SLB - 110 (Thu)
    SLB - 124 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12799
    Exam: 12/14/2015 at 2:00 PM SLB: 129
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 13001-A
    • Torts I
    • Calabresi
    • Mon 8:45 AM-10:00 AM
      Tue 8:45 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:45 AM-10:00 AM
      Thu 8:45 AM-10:00 AM
      Fri 8:45 AM-10:00 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 127 (Mon)
    SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12793
    Exam: 12/14/2015 at 2:00 PM SLB: 120
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 13001-B
    • Torts I
    • Kysar
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12794
    Exam: 12/14/2015 at 2:00 PM SLB: 127
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20096-01
    • Trusts and Estates
    • Langbein
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Trusts and Estates (20096). 4 units. An introductory course treating the various means of gratuitous transfer of wealth by will, by lifetime transfers, and by intestacy: (1) the policy bases of inheritance and the changing patterns of intergenerational wealth transfer; (2) probate administration and procedure; (3) guardianship and custodial regimes for minors and for the infirm; (4) health-care decision making and the “right to die”; (5) intestate succession; (6) the common will substitutes: gift, joint account, joint tenancy, life insurance, pension account, revocable trust; (7) spousal protection and community property; (8) the growing federal interference, especially ERISA preemption; (9) capacity problems and will contests; (10) the requirements for executing and revoking wills; (11) distinctive constructional doctrines of the law of gratuitous transfers; (12) the creation and termination of trusts; (13) the duties of trustees, executors, and other fiduciaries; (14) trust investment law; (15) charitable trusts and charitable corporations; and (16) basic features of federal and state transfer and inheritance taxation. Throughout the course the relevant portions of the Uniform Probate Code, the Uniform Trust Code, and the Restatements (Third) of Trusts and Property will be studied. Scheduled examination. J.H. Langbein.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10070
    Exam: 12/17/2015 at 9:00 AM SLB: 127
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.5 hour(s)

    Close