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Courses: Fall 2017 Expand

    • 20170-01
    • Administrative Law
    • Mashaw
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Administrative Law (20170). 4 units. This course will review the legal and practical foundations of the modern administrative state. Topics will include the creation of administrative agencies and the non-delegation doctrine, the internal process of adjudication and rulemaking in administrative agencies, judicial review of administrative action, the organization of the executive branch, liability for official misconduct, and beneficiary enforcement of public law. Scheduled examination. J.L. Mashaw.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Wed)
    SLB - 121 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10022
    Exam: 12/11/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

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    • 20344-01
    • Administrative Law: Advanced Topics
    • Parrillo
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Administrative Law: Advanced Topics (20344). 2 units. This seminar is a “pilot” for a large-classroom course in advanced administrative law that the instructor plans to offer in a future academic year. It will cover matters of doctrine, professional craft, and organizational behavior that arise when lawyers seek to influence, negotiate with, litigate against, or defend federal agencies. The seminar’s topics build upon the foundational course in Administrative Law but are not covered there due to limited time. Coverage will likely include: agency investigations and enforcement; the Freedom of Information Act and its uses and pathologies; remedies against agencies, as well as agency refusals to acquiesce in judicial precedent; the means by which the government can sign away some of its policymaking authority through consent decrees; damage actions against federal agencies and officials, including how the judgment fund and indemnification blunt their effects; means of influencing the “front end” of an agency rulemaking before policy becomes set in stone (including advisory committees); the art of seeking guidance from agencies; the importance of reputations and long-term relationships in the interactions between officials, regulated entities, and their attorneys; and the unique aspects of practicing law as a representative of the government. Students are required to participate actively in each week’s discussion. Grades will be based solely on class participation. Prerequisite: Administrative Law or Introduction to the Regulatory State (or similar preparation). Enrollment limited to eight. N. Parrillo.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 12892

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    • 20508-01
    • Advanced Deals Workshop: Public Company M&A
    • Robinson
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:30 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills
    • faculty permission
    • exam required
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    Advanced Deals Workshop: Public Company M&A (20508). 3 units. This course will be an advanced deals workshop focusing on the practical and legal issues that corporate lawyers face in structuring and negotiating merger and acquisition transactions involving public companies, as well as planning and defending against hostile takeovers. Topics will include understanding the roles of corporate lawyers and other players in M&A transactions, structuring deals, drafting and negotiating merger agreements to allocate risk and protect the deal, designing and implementing corporate takeover defenses including litigation strategies, planning hostile takeovers, managing conflict transactions including squeeze-outs and leveraged buyouts, and responding to shareholder activists and hedge funds. Prerequisite: Business Organizations or equivalent. Permission of the instructor required. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to fourteen. Self-scheduled examination. E. S. Robinson.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a copy of their CV by the end of the pre-registration period on June 22. Listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of the student's YLS transcript to the instructor.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10137
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id

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    • 30210-01
    • Advanced Rule of Law Clinic: Seminar
    • Wishnie
      Metcalf
      Spector
    • Tue 4:30 PM-5:30 PM
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Rule of Law Clinic: Seminar (30210). 1 unit, credit/fail. Students who enroll in this seminar must also be enrolled in Advanced Rule of Law Clinic: Fieldwork. Open only to students who have completed Rule of Law Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, H.R. Metcalf, P. Spector.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students who bid on the seminar should list it as their lowest choice among experiential course selections. Those who are accepted in the seminar will automatically be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 13087

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    • 30181-01
    • Advanced Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic
    • Greenhouse
      Pincus
      Rothfeld
      Kimberly
      Hughes
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Supreme Court Advocacy (30181). 4 units (2 fall, 2 spring). Open only to students who completed Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. L. Greenhouse, P. Hughes, M. Kimberly, A. Pincus, and C. Rothfeld.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest choice among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10015

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    • 30129-01
    • Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Seminar
    • Ahmad
      Wishnie
      Orihuela
      Loyo
    • Thu 2:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Seminar (30129). 1 unit, credit/fail. A weekly seminar session only for returning students. Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork is a co-requisite. Students enrolled in the seminar section must also be enrolled in the fieldwork section. Prerequisite: Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.I. Ahmad, M.J. Wishnie, R. Loyo, and M. Orihuela.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections. Students who are accepted in the seminar will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10044

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    • 30132-01
    • Advanced Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
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    Advanced Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork (30132). 1 to 3 units. Open only to students who have completed the Community and Economic Development Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar and C.F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest preference among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10021

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    • 30104-01
    • Advanced Community and Economic Development Clinic: Seminar
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Community and Economic Development Clinic: Seminar (30104) and Fieldwork (30132). The seminar is 1 unit, credit/fail; the fieldwork section is 1-3 units, graded. Open only to students who have completed the Community and Economic Development Clinic.Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar and C.F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest preference among experiential course selections Students who elect both the seminar and the fieldwork options should list each as their two lowest preferences.

    Note: The seminar meeting time will be determined once students' schedules have been settled and a coordinated time can be arranged.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; or Temporary Restraining Order Project.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10020

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    • 30111-01
    • Advanced Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic
    • Forman
      Shaffer
      Gohara
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
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    Advanced Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic (30111). 4 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option. Open only to students who have completed the Educational Opportunity and Juvenile Justice Clinic and were enrolled in the Advanced EOJJ Clinic in Spring 2017. Enrollment limited to two. Permission of the instructors required. J. Forman, M. Gohara, and E. Shaffer.

    Note: The instructor will coordinate a weekly meeting time once students have their schedules set.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should use their lowest priority among experiential course selections. No new students will be accepted for the fall term.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10013

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    • 30167-01
    • Advanced Ethics Bureau at Yale
    • Fox
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Ethics Bureau (30167). 3 units. This course is for students who have already taken either the Ethics Bureau at Yale clinic or a course in professional responsibility, and who wish to contribute further to the work of the Bureau. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. L. Fox.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - K290A (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10131

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    • 20486-01
    • Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources
    • Krishnaswami
      Harrison
    • Tue 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Thu 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources (20486). 2 or 3 units. An advanced exploration of the specialized methods and sources of legal research in some of the following areas: secondary legal authority, case law, statutory authority, legislative history, court rules and practice materials, and administrative law. The course will also cover the legal research process, and tracking research as well as other strategies for efficient and effective legal research. Class sessions will integrate the use of online, print, and other research sources to solve legal research problems. Laptop computer recommended. Students are required to complete a series of assignments, in addition to the other course requirements. Students who wish to qualify for a third unit will need to write a paper, in addition to other course requirements.

    Notes about 20486-01: This section will have an enrollment cap of twenty-five. Students must attend the first meeting to maintain their place in the course or on the waiting list. The instructors for this section are J. Krishnaswami and R.D. Harrison.

    Notes about 20486-02: This section will have an enrollment cap of forty. Students must attend the first meeting to maintain their place in the course or on the waiting list. The instructors for this section are J. Jefferson, S. Stein, and R.D. Harrison.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Tue)
    SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10225

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    • 20486-02
    • Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources
    • Jefferson
      Harrison
      Stein
    • Tue 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
      Thu 8:35 AM-10:00 AM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Research: Methods and Sources (20486). 2 or 3 units. An advanced exploration of the specialized methods and sources of legal research in some of the following areas: secondary legal authority, case law, statutory authority, legislative history, court rules and practice materials, and administrative law. The course will also cover the legal research process, and tracking research as well as other strategies for efficient and effective legal research. Class sessions will integrate the use of online, print, and other research sources to solve legal research problems. Laptop computer recommended. Students are required to complete a series of assignments, in addition to the other course requirements. Students who wish to qualify for a third unit will need to write a paper, in addition to other course requirements.

    Notes about 20486-01: This section will have an enrollment cap of twenty-five. Students must attend the first meeting to maintain their place in the course or on the waiting list. The instructors for this section are J. Krishnaswami and R.D. Harrison.

    Notes about 20486-02: This section will have an enrollment cap of forty. Students must attend the first meeting to maintain their place in the course or on the waiting list. The instructors for this section are J. Jefferson, S. Stein, and R.D. Harrison.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Tue)
    SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10226

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    • 20032-01
    • Advanced Legal Writing
    • Harrison
    • Tue 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:35 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2 to 3
    • Professional Skills
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
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    Advanced Legal Writing (20032). 2 or 3 units. This course will provide the theory and practice of drafting legal memoranda and briefs. Students will have the opportunity to refine analytical as well as writing skills. For two units, students will complete two drafts of a legal memo, and a brief-revision exercise. To qualify for an additional unit, students will write a second memo that will require them to apply the law to a complicated and disputed set of facts. The goal of the course will be to take students beyond basic competence to excellence in legal writing. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to ten. R.D. Harrison.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10147

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    • 30176-01
    • Advanced Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic
    • Schulz
      Balkin
      Langford
      Bloch-Wehba
    • 1 to 4
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic (30176). 1 to 4 units, credit/fail or graded at student option. Prerequisite: Open only to students who have completed two semesters of the Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. D. Schulz, J.M. Balkin, H. Bloch-Wehba, J.T. Langford

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students.

    Course Bidding: Students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10067

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    • 30149-01
    • Advanced Sentencing Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Doherty
      Ullmann
      Gohara
      Orihuela
    • 2
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Sentencing Clinic: Fieldwork (30149). 2 units. This clinic will provide students who have completed Criminal Justice Clinic (CJC) or Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic (CMIC) an opportunity to participate in a course featuring a one-credit seminar and two-credit fieldwork component. The seminar will provide students an opportunity to deepen their study of Connecticut and federal sentencing law, policy, and practice. The fieldwork is designed to build on the written and oral advocacy skills students have developed in CJC and CMIC. Students will handle cases involving a combination of state appellate litigation, a Connecticut parole policy reform project, and federal supervised release revocation hearings. The fieldwork and seminar components must be taken simultaneously, unless there is instructor permission for a different arrangement. Open only to students who have taken either the Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic or the Criminal Justice Clinic. Enrollment limited to ten. Permission of the instructors required. F.M. Doherty, M. Gohara, M. Orihuela, and T. Ullmann.

    Course Bidding:Students who are accepted in the seminar section will be automatically enrolled in the fieldwork section unless the instructors notify the Registrar's Office that a different arrangement has been made. It is not necessary to bid on the fieldwork section unless you have been approved to enroll only in fieldwork.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10146

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    • 30148-01
    • Advanced Sentencing Clinic
    • Doherty
      Ullmann
      Gohara
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Sentencing Clinic: Seminar (30148). 1 unit. This clinic will provide students who have completed Criminal Justice Clinic (CJC) or Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic(CMIC) an opportunity to participate in a course featuring a one-credit seminar and two-credit fieldwork component. The seminar will provide students an opportunity to deepen their study of Connecticut and federal sentencing law, policy, and practice. The fieldwork is designed to build on the written and oral advocacy skills students have developed in CJC and CMIC. Students will handle cases involving a combination of state appellate litigation, a Connecticut parole policy reform project, and federal supervised release revocation hearings. The fieldwork and seminar components must be taken simultaneously, unless there is instructor permission for a different arrangement. Open only to students who have taken either the Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic or the Criminal Justice Clinic. Enrollment limited to ten. Permission of the instructors required. F.M Doherty, M. Gohara, and T. Ullmann.

    Course Bidding:

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10145

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    • 30179-01
    • Advanced San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project
    • Gerken
      Kwon
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 1 to 4
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced SFALP (30179). 1 to 4 units, graded, with a credit/fail option. Open only to those students who have completed Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project. Permission of the instructors required. H. Gerken and C. Kwon.

    Note: No drops will be permitted after the first class meeting.

    Course Selection: Continuing students should list this section as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10064

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    • 30126-01
    • Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Wishnie
      Wenzloff
      Lado
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Fieldwork (30126). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. Students may enroll in the fieldwork section without enrolling in the seminar section. Prerequisite: Veterans Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, M. Engleman Lado, and A. Wenzloff.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10041

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    • 30125-01
    • Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Seminar
    • Wishnie
      Wenzloff
      Lado
    • Mon 1:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Seminar (30125). 1 unit, credit/fail. A weekly seminar session only for returning students. Advanced VLSC: Fieldwork is a co-requisite; students enrolled in the seminar must also be enrolled in the fieldwork section. Prerequisite: Veterans Legal Services Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, M. Engleman Lado, and A. Wenzloff.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections. Students who are accepted in the seminar section will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10040

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    • 30130-01
    • Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Ahmad
      Wishnie
      Orihuela
      Loyo
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Fieldwork (30130). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. Students may elect to take the fieldwork section without enrolling in the advanced seminar section.Prerequisite: Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. M.I. Ahmad, M.J. Wishnie, R. Loyo, and M. Orihuela.

    Course Bidding: Returning students should list this clinic as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10061

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    • 30218-01
    • Advanced Written Advocacy
    • Messing
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Written Advocacy (30218). 3 units. This seminar will train students to advocate for their clients more effectively. To improve students' strategic writing, we will scrutinize excellent trial motions and appellate briefs to see how top practitioners tell their clients' stories, organize and build legal arguments, and advance their clients' strategic interests. We will also review numerous other types of litigation-related documents, including letters, memoranda, and complaints. Although the course will provide a fair amount of instruction about the stylistic side of "legal writing," it will focus on advocacy's more substantive, strategic facets. Students will prepare several assignments, at least one of which will be prepared as part of a team. N. Messing.

    Course Selection: This course does not require permission of the instructor, so students should list it as their lowest preference among experiential course selections.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10158

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    • 30206-01
    • Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic: Fieldwork: PracticeIntersectionCivRtsEnvironmentalLaw
    • Lado
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic: Fieldwork: Practice and the Intersection of Civil Rights and Environmental Law (30206). 1 to 4 units. Students will have the opportunity to continue the development of Yale Law School’s new Environmental Justice Clinic and to develop a docket to improve environmental quality and public health in communities of color and low-income communities. In the wake of a national conversation about the water crisis in Flint and lead poisoning across the country, students will continue to be in on the ground floor as the Clinic represents clients challenging inequality in the distribution of health hazards as well as procedural inequities they face as they seek to assert their own vision for the future of their neighborhoods, towns and cities. The Clinic’s work includes cases and advocacy projects to enforce civil rights in the environmental context and to address issues of environmental injustice in particular communities.

    Students will work in teams under faculty supervision and take responsibility for litigation and advocacy. Their activities will include the following:
    • Working directly with clients, co-counsel, opposing counsel, allies, environmental agencies, and EPA;
    • Developing case records by conducting factual investigation and working with experts;
    • Legal analysis, memos, pleadings and drafting other legal documents (such as public disclosure requests, comments on federal rules, etc.);
    • Representation of clients;
    • Negotiations and settlement;
    • Developing the Clinic’s intake and referral system, communications capacity, and outreach effort.

    In addition to civil rights compliance and enforcement in the environmental context, the Clinic will evaluate potential litigation and advocacy to address the sources and impacts of air and water contamination in disproportionately affected communities, with a focus on communities in Connecticut.

    Students may also participate in an Advanced Seminar intended to continue exploring issues raised by the clinical practice, including both substantive issues of environmental and civil rights law, as well as questions related to practice, including ethical and social dimensions of lawyering in this context. The seminar will meet approximately one hour per week. Advanced Fieldwork participants must complete and document hours of clinical work per week commensurate with their credit hours. Students will also be expected to participate in weekly one-half hour team meetings. Previous participation in the EJ Clinic is a prerequisite for Advanced Fieldwork. Permission of the instructor required. Also F&ES. M.E. Lado.

    Course Bidding: Open only to students who completed the Spring clinic. In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, previous EJ Clinic students should submit a short statement expressing continued interest in the clinic to marianne.engelman-lado@yale.edu by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. Students may also upload a copy of their statement to YLS: Courses by the close of the bidding period.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10127

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    • 30200-01
    • Advanced Appellate Litigation Project
    • Duke
      Daniels
      Dooley
    • Thu 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Appellate Litigation Project (30200). 5 units (3 fall, 2 spring), graded . Students in the Advanced Appellate Litigation Project will represent pro se clients before the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. Under the supervision of Yale faculty and attorneys from the appellate group at Wiggin and Dana, teams of three students will work on cases referred through the Pro Bono Counsel Plan for the Second Circuit. This program provides legal representation to pro se appellants with meritorious civil cases pending before the court. The issues raised in these cases may include immigration, employment discrimination, prisoners’ civil rights, and other section 1983 claims. Students will take primary responsibility for drafting the briefs in their assigned case, and one of them will deliver oral argument before the Second Circuit. Through the instructional portion of the clinic, students will learn principles of appellate law and practice, including concepts such as standard of review, preservation of issues, and understanding the appellate record. Students will also receive instruction in brief writing and oral advocacy. Due to the briefing and argument schedule for a civil appellate case, this is a two-term offering. This course is not open to MSL students. Enrollment will be limited to six or nine students depending on case assignments. Permission of instructors required. S.B. Duke, B. Daniels, and T. Dooley.

    Nature of Credits: The credits for this course can qualify as either "professional responsibility" or "experiential" but not as both for the same credits. Each student may elect which of those characterizations may be allocated to each course credit. If no election is make to the Registrar before the end of the term in which the student is enrolled in the course, all credits shall be presumed to be "experiential."

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this project among experiential course selections, students should also submit (1) a resume; (2) a one-page statement of interest, and (3) a writing sample (preferably a brief). The writing sample should be substantially the work of the student and may only have minor third-party edits. Listing this clinic among experiential course selections constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of the student's Law School transcript to the instructors. Applications should be submitted to steven.duke@yale.edu and uploaded into the bidding system by the close of the bidding period on June 22 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10108

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    • 30145-01
    • Advanced Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Seminar
    • Gohara
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Seminar (30145). 1 unit. Open only to J.D. students who have completed the Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Seminar and Fieldwork. The advanced seminar and fieldwork sections must be taken simultaneously. Enrollment limited to five. Permission of the instructor required. M. Gohara.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list the seminar section (Law 30145) as their lowest priority among experiential course selections. It is not necessary to list the fieldwork section among these selections; students who are accepted in the seminar will automatically be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students will be asked to confirm their place in the clinic before classes begin. There is a no-drop policy thereafter.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10011

    Close
    • 30146-01
    • Advanced Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Gohara
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Fieldwork (30146). 2 units. Open only to J.D. students who have completed the Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic (seminar and fieldwork). The advanced sections must be taken simultaneously. Enrollment limited to five. Permission of the instructor required. M. Gohara.

    Course Bidding: Bid only on the seminar section of the advanced clinic (LAW 30145);students who are accepted in the seminar will be automatically enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: There is a no-drop policy for those accepted in this clinic.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10012

    Close
    • 30108-01
    • Advanced Criminal Justice Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Doherty
      Bruce
    • 1 or 2
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Criminal Justice Clinic: Fieldwork (30108). 1 or 2 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. Prerequisite: Criminal Justice Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. F.M. Doherty and S. Bruce III.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10157

    Close
    • 30165-01
    • Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic
    • Galperin
      Suatoni
      Hawkins
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic (30165). 1 to 4 units. Open only to students who have successfully completed the Environmental Protection Clinic. Students who complete this section for two or more units may satisfy the Professional Responsibility or Legal Skills requirement. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited. J. Galperin, D. Hawkins, and L. Suatoni.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10258

    Close
    • 30205-01
    • Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic: Seminar:Practice at IntersectionCivilRights&EnvironmentLaw
    • Lado
    • Wed 10:10 AM-11:00 AM
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Environmental Protection Clinic: Seminar: Practice at the Intersection of Civil Rights and Environmental Law (30205). 1 unit, credit/fail. Students participating in Environmental Protection Clinic - Advanced Fieldwork can participate in the Advanced Seminar, which is intended to dive into issues raised by the clinical practice, including both substantive issues of environmental and civil rights law, as well as questions related to practice, including ethical and social dimensions of lawyering in the environmental justice context. The seminar will meet approximately one hour per week and will be student organized. Also F&ES. M.E. Lado.

    Course Bidding: Open only to students continuing from the Spring clinic. Continuing students should list this clinical seminar, and the advanced fieldwork section, if they are taking both, as their lowest priorities among experiential course selections.

    Note: First-day attendance is required unless permission for absence is granted by the instructor in advance of the first meeting.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10126

    Close
    • 30171-01
    • Advanced International Refugee Assistance Project
    • Heller
      Finkbeiner
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced International Refugee Assistance Project (30171). 2 or 3 units. A fieldwork-only option. Prerequisite: International Refugee Assistance Project. Permission of the instructors required. R. Heller and L. Finkbeiner.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10218

    Close
    • 30202-01
    • Advanced Legal Assistance: Reentry Clinic
    • Eppler-Epstein
      Shaffer
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Assistance Reentry Clinic (30202). 1 to 4 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. Open only to students who have completed the Legal Assistance Reentry Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. A. Eppler-Epstein and E. Shaffer.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 13198

    Close
    • 30203-01
    • Advanced Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic Fieldwork
    • Bhandary-Alexander
      Blank
    • 1 to 4
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Assistance Clinic: Immigrant Rights: Fieldwork (30203). 1 to 4 units, credit/fail with graded option at student's choice. Open only to students who have completed Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic. Open only to JD students. Permission of the instructors required. J. Bhandary-Alexander and D. Blank.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as their lowest priority among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10286

    Close
    • 30208-01
    • Advanced Legal Assistance: Domestic Violence Clinic
    • Frontis
      Messali
    • 1 to 4
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Legal Assistance: Domestic Violence Clinic (30208). 1 to 4 units. Open only to students who have completed Legal Assistance: Domestic Violence Clinic. Permission of the instructors required. C. Frontis and E. Messali.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this clinic as their lowest bid among experiential course selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10262

    Close
    • 30174-01
    • Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic
    • Silk
      Bjerregaard
      Metcalf
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3 or 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30174). 3 or 4 units. Open only to students who have completed the Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic. Permission of the instructor required. J.J. Silk and H.R. Metcalf.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this course as the lowest bid among experiential course selections. In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students wishing to enroll in the advanced clinic must submit (1) a brief statement (less than 250 words) of the goals they would like to achieve in the Clinic during the semester and (2) a list of all significant commitments, including extracurricular activities, externships, work, and other clinics, during the semester. These materials should be submitted through the bidding system by 4:30 p.m. on June 22.

    Note: Students may not drop the Advanced Lowenstein Clinic after the first day of the semester.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10165

    Close
    • 30231-01
    • Advanced Reproductive Rights and Justice Project: Fieldwork
    • Smith
      Kraschel
    • 1 to 3
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Reproductive Rights and Justice Project: Fieldwork (30231). 1 to 3 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. Students may enroll in the fieldwork section without enrolling in the seminar section. Prerequisite: Reproductive Rights and Justice Project. Permission of the instructors required. P.J. Smith and K. Kraschel.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list the fieldwork section as their lowest rank among experiential course selections.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 12459

    Close
    • 30230-01
    • Advanced Reproductive Rights and Justice Project: Seminar
    • Smith
      Kraschel
    • Wed 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Reproductive Rights and Justice Project: Seminar (30230). 1 unit, credit/fail. A weekly hour-long seminar only for returning students who are also enrolled in Advanced RRJP: Fieldwork. This seminar is student organized with an instructor in attendance. Prerequisite: Reproductive Rights and Justice Project. Permission of the instructors required. P.J. Smith and K. Kraschel.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list this seminar as their lowest rank among experiential course bids.

    Location: SLB - K290A (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12458

    Close
    • 30209-01
    • Advanced Rule of Law Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Wishnie
      Koh
      Metcalf
      Spector
    • 2
    • -
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Advanced Rule of Law Clinic: Fieldwork (30209). 2 units, graded at student option. Open only to students who have completed Rule of Law Clinic.. Permission of the instructors required. H.H. Koh, M.J. Wishnie, H.R. Metcalf, and P. Spector.

    Course Bidding: Continuing students should list the fieldwork section as their lowest choice among experiential course selections.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 13088

    Close
    • 20661-01
    • American Leadership and Global Order
    • Gewirtz
      Sullivan
    • Mon 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    American Leadership and Global Order (20661). 2 units. This course will examine the policy and legal challenges of updating international norms, institutions, and relationships to reflect the realities of the contemporary global landscape while continuing to advance U.S. leadership. It will start from the premise that the global order the United States helped build at the end of the Second World War needs serious renovation, and the U.S. needs to lead that renovation: to improve collective capacity to manage threats; to mobilize action to address shared challenges; and especially to shape updated rules of the road that govern interstate and transnational conduct in key areas. The course will focus on some of these key areas -- nonproliferation, climate change, trade and economics, human rights, maritime and territorial disputes -- and assess the policy and legal options available to U.S. national security decision makers. Readings will be largely contemporary. The class will meet for seven weeks during the first part of the term. Thereafter there will be direct supervision of paper topics. Paper required. Enrollment limited to eighteen Law students. Permission of the instructor required. P. Gewirtz and J. Sullivan.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10227

    Close
    • 20054-01
    • Animal Law
    • Kysar
      Lovvorn
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Animal Law (20054). 2 or 3 units. This course will examine the application of the law to non-human animals, the rules and regulations that govern their treatment, and the concepts of "animal welfare" and "animal rights." The course will explore the historical and philosophical treatment of animals, discuss how such treatment impacts the way judges, politicians, lawyers, legal scholars and lay people see, speak about, and use animals; survey current animal protection laws and regulations, including overlap with such policy issues as food and agriculture, climate change, and biodiversity protection; describe recent political and legal campaigns to reform animal protection laws; examine the concept of "standing" and the problems of litigating on behalf of animals; discuss the current classification of animals as "property" and the impacts of that classification, and debate the merits and limitations of alternative classifications, such as the recognition of "legal rights" for animals. Students will write a series of short response papers. An option to produce a longer research paper for Substantial or Supervised Analytic Writing credit will be available. Enrollment limited to forty. D. Kysar and J. Lovvorn.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10017

    Close
    • 20629-01
    • Antitrust Law
    • Melamed
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Antitrust Law (20629). 4 units. This course will provide an introduction to U.S. antitrust law, which is the basic federal law governing business competition, and the economic analysis relevant to understanding it. The course will focus on the three categories of conduct that can impair competition: agreements among competitors, conduct that excludes or weakens competitors, and mergers among firms. It will examine both important cases that set forth current antitrust doctrine and challenges presented by new commercial circumstances, including business strategies related to intellectual property, multi-sided markets, new pricing strategies, and the increasing significance of multinational markets. The course will also address the distinctive common law-like process, informed by economic analysis and legal process considerations, by which antitrust doctrine evolves. No prior knowledge of economics is required. Self-scheduled examination. D. Melamed.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Mon)
    SLB - 120 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10056
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20175-01
    • Antitrust: Directed Research
    • Priest
    • 2 to 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Antitrust: Directed Research (20175). Units to be arranged. This seminar will provide an opportunity for discussion among students interested in writing course, Substantial or Supervised Analytic Writing papers on current (or historical) antitrust topics. Paper required. G. L. Priest.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10065

    Close
    • 20406-01
    • Antitrust in Developing Countries
    • Priest
      Salomao Filho
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
      Thu 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Antitrust in Developing Countries (20406). 1 unit. This short course will address the role of antitrust law today in countries whose economies have been shaped by colonialism. There will be a particular focus on South American countries, especially Brazil, though the principles discussed will be more far-reaching. The course will be co-taught by Professor Priest and Professor Calixto Salamao of the University of Sao Paulo, a noted antitrust expert in Brazil. G. Priest and C. Salomao Filho.

    Note: This course will meet twice a week for four weeks, dates to be announced.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10066

    Close
    • 20589-01
    • Applied Corporate Finance
    • Romano
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Applied Corporate Finance (20589). 4 units. An introduction to the fundamentals of financial economics in conjunction with legal applications focusing on corporate debt contracts and equity valuation proceedings. The course will cover basic finance concepts, such as net present value, stock and bond valuation, the capital asset pricing model and option pricing. The objective is not to develop computational skills, so much as to master the application of finance theory to specific legal issues. There are no prerequisites, although familiarity with the essentials of corporate law will be assumed and a tolerance for rudimentary mathematical example and computation is advisable. Scheduled examination. R. Romano.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10028
    Exam: 12/14/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30225-01
    • Arbitration and Administrative Law Project
    • Ayres
    • 1
    • Partial Satisfaction of Skills Requirement,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Arbitration and Administrative Law Project (30225). 1 unit, credit/fail. The Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection provides residents with the option to resolve disputes regarding Connecticut’s New Car Lemon Law Program and the Lottery Delinquency Assessment process through arbitration. Training will concern the substantive dispute areas, administrative procedures, as well as rules of ethics. Students will oversee and resolve contested cases as arbitrators and hearing officers for oral hearings. The course is designed to allow students to apply Connecticut law to facts in unresolved disputes and draft and render initial decisions describing their findings of facts, conclusions of law, and any applicable orders. Enrollment limited to twenty-five. Permission of the instructor required. I. Ayres.

    Course Bidding: Interested students should submit a one-paragraph statement of interest by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. Professor Ayres plans to use these statements of interest to select course participants should the number of interested students exceed twenty-five.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10004

    Close
    • 20623-01
    • The Art of Argument: How to Write about the Law
    • Bazelon
      Caplan
    • Mon 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    [The] Art of Argument (20623). 2 units. The strong written argument is an essential aspect of effective legal advocacy. Lawyers must know how to convincingly present and marshal evidence for a client's position, in writing that is as clear and sharp as possible. Increasingly, lawyers also make use of the media to advocate for clients and causes. In the court of public opinion, it is especially important that lawyers write and speak in crisp, engaging, and persuasive terms.

    To build these skills, this class is designed to teach students how to write for a broad audience--via the op-ed page of a newspaper, a magazine, or a general-interest web site or blog, or in a book review to be published in a mainstream media outlet. The class will also discuss the ethics for lawyers of working as sources with the press, the responsibilities of lawyers to their clients in this context, and the responsibilities of journalists to their subjects and to the public. The class will take account of developments in digital journalism and in American politics that are affecting each other and changing the landscape of journalism: fake news and false charges of fake news; self-segregation through filter bubbles; hidden algorithms for searching and for identifying trending stories; and more. Students will learn (or improve on) how to use the media to educate the public and advocate for issues that are of professional interest and importance to them. Multiple short writing assignments. Enrollment limited to sixteen. Permission of the instructor required. E. Bazelon and L. Caplan.

    Note: First-day attendance is required to hold a place in the class, including for any students on the waiting list. Students on the waiting list and others interested in the course but who didn't apply in June should definitely come because spaces often come open after the first class meeting.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a short statement of interest (no more than 500 words) and a c.v. or resume by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. In addition to submitting these materials through the bidding site, students should also send them to the instructors at lincoln.caplan@yale.edu and emily.bazelon@yale.edu. In the statement, please say why you want to take the course; identify two or three legal issues you are keen to write about now for a general audience and why; briefly describe an experience you have had where you developed as a writer; and indicate what you hope to accomplish by taking the course.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10005

    Close
    • 20106-01
    • Bankruptcy
    • Schwartz
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Bankruptcy (20106). 4 units. This course will concern both business and consumer bankruptcies. It will ask: why is a federal bankruptcy procedure necessary? What normative goals should animate that procedure? When should insolvent firms be reorganized rather than liquidated? How should macro-stresses affect bankruptcy law? What is the relation between an ex post insolvency law and the ex ante investment and other behavior of firms? How can a consumer bankruptcy law best resolve the tradeoff between insurance--the discharge--and incentives--holding people to their obligations? A casebook will form the basis of the readings, and there will be considerable stress on learning the law as well as the economics of bankruptcy. Self-scheduled examination. A. Schwartz.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Tue)
    SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10151
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20571-01
    • Bioethics and Law
    • Latham
    • Wed 3:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Bioethics and Law (20571). 2 or 3 units. Participants in this seminar will discuss the regulation by the federal government and, more importantly, by the states, of a number of current issues in biomedical ethics. Topics to be discussed include end-of-life care and aid-in-dying; abortion, assisted reproduction and related family-law issues; experimentation on human subjects and on human tissues; organ recruitment, donation and transplantation; and issues relating to informed consent and privacy. We will take brief comparative looks at other countries' regulations in some areas. Students will earn 2 units for a twenty-page paper, 3 units for a longer paper. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twenty. S. Latham.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10231

    Close
    • 20219-01
    • Business Organizations
    • Macey
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Business Organizations (20219). 4 units. An introduction to the business corporation laws affecting the rights and roles of corporate boards of directors, senior executive officers, and shareholders, with attention to both large, publicly traded firms and to closely-held companies. Shareholders' economic interests are examined from the perspective of limited liability and dividend standards, expectations of liquidity or transferability of shares, and the use of debt capital as a mode of financing corporate activity. Shareholders' limited participation rights in corporate decision making will be examined from the perspective of state and federal rules governing shareholder voting and the disclosure of corporate information and the notion of managerial expertise (e.g., as evidenced by judicial application of the "business judgment rule"). The latter part of the course will focus on directors' and officers' fiduciary obligations to shareholders, examining the operation of these duties in a variety of settings and transactions. Issues relating to the roles and functions assumed by corporate attorneys (with respect to their clients) and the role of business corporations within society will also be addressed. Self-scheduled examination. J.R. Macey.

    Location: SLB - AUD (Mon)
    SLB - AUD (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10148
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30161-01
    • Capital Punishment Clinic
    • Bright
      Parrent
      Sanneh
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Capital Punishment Clinic (30161). 6 units (3 fall, 3 spring), credit/fail in the fall term with the option of graded credit in the spring. Students will gain firsthand experience in capital defense, working as part of a team representing indigent defendants facing the death penalty in cases being handled by the Southern Center for Human Rights in Atlanta or the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama. Projects and case assignments will vary according to the position of each clinic case in the process, but all projects will require legal research, analysis and writing, strategy meetings with team members, and preparation for appellate arguments and may include interviews with clients or witnesses. Students will complete at least one substantial writing assignment, such as a portion of a motion, brief, or memorandum of law. Opportunity for travel to the South to conduct research and investigation with the Southern Center for Human Rights or the Equal Justice Initiative is available but not required. Students enroll in the fall term and continue in the spring. In rare and exceptional cases, a student may be admitted for the spring term. The course is limited to students who have taken Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, Disadvantage or plan to take it in the spring term. (Students who have taken Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, Disadvantage will be given priority in admission.) Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. S.B. Bright, A. Parrent, and S. Sanneh.

    Course Bidding Information: List this course among experiential course selections. In addition, please describe briefly why you would like to take this clinic; whether you will have sufficient time to devote to the clinic; past work experience (including summer work between years of law school); and what you expect or would like to do upon graduation. In addition, please submit the paper or project you completed for Capital Punishment: Race, Poverty, Disadvantage or some other example of your legal analysis and writing. Statements must be sent directly to Professor Bright (stephen.bright@yale.edu) by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. You may also upload a second copy of your submission through the YLS:Courses bidding system.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Tue)
    SLB - 108 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10076

    Close
    • 30135-01
    • Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Seminar
    • Gohara
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic (30135) and Fieldwork (30136). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option for each part (4 units total). The clinic and the fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. For the first time in a generation, there is bipartisan reconsideration of the criminal laws and “tough-on-crime” policies that have led to the imprisonment of over two million people in the United States – what many describe as “mass incarceration.” In the clinic’s seminar, students will study the legal, social, and policy factors that contributed to the exponential rise of America’s prison population and consider alternative approaches to punishment. In the field work, students will represent clients in federal sentencing proceedings and state post-conviction cases. Students will learn advocacy strategies aimed at mitigating or ameliorating their clients’ punishment, both prospectively during sentencing and retrospectively during post-conviction proceedings. This work will include: building relationships with clients (some of whom will be incarcerated); interviewing witnesses; investigating case facts; developing case theories; working on interdisciplinary teams alongside expert witnesses; using narrative writing techniques to prepare persuasive pleadings; and developing reentry plans for clients leaving prison. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment is limited to six. Permission of the instructor required. M. Gohara.

    Course Bidding: Students should bid only on the clinic seminar (LAW 30135). Any student who is accepted in the clinic will automatically be enrolled in the fieldwork section (LAW 30136).

    Note: Accepted students will be asked to confirm their commitment to the clinic before classes begin and likely before all bidding results are released. A no-drop policy applies once students have confirmed their acceptance of a place in the clinic. First-day attendance is required.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10009

    Close
    • 30136-01
    • Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Gohara
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Challenging Mass Incarceration Clinic: Fieldwork (30136). 2 units, credit/fail with a graded option. The fieldwork section must be taken simultaneously with the clinic. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to six. Permission of the instructor required. M. Gohara.

    Course Bidding: Students accepted in the clinic will be enrolled in the fieldwork section. It is not necessary to bid on the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10010

    Close
    • 20513-01
    • Citizenship in Crisis
    • Weil
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Citizenship in Crisis (20513). 2 units. The United States today faces a “crisis of citizenship.” Just as it enjoys a reputation as the first modern state to experience popularly elected government, the U.S. is now the outlier in terms of authorizing massive disenfranchisement. Even as it continues to be one of the few nations granting automatic access to citizenship to all persons born on its soil, it is also unique among democracies in authorizing their deportation. At the same time that the Constitution proclaims privileges and immunities for its citizens, the U.S. government sometimes authorizes their targeted killing. And while the US is a country founded by refugees, it has engaged in the systematic detention of many of those who reach American borders seeking asylum. How are we to account for this gap between the country’s cherished values and their violation in practice? We begin by studying how previous generations fought against significant forms of discrimination and ultimately abolished, inter alia, gender inequality (at least the most of it) and racial exclusions in citizenship and naturalization law. We also trace the acceptance of dual citizenship, and the Supreme Court’s role in declaring denaturalization unconstitutional (the U.S. denationalized 140,000 citizens before the Supreme Court declared it unconstitutional in 1967). We will study how social mobilization movements as well as certain legal and procedural tools and strategies contributed to these victories in the fight for citizenship equality. Viewed in the light of historical developments and international examples, we will analyze current discriminatory and exclusionary practices in U.S. citizenship laws and evaluate different possible strategies to reduce and even eliminate them. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. P. Weil.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10144
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30131-01
    • Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Community and Economic Development: Fieldwork (30131). 2 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. Must be taken in conjunction with the Community and Economic Development Clinic: Seminar. Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar and C.F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in the fieldwork section, so there is no need to bid on the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; Temporary Restraining Order Project.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10019

    Close
    • 30103-01
    • Community and Economic Development Clinic: Seminar
    • Lemar
      Muckenfuss
    • Tue 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Community and Economic Development Clinic (30103) and Fieldwork (30131). 2 units, credit/fail or graded at student option, for each section (4 units total). Students must be enrolled in the seminar and fieldwork sections simultaneously. CED explores the role of lawyers and the law in building wealth and opportunity in low-income communities. The clinic focuses on issues of neighborhood revitalization, social entrepreneurship, sustainable development and financial inclusion as they relate to community and economic development. Students in CED represent and partner with community organizations, nonprofits, community development financial institutions, neighborhood associations, and small foundations. These client organizations share an interest in promoting economic opportunity and socioeconomic mobility among low- and moderate-income people.

    Students will represent clients in a range of legal matters including formation and governance of for-profit, not-for-profit and hybrid entities, negotiating and drafting contracts, developing employment and other policies, structuring real estate transactions, resolving zoning and environmental issues, providing tax advice, drafting and advocating for legislation and appearing before administrative agencies. CED engages students in client representation and policy advocacy at the local, state and federal levels. Students will gain skills in client contact, contract drafting, transactional lawyering, legal research and writing, regulatory and legislative advocacy, administrative agency contact and negotiation. The class seminar will cover federal, state and local policies affecting urban and suburban places; substantive law in tax, real estate development, and corporate governance; and transactional and regulatory lawyering skills, such as negotiating and drafting contracts. Each student will meet with faculty once a week for fieldwork supervision. The clinic is open to students from the Schools of Law, Management, Divinity, Forestry & Environmental Studies, Public Health, and Architecture with prior approval from a faculty member. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructors required. A. Singh Lemar and C.F. Muckenfuss III.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should submit a short statement of interest (not to exceed two pages). There is no ideal length for the statement of interest. It is truly a statement of interest, not one of qualifications. It is helpful to know why are are interested in CED and what you hope to gain from the clinic. If you have past experience in the type of work we do, describe it if it helps to explain your interest in the clinic. Know, however, that past experience is not a requirement. Clinic work is time-consuming and I would like to know that you plan to prioritize CED and your client work. Our clients' matters rarely map neatly onto the academic calendar, so I would also like to know whether you plan to enroll in Advanced CED in the following semester. Statements should be submitted by 4:30 p.m. on June 22.

    Note: Because client work begins immediately and is subject to professional rules including attorney-client confidentiality, this clinic is not a class that students will have the opportunity to "shop." Admitted students will receive early notice and will be required to confirm their commitment to the clinic before the opening of the add/drop period.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; Temporary Restraining Order Project.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Tue)
    SLB - M64 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10018

    Close
    • 20121-01
    • Comparative Constitutional Law: Seminar
    • Amar
      Calabresi
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Comparative Constitutional Law: Seminar (20121). 2 units. This seminar will provide a comparative perspective on American constitutional law by looking at analogous case law and institutions from other constitutional democracies including the U.K., Germany, France, Japan, India, Canada, South Africa, Australia, Indonesia, South Korea, Brazil, Italy, Israel, and the European Union. Topics will include amendment mechanisms, secession, judicial review, separation of powers, federalism, fundamental rights, equality, freedom of expression, freedom of religion, comparative procedure, property rights and economic liberties, entitlements to government aid, and guarantees of democracy. Paper required. A. R. Amar and S. G. Calabresi.

    Note: Students who are interested in this seminar only need to list this course among general open enrollment selections; there is no need otherwise to apply in advance but all interested students should plan to attend the first class meeting. The instructors will then decide who has permission to enroll.

    Location: SLB - K290A (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10114

    Close
    • 20518-01
    • Comparative Constitutional Law
    • Ackerman
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Comparative Constitutional Law (20518). 3 units. An effort to define the key concepts adequate for an evaluation of the worldwide development of liberal constitutionalism since the Second World War. Enrollment limited to twenty. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also PLSC 709a. B. Ackerman.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10030
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 48 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20410-01
    • Comparative Law
    • Whitman
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Comparative Law (20410). 4 units. An introduction to the comparative study of different legal systems. The course will focus primarily on differences between the ways that law and order are maintained, and justice pursued, in the United States, on the one hand, and in Germany and France, on the other. There will also be some attention to some non-Western traditions, such as those of China, Japan, and Islam. The overarching aim of the course will be to explore the extent to which differences in legal doctrine and legal practice reflect larger differences in social structure. With that aim in mind, the course will explore a variety of issues, among them differences in the French, German, and American concepts of "human dignity" and its protection; differences in civil and criminal procedure; differences in punishment practice; differences in the maintenance of everyday order in the streets; differences in the law of consumer protection; differences in welfare and unemployment law; and differences in the structure and regulation of business and banking enterprises. It is hoped that students will come away from the course both with some knowledge of foreign law and with a heightened sensitivity to some of the ways in which foreign societies can differ from our own. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. J.Q. Whitman.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Tue)
    SLB - 122 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10141
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20628-01
    • Constitutional Impact and Civil Rights Litigation: Strategic Approaches
    • Guttentag
    • Tue 4:10 PM-7:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Constitutional Impact and Civil Rights Litigation (20628). 2 units. This seminar will explore strategic and doctrinal issues related to the role of impact litigation to advance civil and constitutional rights in today's legal environment. The course will draw on the instructor's decades of experience litigating immigration and civil rights law reform and class action cases in federal courts nationwide as founder and director of the ACLU's national Immigrants Rights' Project, as well as recent service in the federal government as a senior advisor and legal counsel defending litigation brought against the government. The course will explore the intersection of theory and practice in the context of various civil rights issues, such as LGBT equality, police practices, immigrants' rights and other social justice matters. Topics will include ethical considerations, bringing test cases, contemporary doctrinal restrictions on standing and class actions, strategic pleading, structural reform litigation, the role of amicus briefs; suits for damages versus injunctive relief; settlement strategies and issues; coalition litigation; public advocacy and media, and the perspective of government lawyers. Guests with varying views and expertise in different areas will be invited. Students interested in applying must submit a short statement of interest (300 words maximum) to the Registrar's Office. A paper will be required and substantial writing credit may be possible for a very limited number of students. No previous courses required; familiarity with constitutional issues is assumed. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twenty. Open only to J.D. students. Permission of the instructor required. L. Guttentag.

    Note: This two-unit seminar will meet for three hours each week to allow for weeks when the instructor will be away.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students must submit a statement of interest not to exceed 300 words discussing substantive areas of interest and background in constitutional or civil rights litigation. The statement of interest must be submitted by June 22 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Attendance at the first class is required. No drops will be approved after the second class meeting.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10135

    Close
    • 10001-01
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Balkin
    • Fri 10:10 AM-11:00 AM
      Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 109 (Fri)
    SLB - 110 (Mon)
    SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10265
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)

    Close
    • 10001-02
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Gewirtz
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Fri 10:10 AM-11:00 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    SLB - 110 (Thu)
    SLB - 111 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10266
    Exam: 12/18/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 10001-03
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Kapczynski
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 124 (Fri)
    SLB - 124 (Tue)
    SLB - 124 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10267
    Exam: 12/18/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 10001-04
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Moyn
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - FAC-DINING (Mon)
    SLB - FAC-DINING (Wed)
    SLB - FAC-DINING (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10268
    Exam: 12/18/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 10001-05
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Rubenfeld
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 11:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    SLB - 124 (Wed)
    SLB - 111 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10269
    Exam: 12/18/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 10001-06
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Stith
    • Fri 11:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 109 (Fri)
    SLB - 109 (Tue)
    SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10270
    Exam: 12/18/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 4 hour(s)

    Close
    • 10001-A
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Rodriguez
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10263
    Exam: 12/18/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 6 hour(s)

    Close
    • 10001-B
    • Constitutional Law I
    • Siegel
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10264
    Exam: 12/18/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20259-01
    • Constitutional Litigation Seminar
    • Meyer
      Walker
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • limited enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Constitutional Litigation Seminar (20259). 2 units. Federal constitutional adjudication from the vantage of the litigator with an emphasis on Circuit and Supreme Court practice and procedural problems, including jurisdiction, justiciability, exhaustion of remedies, immunities, abstention, and comity. Specific substantive questions of constitutional law currently before the Supreme Court are considered as well. Students will each argue two cases taken from the Supreme Court docket and will write one brief, which may be from that docket, but will likely come from a circuit court decision. Students will also join the faculty members on the bench and will, from time to time, be asked to make brief arguments on very short notice on issues raised in the class. Enrollment limited to twelve. J.A. Meyer and J.M. Walker, Jr.

    Course Bidding: Students who have been accepted will be asked to confirm their commitment to the course before the beginning of the term. Attendance at all class meetings, including the first, is required unless specifically excused for a compelling reason. Any accepted students who decide not to take the class must so inform the instructors by 12 noon on August 31 (the day after the first class). Any waitlisted students who continue to be interested should attend the first class meeting on August 30, and only such waitlisted students who attend the first class meeting will be considered for any class openings.

    Note: The first class meeting will be on Wednesday, August 30, at the Law School in SLB 112. Thereafter, the class will meet at 141 Church Street (directly across the Green from Old Campus) on the following dates: September 6, 14; October 4, 5, 11, and 12; November 1, 2, 8, 9,15, 16, and 29. All class meetings begin at 4:10 p.m. and end at 6 p.m. The break in the class schedule in the middle of the course (mid/late October) is designed to give students a time to write the brief that is required for the class.

    Location: CH141 - COURTRM 3 (Wed)
    CH141 - COURTRM 3 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10248

    Close
    • 20542-01
    • Constitutional Courts under Pressure
    • Grimm
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Constitutional Courts under Pressure (20542). 2 or 3 units. Currently, a number of democratic states are undergoing a transformation toward more authoritarian regimes. Often populist parties claim for themselves the exclusive representation of the will of the people. As a consequence, institutions that may exercise veto powers find themselves under pressure, especially constitutional courts or supreme courts with the power of judicial review. This is the case, for instance, in Hungary, Poland and Turkey. However, the phenomenon is not totally new. There are other examples in history, some with similar, some with different backgrounds (the US, Austria in the 1930s; Germany in the early years of the Federal Republic; Russia, Israel, some Latin American states more recently). In the course we will explore these cases with the purpose of finding out what motivated the attempts, which forms they took, whether similar patterns are at work, which arguments are used, under which conditions courts have a chance to defend themselves agains being curbed, etc. This course will meet for the first half of the semester, between August 28 and October 4. Students who complete Substantial Papers may earn a third unit for the course. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. D. Grimm

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    SLB - 111 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10059
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 11001-02
    • Contracts I
    • Chua
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    SLB - 110 (Wed)
    SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10274
    Exam: 12/13/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 11001-03
    • Contracts I
    • Ayres
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 109 (Wed)
    SLB - 109 (Mon)
    SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10275
    Exam: 12/13/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 11001-04
    • Contracts I
    • Listokin
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 1:35 PM-3:30 PM
      Thu 5:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - FAC-DINING (Wed)
    SLB - FAC-DINING (Mon)
    SLB - FAC-DINING (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10276
    Exam: 12/13/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 11001-05
    • Contracts I
    • Markovits
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 5:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    SLB - 124 (Mon)
    SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10277
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 24 hour(s)

    Close
    • 11001-01
    • Contracts I
    • Brilmayer
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    SLB - 109 (Wed)
    SLB - FAC-DINING (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10273
    Exam: 12/13/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 11001-A
    • Contracts I
    • Ayres
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 129 (Tue)
    SLB - 129 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10271
    Exam: 12/13/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 11001-B
    • Contracts I
    • Carter
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 129 (Tue)
    SLB - 129 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10272
    Exam: 12/13/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20490-01
    • Corporate Environmental Management and Strategy
    • Esty
      Chertow
    • Mon 1:00 PM-2:20 PM
      Wed 1:00 PM-2:20 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Corporate Environmental Management and Strategy (20490). 3 units. This course will focus on understanding the legal, business, and policy logic for making the environment and sustainability a core element of corporate management and strategy. Participants will be asked to analyze how and when environmental, energy, and other sustainability issues can be translated into business model innovation and competitive advantage. The course will combine lectures, case studies, and class discussions on management theory and tools, legal and regulatory frameworks shaping the business-environment interface, and evolving requirements for business success. Project required. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to forty, from all Yale schools; eight seats are reserved for Law students.Also F&ES 807a and MGT 688a. D.C. Esty and M. Chertow.

    Note: This course will meet according to the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies calendar.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest and prior experience and a CV by the close of the bidding period at 4:30 pm on June 22.

    Location: EVANS - 2210 (Mon)
    EVANS - 2210 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10110

    Close
    • 20507-01
    • Corporate Finance
    • Tookes
    • Tue 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
      Thu 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
    • 1.5
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Corporate Finance (20507). 1.5 units. This course will focus on financial management from the perspective of inside the corporation or operating entity. It will use lectures to develop the theory, and cases and problem sets to provide applications. Topics covered include capital budgeting and valuation; capital structure; initial public offerings; mergers; and corporate restructuring. This course will follow the School of Management calendar and will meet during the Fall 1 Session. Also MGT 541a.. H. Tookes.

    Note: This course is offered in two sections. There will be five places for Law students in each section, for a total of 10 places. Any additional spaces are subject to the School of Management cap.

    Note: First-day attendance is required.

    Location: EVANS - 2400 (Tue)
    EVANS - 2400 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10035

    Close
    • 20507-02
    • Corporate Finance
    • Tookes
    • Tue 1:00 PM-2:20 PM
      Thu 1:00 PM-2:20 PM
    • 1.5
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Corporate Finance (20507). 1.5 units. This course will focus on financial management from the perspective of inside the corporation or operating entity. It will use lectures to develop the theory, and cases and problem sets to provide applications. Topics covered include capital budgeting and valuation; capital structure; initial public offerings; mergers; and corporate restructuring. This course will follow the School of Management calendar and will meet during the Fall 1 Session. Also MGT 541a.. H. Tookes.

    Note: This course is offered in two sections. There will be five places for Law students in each section, for a total of 10 places. Any additional spaces are subject to the School of Management cap.

    Note: First-day attendance is required.

    Location: EVANS - 2400 (Tue)
    EVANS - 2400 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10036

    Close
    • 20098-01
    • Corruption, Economic Development, and Democracy
    • Rose-Ackerman
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 to 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Corruption, Economic Development, and Democracy (20098). 2 or 3 units. A seminar on the link between corruption, economic development, and political and bureaucratic institutions, and on economic development. The seminar will draw on research from law, economics, and political science. Topics covered include corruption and democracy, corruption and gift giving, organized crime and corruption, incentives for corruption in particular sectors (e.g., procurement, licensing, taxation), and the international regime designed to limit corruption and illicit financial flows. Paper (2 or 3 units, that will generally satisfy the Substantial Paper requirement for JD students) or self-scheduled examination (2 units). Enrollment limited to ten Law students. Also PLSC 714a. S. Rose-Ackerman.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who bid should also submit a short paragraph explaining their relevant background, both academic and practical, and interest in the subject matter of the course by 4:30 p.m. on June 22. Preference will be given to first-choice students in their last year of law school or in the LLM program.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10032
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20216-01
    • Criminal Procedure: Adjudication and Right to Counsel
    • Meares
    • Tue 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:30 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Procedure: Adjudication and Right to Counsel (20216). 3 units. This course will explore the constitutional law of criminal adjudication. The course begins with constitutional criminal procedure’s beginnings in a case called Hurtado v. California, and covers right to counsel, pre-trial proceedings, grand jury, pleabargaining, right to trial by jury, effective assistance of counsel, right of confrontation, jury selection, prosecutorial discretion, sentencing, and double jeopardy. Class participation is expected and may be taken into account in grading. Criminal Procedure: Investigation is not a prerequisite. Enrollment capped at seventy-five. Scheduled examination. T. Meares.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Tue)
    SLB - 128 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10173
    Exam: 12/18/2017 at 2:00 PM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30105-01
    • Criminal Justice Clinic: Seminar
    • Doherty
      Bruce
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Criminal Justice Clinic (30105) and Fieldwork (30106). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option, for each part (4 units total). The clinic and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. Students will represent defendants in criminal cases in the Geographical Area #23 courthouse (the "GA") on Elm Street in New Haven. Students will handle all aspects of their clients' cases under the direct supervision of clinical faculty. Students will learn how to build relationships with clients, investigate and develop their cases, construct persuasive case theories, negotiate with opposing counsel, prepare motions and briefs, and advocate for clients in court. Students will also explore the legal framework governing the representation of clients in criminal cases, including the rules of professional responsibility. Throughout, students will be encouraged to think critically about the operation of the criminal justice system and to reflect on opportunities for reform. Because of the frequency of court appearances, students must keep two mornings a week (Monday--Friday, 9 a.m. until 1 p.m.) free from other obligations. Students must also return to the law school a few days before the start of the semester to participate in an orientation program intended to prepare them for criminal practice. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited. F. Doherty and S.O. Bruce III.

    Note: New students who are accepted in this clinic must attend a two-day training session to prepare for their first client meetings and court appearances. For the Fall 2017 clinic, these all-day sessions will be held on August 24 and 25, 2017. Attendance is required. Note: Because of obligation to clients, students will be asked to confirm their place in the clinic before the start of classes and a no-drop policy will apply.

    Course Bidding: In addition to ranking this clinic among experiential course selections, students should submit a statement of interest and a CV by the close of the bidding period on June 22, 4:30 p.m.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance, Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10068

    Close
    • 20061-01
    • Criminal Law
    • Yaffe
    • Thu 10:10 AM-11:35 AM
      Fri 10:10 AM-11:35 AM
    • 3
    • Criminal Law & Administration
    • limited enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Criminal Law (20061). 3 units. This course is given in several sections; it must be taken before graduation. This course will be concerned with fundamental topics in substantive criminal law. It will be concerned with the principles underlying the definitions of crimes (the definitions, primarily, of the acts and mental states that constitute crimes); with the way in which mistakes of fact and law are treated by the criminal law; with the law governing homicide and rape; with the general doctrines concerned with attempt and accomplice liability, which are of relevance to many different crimes; and with a selection of exculpating conditions, namely, insanity, intoxication, self-defense, necessity and duress. The Model Penal Code will serve as our primary, although not exclusive, statutory text, as it does in many jurisdictions. Students may satisfy the graduation requirement by satisfactorily completing Criminal Law and Administration or Criminal Law, but they may not enroll in both courses. Enrollment limited to fifty. Self-scheduled examination. G. Yaffe.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Thu)
    SLB - 120 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10045
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30106-01
    • Criminal Justice Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Doherty
      Bruce
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Criminal Justice Clinic: Fieldwork (30106). 2 units, credit/fail or graded, at student option. Students must be enrolled simultaneously in the seminar and fieldwork sections of this clinic. Open only to J.D. students. F.M. Doherty and S.O. Bruce III.

    Course Bidding: Students who bid on the seminar section of this clinic and who are accepted will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section. It is not necessary to bid on the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing tudent, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10069

    Close
    • 20397-01
    • Critical Perspectives on Law and Organizing: Seminar
    • Rosenbloom
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Critical Perspectives on Law and Organizing: Seminar (20397). 2 units. This seminar will explore a range of approaches to community lawyering, with a particular emphasis on the “law-and-organizing” models that have developed over the past twenty-five years within advocacy efforts by and on behalf of low-wage immigrant workers. The course will begin with an examination of various critiques of traditional law reform and legal aid models, and the ongoing debates they have engendered. In the next phase of the course, we will explore a number of case studies of particular organizations and campaigns that have combined legal advocacy and organizing. In the final part of the course, students will give presentations based on their seminar papers. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. R. Rosenbloom.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10182

    Close
    • 20538-01
    • Democracy and Distribution
    • Graetz
      Shapiro
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Democracy and Distribution (20538). 2 units.The attention showered in 2015 on Thomas Piketty’s book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, brought issues of inequality in the distribution of income and wealth to the forefront of public and scholarly attention. An enormous body of research has been produced over the past two decades to understand the nature of the dramatic rise in inequality, especially in the United States, and its causes. A long list of proposals for legal change has emerged in response to the outpouring of data and analysis. This course will explore the facts and the causes of and political barriers to potential responses to these recent developments, principally but not exclusively in the United States. Ultimately, the question requires an examination of the relations between democracy and the distribution of income and wealth. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which different groups, classes, and coalitions affect, and are affected by, democratic distributive politics. Attention will be paid to theories of distribution, politics of distribution, distributive instruments, and the implementation of policies affecting distribution. Substantive topics covered will include, for example, regulation, protectionism, taxes, social insurance, welfare, public opinion, education, and unions. This course will meet according to the Law School calendar. Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit possible, with permission of the instructor. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen law students. Also PLSC . M.J. Graetz and I. Shapiro.

    Location: SML - 120A (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10051

    Close
    • 20027-01
    • Disability and Mental Health Law: Seminar
    • Cremin
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Disability and Mental Health Law: Seminar (20027). 2 units. This seminar will examine discrimination, ethical issues, public policy, and comparative law related to individuals who have disabilities or mental illness. The seminar will begin by introducing the concepts of “disability” and “mental illness” and the application of various theories of justice to individuals who are considered to be “disabled” or “mentally ill.” We will then review statutes that prohibit disability discrimination in five specific areas: employment, public benefits, public accommodations, housing, and voting. The seminar will then cover topics that are central to disability and mental health law, including substitute decision-making, selective abortion, euthanasia, the right to treatment, the right to refuse treatment, civil commitment, criminal responsibility, and institutionalization. Although the focus of the seminar is on law and public policy in the United States, we will regularly examine relevant international and comparative law. Paper required. Enrollment capped at eighteen. K.M. Cremin.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10092

    Close
    • 20442-01
    • Doing Constitutional Law: Some Contemporary Theories
    • Amar
      Bobbitt
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Doing Constitutional Law: Some Contemporary Theories (20442). 2 units. This class will explore some of the contending theories about constitutional interpretation and discuss the distinctive elements, contributions and challenges each presents. Students will read books that are generally regarded as significant in the field, as well as a number of articles. The question to be answered in this course is whether any of these theories deserves to be given preeminence or indeed whether any particular ranking of theories in a pluralistic scheme makes sense. Paper required. A.R. Amar and P. Bobbitt.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10113

    Close
    • 30162-01
    • Education Adequacy Project
    • Rosen
      Knopp
      Taubes
      Moodhe
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Education Adequacy Project (30162). 3 units. The Education Adequacy Project (EAP) builds on the clinic’s victory in 2010, when the Connecticut Supreme Court held that the Connecticut Constitution guarantees students the right to an adequate education. Following this decision, a Connecticut trial judge held in 2016 that Connecticut’s education funding system was arbitrary and irrational, and systematically denied students this constitutionally-provided right. Early this fall, the Connecticut Supreme Court will hear the state’s appeal from the trial court order. EAP students will have the opportunity to participate in short-term projects such as helping to prepare for oral argument. Meanwhile, the Connecticut General Assembly, as it considers a new biennial budget, continues to debate competing reforms to state and local education funding in response to the trial court’s rulings. We will work with our client, the Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding, to advocate for reforms that advance the goals of the clinic’s litigation: to provide an adequate and equitable education for all Connecticut students.

    The clinic is looking for students interested in pushing the boundaries of education adequacy reform through a variety of means and in distinct contexts. Past academic and/or professional experience in education is a plus. In addition to long-term projects, students may be assigned specific individual or group tasks with challenging, and oftentimes unpredictable, deadlines. The seminar portion of the clinic will meet once a week to develop and discuss ongoing and future projects.

    Students who wish to enroll in the clinic should e-mail the student directors with your resume and a statement of interest in addition to bidding the course online. Permission of the instructors required. D.N. Rosen, A.A. Knopp, J.P. Moodhe, and A. Taubes.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students should submit a short statement describing their interest in the clinic by 4:30 p.m. on June 22.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship; or Temporary Restraining Order Project.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 13389

    Close
    • 20647-01
    • Empirical Research I
    • Tyler
    • Mon 8:30 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:30 AM-10:00 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Empirical Research I (20647). 3 units. This class will introduce students to basic ideas about how to design and conduct empirical research. The focus will be on core principles for conducting and evaluating research. This will include both how to evaluate research in published articles and policy reviews and how to design and conduct original empirical work. A variety of techniques are discussed, including observational and coding approaches; correlational techniques; quasi-experiments and laboratory and field experiments (randomized control trials). Emphasis is placed on learning how to use various approaches. Students will work with actual datasets and through a set of exercises designed to provide hands-on training in core techniques of data analysis using the facilities in the computer lab. Enrollment capped at twenty. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also PYSC 753a. T. Tyler.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    SLB - 124 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10139
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20348-01
    • Environmental Law
    • Camacho
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:40 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-5:40 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Environmental Law and Policy (20348). 3 units. This course is an introductory survey of environmental common law and the major federal environmental statutes, including the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and hazardous waste and toxic substance laws. It will explore foundational issues of statutory and regulatory analysis, ethics, politics, and economics in these various legal contexts. The course will also consider various themes of environmental problems, including scientific uncertainty, risk, and risk perception. Given the breadth of the environmental law field, the course focuses on analyzing regulatory structure (i.e., the variety of existing and potential regulatory mechanisms for protecting and regulating usage of the environment) rather than either a superficial overview of every possible environmental topic or comprehensive analysis of only a few environmental statutes. The course will also integrate a skills component that explores issues in statutory interpretation, legal ethics, federalism, and standing through several hypothetical problems as practiced from the perspective of environmental groups, government agencies, and regulated entity clients. Scheduled examination. Also F&ES 824a. A.E. Camacho.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10087
    Exam: 12/12/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30164-01
    • Environmental Protection Clinic: Policy and Advocacy
    • Galperin
      Suatoni
      Hawkins
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Environmental Protection Clinic: Policy and Advocacy (30164). 3 units, credit/fail. A clinical seminar in which students will be engaged with actual environmental law or policy problems on behalf of client organizations (environmental groups, government agencies, international bodies, etc.). The class will meet weekly, and students will work ten to twelve hours per week in interdisciplinary groups (with students from the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and other departments or schools at Yale) on projects with a specific legal or policy product (e.g., draft legislation or regulations, hearing testimony, analytic studies, policy proposals). Students may propose projects and client organizations, subject to approval by the instructors. Enrollment limited. Also F&ES 970a. J. Galperin, D. Hawkins, and L. Suatoni.

    Course Bidding: Students should should email Professor Galperin with a CV and a 500-word statement of interest explaining the purpose for taking the class and interest in environmental protection. The CV and statement should be send to Professor Galperin by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. Students may also upload their CVs and statements through the YLS bidding system.

    Note: First class attendance is mandatory because students will bid on clinic projects at that time. Students may not drop the clinic after they have been assigned a project and a team.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10193

    Close
    • 30187-01
    • EnvironmentalProtectionClinic: Practice at the Intersection of Civil Rights and Environment Law
    • Lado
    • Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Environmental Protection Clinic: Practice at the Intersection of Civil Rights and Environment Law (30187). 4 units. Students will have the opportunity to help launch Yale Law School’s new environmental justice clinic, which will be in its second semester, and to develop a docket to improve environmental quality and public health in communities of color and low-income communities. In the wake of a national conversation about the water crisis in Flint and lead poisoning across the country, students will be in on the ground floor as the clinic takes on cases to address inequality in the distribution of health hazards as well as procedural inequities they face as they try to assert their own vision for the future of their neighborhoods, towns and cities. The EJ Clinic’s work will include cases and advocacy projects to enforce civil rights in the environmental context, and, in the new political climate, work with clients to develop legal and advocacy strategies to address issues of environmental injustice in particular communities.

    Students will work in teams under faculty supervision and take responsibility for litigation and advocacy. Their activities will include the following:
    • Working directly with clients, co-counsel, opposing counsel, allies, environmental agencies, and EPA;
    • Developing case records by conducting factual investigation and working with experts;
    • Legal analysis, memos, pleadings and drafting other legal documents (such as public disclosure requests, comments on federal rules, etc.);
    • Representation of clients;
    • Negotiations and settlement.
    • Developing the Clinic's intake and referral system, communications capacity, and outreach effort.

    In addition to civil rights compliance and enforcement in the environmental context, the Clinic will evaluate potential litigation and advocacy to address the sources and impacts of air and water contamination in disproportionately affected communities, with a focus on communities in Connecticut.

    Students will also participate in a seminar intended to explore issues raised by the clinical practice, including both substantive issues of environmental and civil rights law, as well as questions related to practice, including ethical and social dimensions of lawyering in this context. The seminar will meet approximately two hours per week. In addition to class meetings and preparation, clinic participants must complete and document approximately fifteen hours of clinical work per week. Students will also be expected to participate in two weekly one-half-hour team meetings. While there is no prerequisite for the clinic, participants should have a strong interest in working on behalf of environmentally overburdened communities — often communities of color and low-income communities. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. Also F&ES 974a. M.E. Lado.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, Law students should submit a CV and a short statement expressing interest in the clinic, which will focus on environmental issues affecting communities of color and low-income communities and, particularly, civil rights enforcement in the environmental context, by uploading to the bidding system by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. The statement should be no more than one page in length. Non-Law students interested in the clinic should send a CV and one-page statement of interest to marianne.engleman-lado@yale.edu

    Note: First-day attendance is required unless permission for absence is granted by the instructor in advance of the first meeting.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10125

    Close
    • 20551-01
    • ERISA: Federal Regulation of Pension and Employee Benefit Plans: Seminar
    • Langbein
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    ERISA: Federal Regulation of Pension and Employee Benefit Plans: Seminar (20551). 3 units. The private pension system now commands assets exceeding $25 trillion. Pension and employee benefit plans have become ubiquitous features of the modern employment relationship. The legal regulation of these plans is both an independent legal specialty and a subject that overlaps other fields, including corporations, bankruptcy, labor, tax, trust, domestic relations, employment discrimination, and health care law. This seminar will supply an introduction to the regulatory law, especially the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) of 1974, as amended, and the case law. Particular attention will be directed to the challenges brought about by the decline of traditional defined benefit pension plans and the rise of individual account plans, especially the problems associated with participant investing, employer stock plans, and lump-sum as opposed to annuitized distributions. Other topics of inquiry include ERISA's impact on health care finance and the troubled pension insurance system for defined benefit plans administered through the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation. Enrollment capped at fifteen. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. J. H. Langbein.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10053
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30166-01
    • Ethics Bureau at Yale: Pro Bono Professional Responsibility Advice and Advocacy
    • Fox
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Ethics Bureau at Yale: Pro Bono Professional Responsibility Advice and Advocacy (30166). 3 units. Lawyers' need for ethics advice, consultation and expert opinions is not limited to those whose clients can pay. Impecunious clients and the lawyers who serve them are in need of ethics counseling and legal opinions on a regular basis. For example, Yale law students have provided essential assistance preparing amicus briefs in numerous Supreme Court cases. A few of these cases resulted in victory for the petitioner and citations to the amicus brief in the majority opinions.

    The work of the Bureau consists of four major components. First, the Bureau provides ethics counseling for pro bono organizations such as legal services offices, public defenders, and other NGO’s. Second, the Bureau prepares standard-of-care opinions relating to the conduct of lawyers, prosecutors and judges that are required in cases alleging ineffective assistance of counsel and other challenges to lawyer and judicial conduct. Third, from time to time, the Yale Ethics Bureau provides assistance to amici curiae, typically bar associations or ethics professors, on questions of professional responsibility in cases in which such issues are front and center. It did so in a United States Supreme Court case, Maples v. Allen, citing the amicus brief of the clinic. The clinic also prepared a brief for Williams v. Pennsylvania, with the brief cited by several Justices in oral arguments. Fourth, the Bureau provides ethics opinions for the National Association of Public Defenders, position papers for various American Bar Association entities, articles for law reviews and other publications, and editorials on topics of current interest.

    The students working at the Bureau meet for class two hours per week and are expected to put in approximately ten hours on Bureau projects each week. The classroom work explores the law governing lawyers, but also considers the role of expert witnesses in the litigation process, its appropriateness and the procedural issues thereby raised. No prerequisites. Preference given to prior Ethics Bureau enrollees and students who previously took a course in professional responsibility. This clinic is yearlong and students mut commit to both semesters. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. L. Fox.

    Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among their experiential course selections, interested students should also submit a short statement of interest by the close of the bidding period on December 7 at 4:30 p.m. In the statement, students should address the reasons why they seek admission to the clinic and a commitment that they are willing to enroll for a minimum of two semesters.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is required. There is a no-drop policy for this course.

    Location: SLB - K290A (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10130

    Close
    • 20622-01
    • Ethics in Law and Markets
    • Macey
      Fleming
      Beirne
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Ethics in Law and Markets (20622). 3 units. This course will focus on how a society’s ethical norms and values have been reflected throughout history. Generally speaking, this course will study the validity of the hypothesis that “an economic system runs on trust, reputation, and ethics, and that any deficit in these fundamental components of capital markets and financial markets necessarily will imperil the financial system as a whole." We will discuss the evolution of views on ethics in business generally and how, if at all, the dominant ethical views in a society affect business conditions. We also will consider the way that globalization and the emergence of economic interactions among many different cultures have affected attitudes and practices related to ethics. We also will consider the future of trust, reputation and ethics in business. Attention will be paid to ethical issues within the private sector as well as in government and across society generally. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twenty-five. J.R. Macey, G. Fleming, and B.L. Beirne .

    Location: SLB - 124 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10149

    Close
    • 20041-01
    • Experimental Jurisprudence
    • Knobe
    • Mon 12:10 PM-1:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Experimental Jurisprudence (20041). 1 unit. Investigation of legally relevant concepts using systemaic experimental methods. Topics will include the concepts of causation, consent, similarity, intention. Emphasis will be on helping students development and implement their own experimental studies. This course will follow the calendar of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Also PSYC 772a. J. Knobe.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 14231

    Close
    • 20018-01
    • Family Law
    • Schultz
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Family Law (20018). 4 units. This course will address the regulation of intimate relationships between adults (through marriage and divorce, civil unions, pre-nuptial contracts, and the like), between parents and children (through reproductive technologies, adoption, child custody, termination of parental rights, eldercare, etc.), and state involvement in intimate, sexual and reproductive life generally (through the doctrines of constitutional privacy and equal protection, social welfare benefits, and criminal law, in addition to family law). The interplay among the State, family, and market, and the formation of personal identity in and through these arenas, will be explored throughout the course. Issues of socioeconomic class, gender, race, and sexuality will arise in many of the subjects studied over the course of the semester. Course materials will include primarily case law, statutory materials, and legal scholarship, but the social and economic norms that guide and are guided by the law will also be examined. Scheduled examination. V. Schultz.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Mon)
    SLB - 128 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 12895
    Exam: 12/12/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20616-01
    • Food and Drug Administration Law and Policy
    • Kesselheim
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Food and Drug Administration Law and Policy (20616). 2 units, with a credit/fail option. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is the premier consumer protection agency in the United States, with control over the availability and public discourse about potentially life-saving therapeutics, foods, supplements, and related consumer products. Its authority has been built in response to public health crises, and is constantly under scrutiny from all sides of the political spectrum. In this course, we will review the history of the FDA's regulation over the health care products market, the noteworthy legislation that has shaped its oversight in this area, Supreme Court and other cases that have impacted its authority, and an introduction to key current controversies related to the FDA that affect health care delivery (this course will not cover food law or tobacco). The enduring theme will be how the FDA balances its vital public safety role against countervailing forces of personal autonomy and the rights or interests of consumers, patients, physicians, and corporations. Each class will be organized around interactive discussion introducing students to the material, including hypothetical cases that will require students to apply the day’s lessons and themes in determining legal and policy solutions. Students with high quality papers will be given specific guidance in submitting them for publication in the peer-reviewed medical/public health/policy literature. Paper of 2,500-4,000 words is required. Paper required. Enrollment limited to forty. A.S. Kesselheim.

    Note: This class will meet nine times over the course of the semester: August 28, September 11, September 18, October 2, October 9, October 23, November 6, November 13, and December 4.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10181

    Close
    • 20366-01
    • Federal and State Courts in a Federal System
    • Resnik
    • Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal and State Courts in a Federal System (20366). 4 units. The “Federal Courts” play a central role in today’s political debates, even as the bulk of litigation in the U.S. takes place in state courts. The class will focus on the development of the identity, doctrine, and jurisprudence of the federal courts in relation to state courts and to the other branches of the federal government. Thus, the class will consider the role played by the U.S. Constitution in allocating authority among the branches of the federal government and among state, federal, and tribal courts. Further, because claims about national and of state "sovereignty" lace the materials, the class will focus on their import. Beneath the sometimes dry discussions of jurisdictional rules and doctrines of comity lie conflicts about such issues as race, religion, the beginning and end of life, abortion, Indian tribal rights, and gender equality. In addition to considering the political and historical context of the doctrinal developments, the class will examine the institutional structures that have evolved in the federal courts, theories of federalism, current questions about the size and shape of the federal courts, the different methods for judicial selection and kinds of state and federal judges, as well as the effects of social and demographic categories on the processes of federal adjudication. On occasion, the class will also consider concepts of federalism comparatively. Class participation will be part of the final grade. No credit/fail option. This class may have enrollment capped and whether it is will be determined after course bidding ends. Self-scheduled examination. J. Resnik.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10058
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20222-01
    • Federal Income Taxation
    • Liscow
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Federal Income Taxation (20222). 4 units. An introductory course on the federal income taxation of individuals and businesses. The course will provide an overview of the basic legal doctrine and will emphasize statutory interpretation and a variety of income tax policy issues. The class will consider the role of the courts, the Congress, and the IRS in making tax law and tax policy and will consider the impact of the tax law on the distribution of income and opportunity and on economic behavior. Topics will include fringe benefits, business expenses, the interest deduction, the taxation of the family, and capital gains. No prerequisites. No preference given to third-year students. Enrollment capped at forty. Scheduled examination. Z. Liscow.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Wed)
    SLB - 122 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10136
    Exam: 12/11/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20076-01
    • Financial Stability Regulation
    • McNamara
      Rhee
    • Tue 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
      Thu 10:10 AM-11:30 AM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Financial Stability Regulation (20076). 3 units. This course will convey a comparative approach to financial stability regulation around the world. It will cover international guidelines (Basel, Solvency), supra-national arrangements in the EU, and national-level laws in major economies on management of systemic risk and fighting a financial crisis. The course will aim to promote an understanding of different regulatory landscapes across various jurisdictions. Also MGT 943a. C. McNamara and J. Rhee.

    Note: This course will follow the School of Management calendar.

    Location: EVANS - 4430 (Tue)
    EVANS - 4430 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 13852

    Close
    • 20653-01
    • The Foundations of Legal Scholarship
    • Kahn
      Markovits
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    The Foundations of Legal Scholarship (20653). 4 units. This seminar will focus on legal scholarship, including some older classics as well as newer work that we consider important. Books, articles, and papers will cover a wide range of subject areas and methodologies in both public law and private law. Paper required. Permission of the instructors required. P.W. Kahn and D. Markovits.

    Coures Bidding: All first-year students in the Ph.D. in Law program are admitted to this seminar, which is a requirement of their program. In addition, the instructors welcome applications from other students, particularly those interesed in teaching law. Applications briefly outlining the student's interest in, and preparation for, this course should be submitted by e-mail to both Professor Kahn and Professor Markovits by July 10, 2017. You may also upload statements to the bidding system if you do so by June 22.

    Location: SLB - FAC-DINING (Mon)
    SLB - FAC-DINING (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10072

    Close
    • 20515-01
    • The Global Financial Crisis
    • Metrick
    • Tue 2:40 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:40 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    [The] Global Financial Crisis (20515). 3 units. This course will survey the causes, events, policy responses, and aftermath of the recent global financial crisis. The main goal is to provide a comprehensive view of this major economic event within a framework that explains the dynamics of financial crises in a modern economy. The course will be blended between lectures (many online), panel discussions with major actors from the crisis, and small group meetings. Course requirements ae the preparation of four memos and a final paper with either an extended analysis of a case or a literature review for a specific topic from the syllabus. The course is cross-listed at the School of Management, Yale Law School, and Yale College, but is open to all Yale students. The only prerequisite is successful completion of a course in introductory economics. A. Metrick.

    Note: This course will meet according to the School of Management calendar. Course materials will be posed on Canvas.

    Location: EVANS - 2400 (Tue)
    EVANS - 2400 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10057

    Close
    • 20674-01
    • Habeas Corpus
    • Fidell
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Habeas Corpus (20674). 2 units. Habeas corpus offers a window on the role of the federal courts; the nature of federalism; and the tensions inherent in a system of separated powers. This course will trace the history and changing role of the Great Writ in the administration of justice and the protection of individual rights. A starting point will be to situate the current period of habeas eclipse against the broader political and legal landscape, including such post-Warren Court preoccupations as federalism, crime and punishment in general and the death penalty in particular, as well as the twenty-first-century search for ways to ensure national security and heightened awareness of the disproportionate impact of the criminal justice and correctional systems on racial minorities. We will examine the constitutional issues, the key role played by the Suspension Clause, and the application of the writ in such disparate settings as post-conviction review of criminal proceedings, civil commitment, and the indefinite detention of unlawful combatants at Guantánamo Bay. Along the way we will confront the scope of presidential authority, separation of powers and the interaction among the Branches. How have the federal courts understood their authority? Is habeas a “one-way ratchet” for the unending recognition of new rights, as some have complained? Has one form of judicial activism been replaced by another? What principles have been established, and to what extent is the law of habeas in one setting transferable to others? What can we learn about the exercise of judicial power in times of crisis? An essential part of the course will be an exploration of the role and efficacy of habeas corpus in other countries (including non-common law jurisdictions), international human rights habeas jurisprudence, and the habeas jurisprudence of international criminal tribunals. Paper required. E.R. Fidell.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10008

    Close
    • 20010-01
    • History of the Common Law: Procedure and Institutions
    • Langbein
    • Mon 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    History of the Common Law: Procedure and Institutions (20010). 3 units. An introduction to the historical origins of Anglo-American law, in which students study selected historical sources and extracts from legal-historical scholarship. Topics: (1) the jury system: medieval origins and European alternatives, separation of grand and petty juries, changes in the functions and composition of the jury from medieval to modern times, the law of evidence and other forms of jury control; appellate review of jury verdicts; the growing disuse of juries and of trials in modern times; (2) civil justice: the forms of action and the pleading system; the regular and itinerant courts; the judiciary; law reporting and other forms of legal literature; Chancery, the trust, equitable procedure and remedies; historical perspectives on the scope of the right to civil jury trial under the Seventh Amendment; the deterioration of Chancery procedure and the fusion of law and equity; the codification movement; the drafting of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure; the retreat from trial; (3) criminal justice: medieval criminal procedure; presentment and indictment; the recasting of criminal procedure in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; the officialization of prosecution and policing; the rise and fall of Star Chamber; defense counsel and the rise of the adversary system in the eighteenth century; the privilege against self-incrimination; the law of evidence; criminal sanctions and sentencing; the emergence of public prosecution; the trend to plea bargaining and other forms of nontrial procedure; (4) legal education: the inns of court; apprenticeship; the emergence of university legal education in the United States; (5) the legal profession: attorneys and barristers; the regulation of admission to the profession; the development of law firms and the trend to megafirms and their twenty-first-century travails. Scheduled examination. J. H. Langbein.

    Location: SLB - 127 (Mon)
    SLB - 127 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10052
    Exam: 12/14/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30115-01
    • Housing Clinic: Seminar
    • Pottenger
      Knopp
      Gentes
      Marx
    • Mon 1:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Housing Clinic: Seminar (30115) and Fieldwork (30116). 2 units, credit/fail (seminar) and 2 units, graded (fieldwork), for a total of 4 units. Students must be enrolled in both the seminar and fieldwork sections. This new clinic combines elements of the former landlord tenant and mortgage foreclosure litigation clinics, along with a new clinical focus on “Fair Housing” policy issues. Students will select one from among three "tracks"; this will include the MFL Clinic’s “Attorney for a Day” program in foreclosure court, foreclosures, evictions, or Fair Housing. Each track will meet separately for one specialized weekly class session, and the full clinic also will meet together once a week, for more general policy (including the role discrimination has played in the government’s and industry’s treatment of homeowners and renters), ethics, and skills-training sessions. All students will be assigned to a client-centered team within their track, which also will meet weekly for an hour's supervision session.

    In addition to these four scheduled hours, students will be expected usually to attend several sessions of the court handling cases in their respective tracks including, for foreclosures, the Clinic’s Attorney for a Day Program. Foreclosures are usually heard Monday mornings and evictions on Tuesday or Thursday mornings. Fair Housing case-scheduling will be both less frequent and more irregular and may also involve additional legislative and policy projects, as this student team will also monitor whether the federal government’s enforcement of Fair Housing programs has changed since the recent election.

    In addition to defending their clients' homes, all three tracks will handle cases seeking affirmative relief. Student teams also will tackle legislative remedies arising from the clinic's clients' cases. Students are expected to devote at least 8 to12 hours outside of class to their clients' cases each week. Case coverage responsibility extends to the start of Spring term. For Fall Term 2017, we plan to accept up to 12 students for the Foreclosure track; 4 to 6 students for Evictions; and 2 to 4 students for Fair Housing. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. J.L. Pottenger, Jr., J. Gentes, A. Knopp, and A. Marx.

    Note: The regular meeting of the entire class will generally be on Wednesday, but at the beginning of Fall 2017, everyone admitted should plan to attend the first class meeting on Monday, August 28. Thereafter, the Monday meetings will be for the different tracks according to the schedule set up by the instructor.

    Note: Attendance at first class meeting is required. A no-drop policy will apply thereafter. There is no need to specify projects or issue preferences until after being accepted through the bidding process. There will be plenty of time to sort that out between now and the start of the fall term.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and anyof the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - M64 (Mon)
    SLB - 110 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10024

    Close
    • 20134-01
    • Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events
    • Kahn
      Silk
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Human Rights Workshop: Current Issues and Events (20134). 1 unit, credit/fail. Conducted in workshop format and led by Professor Paul Kahn, Director of the Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights, the course will examine contemporary issues in human rights practice and theory. Guest speakers, including scholars, advocates and journalists, will present each week on a diverse range of topics in human rights. Readings are generally distributed in advance of each session. Students enrolled in the workshop for one unit of ungraded credit will prepare short response papers before several of the sessions and be responsible for asking the speaker a question at each of those sessions. P.W. Kahn and J.J. Silk.

    Location: SLB - FAC-LOUNGE (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10171

    Close
    • 20547-01
    • Immigration Law, Policy and Constitutional Rights
    • Guttentag
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Immigration Law, Policy and Constitutional Rights (20547). 3 units. This survey course will provide a foundation in the basics of the immigration law system, the policy choices it reflects, and the constitutional principles governing the regulation and rights of non-citizens. The course will then explore various topical legal and policy issues related to immigrants' rights and immigration reform as well as the normative values informing contemporary treatment of documented and undocumented immigrants. The course will draw on the instructor’s involvement in many current issues and extensive background litigating on behalf of the constitutional and civil rights cases of non-citizens in federal courts nationwide and recent service as senior policy advisor in government. Among the issues that will be covered are: detention of immigrants; state and local immigration regulation; discrimination against non-citizens in employment and public benefits; the intersection of criminal and immigration law; federal enforcement and non-enforcement policies; access to the courts and the right to judicial review; and labor and workplace rights of undocumented workers. Guest speakers will address areas of expertise. No prior course or background in immigration law is expected. Self-scheduled examination. L. Guttentag.

    Note: This three-unit course will meet on a four-hour schedule to allow extra class meeting time, rather than additional make-up classes, for weeks when the instructor will be away.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Mon)
    SLB - 120 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10134
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20269-01
    • International Criminal Law
    • Damaska
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    International Criminal Law (20269). 2 or 3 units. The seminar will begin with an inquiry into the goals of international justice. Do they depart from objectives of national criminal justice? Are they realistic? Do alternative responses to mass atrocities exist, or can they be developed? The sources of international criminal law will come up for examination next. Is their use compatible with the insistence of national justice systems that crimes should be clearly defined ex ante? If they are not compatible, can this fact be justified? After these general introductory themes, the crime of aggression, war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide are examined in some detail, both under the law of ad hoc tribunals and the law of the permanent interntional Criminal Court. The seminar will end with an examination of departures of international criminal procedure and evidence from the forms of justice prevailing in national law enforcement systems. Scheduled examination or paper option. Enrollment limited to twenty. M.R. Damaška.

    Location: SLB - K190A (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10122
    Exam: 12/11/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20612-01
    • International Trade Law
    • Grewal
    • Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
      Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    International Trade Law (20612). 4 units. This course will examine the laws, policies, and multilateral institutions governing the global trade in goods and services, with a particular focus on the main multilateral trading body, the World Trade Organization (WTO). It will also consider the role of regional trade agreements, and the regulation of cross-border flows of capital, information, and investment in structuring economic globalization. Since international economic law is a rapidly evolving field with few long-standing doctrines, the historical and normative analysis of global trade will be necessarily emphasized throughout the course, and, in that vein, the class will consider the role of environmental protection, human rights, and labor regulation in international trade law and policy. Scheduled examination. D. Grewal.

    Note: First-day attendance is required.

    Location: SLB - 120 (Tue)
    SLB - 120 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10133
    Exam: 12/19/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20078-01
    • International Legal Theory Seminar
    • Brilmayer
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    International Legal Theory Seminar (20078). 2 or 3 units. The international system, famously, is a "state of anarchy." What does this mean? Is the characterization meaningful? How does it affect international law as it is commonly understood -- subject matter such as enforcement of treaties, self defense, international human rights, etc.? The readings will consist of published articles on international legal theory plus works-in-progress, particularly draft book chapters by the instructor. Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit available. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. L. Brilmayer.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10115

    Close
    • 20545-01
    • International Law and Foreign Relations: Seminar
    • Hathaway
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Skills
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    International Law and Foreign Relations: Seminar (20545). 4 units. This course will offer an opportunity to study, research, and participate in current legal debates over international law and foreign relations law. Students will work on research topics selected by the instructor and the class from among those presented by U.S. congressional staff, executive branch lawyers, or nonprofit groups working on issues relating to international law or foreign relations. Research projects may also be generated by the class itself. In past years, the seminar has researched topics including the law of cyber-attack, the power of the U.S. government to detain terrorism suspects, the scope of the Treaty Power, the relationship between human rights law and the law of armed conflict, extraterritorial application of human rights obligations, the law governing the U.S. targeted killing program, and the legal requirements of various human rights treaties. The seminar has also submitted amicus briefs to the D.C. Circuit and U.S. Supreme Court. Students will work both individually and in small groups to write reports on selected topics and, as appropriate, produce recommendations for reform. Weekly class meetings provide an opportunity for students to present and discuss their ongoing research. Students will also have an opportunity to meet with attorneys and policymakers who are directly involved in the legal debates on which the class is working. Substantial Paper credit is available. Paper required. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructor required. O. Hathaway.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a short statement of interest and a CV through the bidding system by June 22, 4:30 p.m. Listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections constitutes authorization for the instructor to review the student's Law School transcript.

    Note: First-day attendance is required for those who are admitted.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10054

    Close
    • 20396-01
    • International Investment Law
    • Reisman
    • Mon 9:10 AM-11:00 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    International Investment Law (20396). 2 units. As foreign direct investment has increased as a function of globalization, so have disputes about it. This seminar will examine the treaties (and their negotiation) concluded to encourage and regulate foreign investment, the international law and procedure applied in the third-party resolution of international investment disputes, and the critical policy issues that must now be addressed. Papers may qualify for Substantial Paper or Supervised Analytic Writing credit. Enrollment will be capped at twenty-five. Scheduled examination or paper option. W.M. Reisman.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10027
    Exam: 12/14/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20415-01
    • Land Use
    • Ellickson
    • Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
      Wed 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Land Use (20415). 3 units. Land use law shapes the destinies of cities, the sprawl of suburbs, and the fates of rural lands. This course will examine the array of devices, legal and nonlegal, that governments, developers, and opponents of development employ to influence the land development process. Zoning regulations -- the primary tool of public land use management and a frequent target of constitutional complaint -- are a central focus. Also addressed are topics such as historic preservation, environmental impact reporting, homeowner associations, growth controls, and mechanisms for financing the urban infrastructure. This offering is designed to supplement Property, but that course is not a prerequisite. Scheduled examination. R.C. Ellickson.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    SLB - 121 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10006
    Exam: 12/12/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20230-01
    • Law and the Opioid Crisis
    • Gluck
      Ayres
      Stith
      Barnes
      Haupt
    • Mon 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Law and the Opioid Crisis (20230). 2 units. This course will examine the opioid crisis from as many different angles as possible, including the role that health law, physician practices, criminal law, the war on drugs, and mental health law have played in creating the crisis. It also will explore social justice issues relating to the crisis, as well as more specific topics, including impact on special populations. Topics will be responsive to the interests of the students in the course, and students are welcome to suggest additional areas of focus. Students will be responsible for leading one session of the course, including collecting course materials for that session and, after a break in the course, to allow for writing, submitting either a short article, policy paper or proposed legislation and, as relevant, contributing to special legal/medical journal dedicated to the topics of the course. Supervised Analytic Writing and Substantial Paper credit available. Paper required. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. A. Gluck, I. Ayres, K. Stith, M. Barnes, and C.E. Haupt.

    Note: This course will have one e-meeting the week before classes start, in which students will be asked to commit to the course and each student will be given ownership over one class topic so that he/she can work with a designated faculty member in assembling course materials for that part of the course. No prior familiarity with the subject is required. Newcomers welcome.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a CV and a short (no more than two paragraphs) statement of interest by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. If you are interested in any particular aspect of the opioid crisis, whether health, criminal law, social justice, or anything else, please note it in your statement. No previous experience or knowledge is required.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 12460

    Close
    • 20036-01
    • Law, Economics, and Organization
    • Jolls
      Romano
    • Thu 4:10 PM-5:40 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Law, Economics, and Organization (20036). 1 unit, credit/fail. This seminar will meet jointly with the Law, Economics, and Organization Workshop, an interdisciplinary faculty workshop that brings to Yale Law School scholars, generally from other universities, who present papers based on their current research. The topics will involve a broad range of issues of general legal and social science interest. Students registering for the seminar and participating in the workshop will receive 1 unit of ungraded credit per term. Neither Substantial Paper nor Supervised Analytic Writing credit will be available through the seminar. Short reaction papers will be required during the term. Permission of the instructors required. C. Jolls and R. Romano.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor courses, students should email Professor Jolls by the end of the bidding period on June 22, 4:30 p.m., for information and to be admitted to the seminar. Please note, however, that a formal statement of interest or background is not necessary.

    Note: The workshop meets on alternating Thursdays. The specific calendar will be announced at the beginning of the term.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10071

    Close
    • 30201-01
    • Legal Assistance: Reentry Clinic
    • Eppler-Epstein
      Shaffer
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 3:10 PM-5:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Legal Assistance: Reentry Clinic (30201). 4 units, credit/fail with a graded option. The New Haven Legal Assistance Reentry Clinic will provide civil legal representation to people with criminal convictions to help them challenge and navigate barriers to their successful reentry to society.

    Throughout the nation, people on all sides of the political spectrum have begun to re-examine the “tough on crime” policies of the past two decades that have led to the huge expansion of our prison population, at enormous economic, societal and personal cost. In Connecticut, Governor Malloy has championed the state as a “Second Chance Society” where people with criminal convictions receive an opportunity for a new beginning, to live positive, successful, law-abiding lives post incarceration. Yet the barriers to success continue for people who have criminal records, making it challenging for them to find employment and housing, access health and other services, and overcome the stigma attached to having criminal convictions on their record.

    Students in the Reentry Clinic will have an opportunity to represent individual clients on a variety of legal issues. Through this work, students will also identify and research challenges facing this population that invite litigation or legislative strategies for broader reforms. The clinic will accept cases referred from the Transitions Medical-Legal Partnership and existing Reentry support organizations, including Easter Seals Community Reentry Services (http://www.eastersealsgoodwill.org) , Project More (http://www.projectmore.org), Project Fresh Start (http://www.cityofnewhaven.com/mayor/prisonreentry.asp), Family Reentry (http://www.familyreentry.org), the New Haven Reentry Roundtable and other agencies working with this population.

    Examples of the direct representation cases students may work on include denials of housing subsidies based on an applicant’s criminal record, applications for pardons, employment discrimination based on the disparate impact of criminal convictions on minorities, access to health care and other public benefits and modification of child support obligations. Cases that the clinic will accept from Transitions include those in which ex-offender status both is and is not expressly at issue, because both kinds of cases reflect the immediate needs of this particular population. Students will represent clients in a variety of forums, including administrative hearings before Housing Authorities, the CHRO or EEOC, and the Department of Social Services; hearings before the Connecticut Board of Pardons and Parole; and state court.

    Students will gain experience in all aspects of lawyering, including interviewing clients and witnesses; written advocacy (examples include litigation pleadings, correspondence with clients, opposing counsel, and other third parties and letter memoranda); informal and formal fact investigation; and oral advocacy (examples include negotiations and questioning witnesses and presenting oral argument at administrative or court hearings). Students will also have an opportunity to engage in systemic reform by conducting legal and policy research to identify avenues for broader reforms. Students will be encouraged to engage in community meetings regarding reentry issues, including New Haven’s monthly Reentry Roundtable, and Fresh Start Advisory Group.

    During the first month of the semester, class will meet Wednesday and Friday for substantive trainings. During the latter part of the semester, class will meet Wednesday, and small group supervisions will be scheduled during the Friday time slot or other times to be arranged by participants. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to six. A. Eppler-Epstein and E.R. Shaffer.

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students. The two meeting times reflect two credits for the seminar component and two credits for supervision and fieldwork. Classes and supervision will be held at the New Haven Legal Assistance offices, located at 426 State Street in New Haven, a 10-15 minute walk from the Law School.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Note: Attendance at the first class is required. A no-drop policy applies thereafter.

    Location: NHLAO - CONF (Fri)
    NHLAO - CONF (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 12421

    Close
    • 20522-01
    • Legal Profession: Traversing the Ethical Minefield
    • Fox
    • Mon 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:35 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      New York Bar Professional Responsibility
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Legal Profession: Traversing the Ethical Minefield (20522). 3 units. Almost every course you take in law school makes you better able to help your clients fulfill their hopes and dreams. This course is designed to help fulfill your own professional obligations while also providing services to your clients consistent with their ethical entitlements. Through the use of hypothetical problems grounded in the real world, the class will explore many of the challenging dilemmas that confront the conscientious lawyer who wants to conform his or her conduct to the applicable rules of professional conduct and other law governing lawyers. At the same time we will consider whether the present rules of professional conduct properly address the issues with which the profession must grapple in striking delicate balances among the obligations of lawyers vis-à-vis clients, lawyers as officers of the court and lawyers as citizens. The class will use a casebook, Susan Martyn & Lawrence Fox, Traversing the Ethical Minefield, and a standards book, Susan Martyn, Lawrence Fox & Brad Wendel, The Law Governing Lawyers. Class attendance and participation are essential. Enrollment capped at twenty-five. Scheduled examination. L. Fox.

    Location: SLB - 121 (Mon)
    SLB - 121 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10129
    Exam: 12/14/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20563-01
    • Legal Theory Workshop Seminar
    • Rubenfeld
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 1 or 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Legal Theory Colloquium (20563). 1 or 2 units. Every semester at Yale Law School, six leading scholars present work to members of the faculty at the Yale Legal Theory Workshop. This semester's speakers include Professors Jed Purdy, Michael Klarman, Owen Fiss, Elyn Saks, and Tim Wu. Students in this seminar will attend the Workshop, reading and discussing in advance the speakers’ papers. The Workshop meets on alternate Thursdays from 4:10 – 6:00 p.m. In addition to the Workshop, there will be six seminar meetings, held on the Wednesday evening before the Workshop. No exam. Students may take the seminar for 1 or 2 credits; the second credit will require the writing of three reaction papers over the course of the semester or one longer paper at the semester’s end. Paper optional. Enrollment limited; permission of the instructor required. J. Rubenfeld.
    Course Selection: Students seeking admission should email a statement of interest to Professor Rubenfeld (jed.rubenfeld@yale.edu) no later than September 1 at 5 p.m..

    Note: The first class meeting will be on Wednesday, September 6.

    Location: SLB - FAC-DINING (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 15323
    Exam:
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30194-01
    • Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Seminar
    • Bhandary-Alexander
      Blank
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Seminar (30194) and Fieldwork (30195). 2 units, for each component, 4 units total. Students may elect credit/fail and must do so by the stated deadline each term. Students must be enrolled in the seminar and fieldwork components simultaneously. Students in the New Haven Legal Assistance Immigrant Rights Clinic (IRC) will represent immigrants and their organizations in court, before administrative agencies, and in the legislature. IRC is based at New Haven Legal Assistance (LAA), a historic non-profit civil legal services office whose mission is to secure justice for and to protect the rights of those residents of New Haven County unable to engage legal counsel.

    The clinic will be a legal resource for immigrant communities and their organizations. Through their advocacy and coursework, students in the clinic will learn to practice as legal services lawyers representing immigrants and their organizations. Students will represent clients in both immigration and employment law matters in federal courts. Community partners will refer cases to the clinic, and there will be no substantive area of law excluded from consideration.

    Referring community organizations will likely include Junta for Progressive Action, a non-profit service provider and advocacy organization (http://juntainc.org/en/); Unidad Latina en Acción, a grassroots membership-based community organization (https://ulanewhaven.org/); and Haven Health Clinic, a student-run primary care clinic in the Fair Haven neighborhood (http://www.havenfreeclinic.org/hfc/). Enrollment limited to eight. J. Bhandary-Alexander and D. Blank.

    Note: No drops will be permitted after students have confirmed their acceptance of a place, and not after the first seminar meeting.

    Course Bidding: In addition to ranking the seminar section of this clinic among experiential course selections, students should submit a one-to-two page personal statement and a CV by the close of the bidding period on June 22 at 4:30 p.m. Students who are accepted in the clinic seminar will also be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance (all versions); or Prosecution Externship.

    Location: NHLAO - CONF (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10284

    Close
    • 30195-01
    • Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Fieldwork
    • Bhandary-Alexander
      Blank
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Legal Assistance: Immigrant Rights Clinic: Fieldwork (30195). 2 units. Students must enroll simultaneously in the seminar and fieldwork components of this clinic. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to eight. J. Bhandary-Alexander and D. Blank.

    Course Bidding: Students who are accepted in the seminar component will be enrolled in the fieldwork component. It is not necessary to bid on the fieldwork component.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10285

    Close
    • 30204-01
    • Legal Assistance: Domestic Violence Clinic
    • Frontis
      Messali
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Legal Assistance: Domestic Violence Clinic (30204). 4 units. Students in the New Haven Legal Assistance Domestic Violence Clinic will represent survivors of domestic violence in Superior Court, in both civil and criminal matters, and also at the Connecticut legislature. The clinic will be based at the New Haven Legal Assistance Association (LAA), a non-profit legal services office, whose mission is to secure justice for and protect the rights of those low-income residents of New Hven County who would otherwise be unable to secure legal representation. The clinic will be a legal resource for survivors of domestic violence and their families. Through their advocacy and coursework, students in the clinic will learn to practice as legal services lawyers, representing vulnerable individuals. Students can expect to work both on individual cases, as well as on policy matters affecting the clinic's client population. While it is likely that students will be representing clients in restraining order matters, no substantive area of law will be excluded from consideration, including custody/visitation hearings. When clients present with multiple legal problems, students may represent them in housing, consumer, benefits, Title IX, or immigration matters. Enrollment limited to eight. Permission of the instructors required. C. Frontis and E. Messali.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should also submit a statement of interest and a CV by June 22 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note:First-day attendance is required.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in a LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project, Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: NHLAO - CONF (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10261

    Close
    • 30118-01
    • Legislative Advocacy Clinic
    • Pottenger
      Knopp
      Geballe
      Scalettar
    • Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Legislative Advocacy Clinic (30118). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail. With the states positioned to be focal points for progressive policy initiatives, students in this year-long clinical seminar will engage in high-level work on state-level policy projects requiring legislative action in cooperation with non-profit client organizations. Taking advantage of the close proximity of YLS to the State Capitol, students will have real-time opportunities to draft legislation, participate in client strategy discussions, research policy options and present testimony to standing committees of the Connecticut General Assembly. Past clinic clients have included CT Voices for Children, Common Cause, Planned Parenthood of Southern New England, Open Communities Alliance, the Center for Children’s Advocacy and other civil rights, public health and social justice organizations. Several possible Connecticut-based clients' projects will be available "off-the-shelf”. Or [s]tudents may propose their own projects. While preference is given in the student-selection process to Connecticut-based proposals, the Clinic may also accept students proposing to pursue priority projects in other states. Several students may "team up" and propose a collaborative project. The instructors must approve and participate in the final design of students' projects, and will assist with students' efforts to identify partner client organizations. National partner organizations, such as SiX Action and the Center on Budget Policy and Priorities, may participate by offering projects or support. Project work will be supplemented by class discussions about the legislative process and the role of the General Assembly in Connecticut politics, including guest presentations from current leaders in the State House and Senate, the Executive Branch and professional legislative staff. Because of the substantial advance planning required, students' "application proposals" should be submitted by the limited-enrollment deadline. Accepted students will need to coordinate with the instructors before registration, and their project designs should be approved during the first week of class. "Shopping" this Clinic is therefore discouraged. The Clinic seminar will meet most Friday mornings, and project supervision sessions also generally will be scheduled on Fridays. Students may enroll for two or three credits each semester; the Fall term is credit/fail. Enrollment limited to eight to twelve. J.L. Pottenger, Jr., S. Geballe, A. Knopp, and E. Scalettar.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is required. A no-drop policy will apply. There is no need to specify projects or issue preferences until after being "accepted" through the bidding process. There will be plenty of time to sort that out between now and the start of the fall term.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10025

    Close
    • 30172-01
    • Liman Project: Incarceration, Isolation, and Criminal Justice Reform
    • Resnik
      Fernandez
      Van Cleave
      Bell
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • paper required
    Expand

    Liman Projects: Incarceration, Isolation, and Criminal Justice Reform (30172). 2 units, credit/fail with a graded option. These projects enable students, working in groups, to learn about areas of law related to criminal justice reform, including law related to prosecution, detention and incarceration. Ongoing projects include studying how prisons use and regulate long-term isolation (sometimes called “solitary confinement,” “restricted housing,” or “administrative segregation”) and how to reduce the number of persons in isolation and the degrees of their isolation. The Liman Center has done two national surveys, and will continue to do data collection and analyses as well as more research on the law and policies related to isolation more generally. Students will an interest in or experience with quantitative work, data collection, and Qualtrics software are encouraged to join the class. In addition, the Liman Project published a monograph, called Rethinking Death Row, and based on student research; that volume examined the statutes and regulations related to putting capital-sentenced prisoners in isolation and provided windows into three correctional systems that do not isolate death-sentenced prisoners. Another project focuses on the role gender plays in incarceration, in terms of the ways in which women and men are classified, placed in facilities, and the programs and rules imposed. Again, the goals include research and reform. Students work in teams and meet regularly with supervisors, and, with permission, students may elect to write a related Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper for additional graded credit. Writing is required, as the projects always involve reports, power points, and research memos. The projects usually span more than one semester and have, on occasion, resulted in published articles. Permission of the instructors required. J. Resnik, K. Bell, L. Fernandez, and A. VanCleave.

    Course Bidding: Students should provide a brief statement of interest and a C.V. by June 22, at 4:30 p.m. Bidding on this clinic constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of the student's Law transcript to the instructors. The instructors will only consider the statement of interest, not the weighted preference, in determing who is accepted, so students should be clear about whether they are very interested in participating even if they are also in other clinics.

    Note: Regular meeting times will be determined after class schedules are set so that times work for as many as possible.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10150

    Close
    • 30178-01
    • Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project
    • Gerken
      Kwon
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Local Government in Action: San Francisco Affirmative Litigation Project (30178). 1 unit, with the option of additional units. This course will introduce students to local government lawyering. Working directly with attorneys from the Affirmative Litigation Task Force in the San Francisco City Attorney's Office, students will have an opportunity to brainstorm about potential projects, research the most promising ideas for lawsuits, assist in filing a case, or help litigate one already underway. The course will address both theoretical issues (What roles should cities play in our democracy? Can cities further the public interest through litigation?) and practical ones (city-state relations, standing issues). The first part of the course will acquaint students with broader legal and policy issues associated with affirmative litigation. The students will then break into independent working groups organized by subject area; the working groups will be designed to accommodate student interests and preferences. Each working group will either develop and propose a potential lawsuit, or assist in one of the City’s ongoing affirmative litigation cases. Students joining are expected to make a one-year commitment. Permission of the instructors required. H. Gerken and C. Kwon.

    Note: No drops will be permitted after the first class meeting.

    Course Selection: List this clinic among the experiential course selections. If you would like to enroll, please submit a short statement explaining your interest in SFALP and local government lawyering as well as your resume by June 22, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10063

    Close
    • 30173-01
    • Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic
    • Silk
      Bjerregaard
      Metcalf
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Fri 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic (30173). 4 units, credit/fail. Students will work on a variety of human rights projects, generally in support of advocacy efforts of human rights organizations. Projects are designed to give students practical experience with the range of activities in which lawyers engage to promote respect for human rights; to help students build the knowledge and skills necessary to be effective human rights lawyers; and to integrate the theory and practice of human rights. Class sessions will include an overview of basic human rights standards and their application; instruction in human rights research and writing skills; and critical examination of approaches to human rights advocacy and enforcement. The clinic will have one or more student directors. Enrollment limited to eighteen (total enrollment, including the advanced clinic). Permission of the instructors required. J.J. Silk, A. Bjerregaard, and H.R. Metcalf.

    Course Bidding Information: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students interested in applying for the Lowenstein Clinic should submit a resume and a short statement of interest through the bidding system no later than 4:30 p.m. on June 22. The statement should be no longer than one single-spaced page. It should primarily explain why you are interested in participating in the Clinic and should also include a brief summary of any experiences (employment, classes, volunteer activities) that would be relevant to international human rights work. Please indicate any foreign language ability. LL.M. students are eligible for the clinic but should consult with the instructors before enrolling.

    Note: Students may not drop the Lowenstein Clinic after the first day of the semester. Attendance at the first class is required.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Tue)
    SLB - 110 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10164

    Close
    • 30175-01
    • Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic
    • Schulz
      Balkin
      Langford
      Bloch-Wehba
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 3 or 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic (30175). 3 or 4 units, credit/fail for students in their first semester, graded for students in their second semester. Students in the clinic will work on all aspects of cases involving press freedom, open government, free speech, and related issues. Clients include investigative journalists, traditional and new media organizations, activists, advocacy organizations, researchers and academics. Pending matters typically include litigation under the First Amendment and Freedom of Information laws in both federal and state courts. The clinic's cases involve a diverse array of issues, focusing in particular on national security, surveillance, privacy, technology and government accountability. Students may also have the opportunity to engage in non-litigation advocacy and client counseling. The seminar will focus on substantive law, case discussions, skills training, and ethical issues. Students will have the opportunity to write related research papers. Enrollment limited to eighteen. Permission of the instructors required. D. Schulz, J.M. Balkin, H. Block-Webha, and J.T. Langford.

    Note: This clinic is open only to J.D. students.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who list this course among their experiential course selections should also submit a statement of interest and description of relevant experience in journalism or transparency work by June 22, at 4:30 p.m. Students should also indicate if they have previously applied to the course.

    Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is mandatory for admitted students and for those on the waiting list who wish to remain in consideration for admission if a place becomes available. Admitted students must confirm their participation in advance of the first class by a date designated by the instructors. A no-drop policy applies.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10060

    Close
    • 20097-01
    • Medical Legal Partnerships
    • Gluck
      Rusyn
      Kraschel
    • 2
    • Experiential Requirement
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Medical Legal Partnerships (20097). 2 units. This course will explore the challenges and benefits of medical legal partnerships (MLPs), with a particular focus on the five MLPs currently operating in New Haven. Enrollment is at the discretion of the instructor and dedicated work in a New Haven MLP is a co-requisite. Students will complete scholarly papers and meet to discuss both academic writings and the legal and operational challenges of MLPs. Meeting times to be arranged. Paper required. Permission of the instructor required. A.R. Gluck, K. Kraschel, and E. Rusyn.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10132

    Close
    • 20048-01
    • Modalities of Legal Scholarship
    • Elliott
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 to 3
    • Professional Skills
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Modalities of Legal Scholarship (20048). 2 or 3 credits. This seminar is about how to write legal scholarship. We consider various ideal types of articles, and what value they have. One focal point is the developing use of Alternative History techniques to study legal developments by exploring the roads not taken as legal doctrines develop. Other ideal types of legal scholarship to be considered include Treatises, Domestic Comparative Law, Comments, Case Notes, Book Reviews, Op-Eds, Blog Posts, Historical Analysis, Doctrinal Analysis, and Law and Economics. Attention will also be paid to principles of good legal writing. The course will be of particular interest to students who are considering a career in legal academia, but is also open to others who are interested in improving their legal writing. The instructor is an author of seven books and over seventy articles in legal and popular publications. Substantial Paper or Supervised Analytic Writing credit available. E.D.Elliott.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10124

    Close
    • 20137-01
    • Multilaterial Institutions in the Twenty-First Century
    • DiCarlo
    • Mon 2:30 PM-4:20 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Multilateral Institutions in the Twenty-First Century (20137). 2 units. The multilateral system developed after the Second World War has served as the foundation for peace and prosperity for over 70 years. Today's threats are, however, no longer limited to cross-border conflicts between states but increasingly involve actions by non-state actors, conflicts within states and global issues. This course will examine the relevance of these institutions to meeting these challenges. It also will examine their relevance to U.S. foreign policy interests and explore the relations among existing and emerging powers and regional groupings. Emphasis will be on security and political issues, primarily within the broader UN system. Readings include theoretical texts on multilateralism but also policy papers, newspaper articles, and international legal documents such as resolutions. The course is taught from the point of view of policy makers and practitioners. The objective is to stimulate thought and discussion regarding norms and mechanisms needed in the twenty-first century to strengthen multilateral efforts to combat the most serious threats of our day. Class attendance, oral presentation, 1 short paper, and 1 longer paper required. Permission of the instructor required. Limited to four Law students. Also GLBL 695a. R. DiCarlo.

    Note: This course will meet according to the Graduate School calendar. The first class meeting for Monday classes will be on Friday, September 1. The next class will be on Monday, September 11 and meet on Mondays thereafter.

    Location: WTS - A35 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 14373

    Close
    • 20548-01
    • Negotiating International Agreements: The Case of Climate Change
    • Biniaz
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Negotiating International Agreements: The Case of Climate Change (20548). 2 units. This seminar is a practical introduction to the negotiation of international agreements, with a focus on climate change. Students will learn about the cross-cutting features of international environmental agreements and, through the climate change lens, explore the process of negotiating agreements, the development of national positions, the advocacy of positions internationally, and the many ways in which differences among negotiating countries are resolved. The course will also examine the history and substance of the climate change regime, including, inter alia, the 1992 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, the 2009 Copenhagen Accord, and the 2015 Paris Agreement. Climate change issues in other international fora will also be discuss, e.g., the International Civil Aviation Organization's market-based mechanism to address CO2 emissions from international aviation. Grades will be based on a series of short non-research papers, as well as class participation. Enrollment limited to eighteen to twenty. Permission of the instructor required. S. Biniaz.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should submit a short statement of interest and a C.V. by June 22 at 4:30 p.m.

    Note: First-day attendance is required.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10048

    Close
    • 20229-01
    • Ownership: Seminar
    • Hansmann
      Gilson
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Ownership: Seminar (20229). 2 or 3 units. This seminar will explore a variety of issues in contemporary organizational law that center on the ownership of the organizations involved. Representative topics include legal problems related to: the nature of legal personhood; the varieties of organizational ownership (by investors of capital, employees, customers, suppliers, other stakeholders); the proliferation of corporate subsidiaries and their recognition as separate legal entities; nonprofits, SPVs, and other organizations without owners; impact investing; B Corporations and other forms of hybrid and social enterprise; the resilience of large family-controlled firms both abroad and at home (e.g., Google, Facebook); the turn to heavily contractual entity forms (e.g., LLCs, LPs, LLPs, LLLPs, statutory business trusts) for closely held firms; the death of the partnership and of unlimited liability for owners in general; the emerging role of financial intermediaries (e.g., mutual funds, pension funds, hedge funds, and private equity firms) in corporate control; the spread of equity participation without voting rights and the evolution of the limited partnership; government ownership of enterprise (including sovereign wealth funds); government as enterprise in itself. Students who write short papers will earn 2 units; students who complete Substantial Papers will earn a third unit. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of the instructors required. H. Hansmann and R. Gilson.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a C.V. or resume; listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release an unofficial copy of the Law School transcript to the instructors. Students may also submit a short statement of interest, if they choose.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10016

    Close
    • 20141-01
    • Philosophy of Law: Normative Jurisprudence
    • Yaffe
    • Thu 1:10 PM-2:35 PM
      Fri 1:10 PM-2:35 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Philosophy of Law: Normative Jurisprudence (20141). 3 units. This course will concern philosophical topics that arise in connection with particular areas of law. Such topics include the justification of criminal punishment; discrepancy in punishment of attempted and completed crimes; the relevance of ignorance of the law to criminal responsibility; self-defense and other forms of preventive violence; the rationale for double-jeopardy restrictions; the conception of justice of import to tort law; the concepts of causation and intention in tort law; the relationship between promises and contracts; the fundamental rationale for property rights; the grounds for and nature of the individualization of the reasonable person standard; the rationale for variations in standards of proof across areas of law. A selection of such topics will be examined through consideration of both philosophical essays written about them and legal materials that bear on them. Philosophy of Law: Analytical Jurisprudence is a companion to this course. The two together comprise a literacy course in the philosophy of law. They can be taken in either order or separately. Neither is a prerequisite for the other, but students seeking a strong background in philosophy of law are encouraged, but not required, to take both. Enrollment limited to twenty-five. Self-scheduled examination. Also PHIL 715a. G. Yaffe.

    Location: SLB - 128 (Thu)
    SLB - 128 (Fri)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10180
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 12001-A
    • Procedure I
    • Eskridge
    • Mon 10:30 AM-11:45 AM
      Wed 10:30 AM-11:45 AM
      Thu 8:30 AM-9:45 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Wed)
    SLB - 129 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10278
    Exam: 12/15/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.5 hour(s)

    Close
    • 12001-B
    • Procedure I
    • Gluck
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 129 (Wed)
    SLB - 129 (Mon)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10279
    Exam: 12/15/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 12001-C
    • Procedure I
    • Koh
    • Mon 8:20 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:20 AM-10:00 AM
      Fri 8:20 AM-10:00 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 129 (Mon)
    SLB - 129 (Wed)
    SLB - 129 (Fri)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10280
    Exam: 12/15/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3.25 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20207-01
    • Property
    • Zhang
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Property (20207). 4 units. This course will study the laws of property, its objectives and its institutions. It will investigate how property rights and institutions affect resources, prosperity, fairness, freedom, community, and the sometimes conflicting interests of individuals, groups, and government, in specific applications such as land, possessions, environmental resources, the family, and the self. It will cover issues such as acquisition, exclusion, trespass and nuisance, transfer, estates and future interests, covenants and easements, landlord-tenant and housing law, and compensation for government takings of property. Attention will be paid, in largely equal doses, to both the legal doctrine and its underlying socioeconomic, political, and moral rationales. Self-scheduled examination. T. Zhang.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Mon)
    SLB - 122 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10142
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20013-01
    • Property
    • Priest
    • Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Property (20013). 4 units. This course will cover the legal doctrines and other substantive content of the basic Property course with enrollment limited to 15 and a required research paper. The Property course inquires into a pervasive set of human institutions--the arrangements for getting, controlling, using, transferring, and forfeiting resources in the world around us. The course will begin by exploring what property regimes are and the range of purposes they might serve, and then move through the topics of acquisition, transfer, shared interest, and limitations on property. While the main focus will be property in land, the class will discuss the implications of property in other resources, such as wild animals, body parts, water, and information. The course will also examine recording and other notice-giving devices, interests in land over time, easements and deed restrictions, planned communities and "private government," and takings doctrine. Students will develop research topics with the assistance of the professor. Supervised Analytic Writing and Substantial Paper credit are available. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. Self-scheduled examination and paper required. C. Priest.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10111
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20202-01
    • Property, Social Justice, and the Environment
    • Rose
    • Wed 3:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Property, Social Justice, and the Environment (20202). 2 or 3 units. Private property is sometimes cast as the villain in social and environmental problems, but sometimes it is cast as the solution to the same problems. This seminar will explore the relationship of property to social and environmental concerns in the context of several past and present controversies over property rights, and particularly in the light of current concerns with climate change and environmental skepticism. We will begin with some basic theories about the “commons” problem and the ways that property rights do or do not evolve to address that problem. Time permitting, other topics may include: land rights; land reform and development projects (primarily less developed countries); wildlife and fisheries management (global); water management (United States and global); tradable pollution rights; carbon trading schemes; property aspects of climate change adaptation; free market environmentalism and private land use restrictions (conservationist or exclusionary?); and indigenous land claims and claims to intellectual property. While we will search for common themes about the range, capacities and limitations of property regimes, theoretical purity should not be expected in this overview; moreover, topics may change in response to particular student interest. The class will meet once a week for a longish session (3 hours) during the first seven to nine weeks of the term. Paper required; may be reflective (2 units) or research (3 units). Enrollment limited. C.M. Rose.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10031

    Close
    • 20457-01
    • Property: Individual Research
    • Ellickson
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Property: Individual Research (20457). 3 units. The instructor will separately supervise up to six students who wish to write a paper on a property topic. To receive credit for satisfying the Supervised Analytic Writing requirement, a student must devote two terms of work to the paper. Enrollment limited to six. R.C. Ellickson.


    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10007

    Close
    • 20535-01
    • Proportionality in Constitutional Law
    • Barak
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Proportionality in Constitutional Law (20535). 2 units. In many countries (e.g., Canada, Germany, Spain, Brazil, Israel), and under some International documents (e.g., the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms), the regular legislature can take action affecting constitutional rights that are part of the Bill of Rights, so long as such effect is proportional (that is, suitable and necessary to achieve legitimate government ends and properly balanced). This seminar will look into the concept of proportionality, its scope and its rationales. We shall do so on a comparative law basis. We shall compare it with U.S. jurisprudence, while trying to see whether constitutional rights are better protected by the U.S. method of categorization or by a proportionality analysis. We shall follow the development of proportionality in recent U.S. Constitutional Law and evaluate its place in the constitutional scheme of things. This course will meet during the first half of the term. Paper required. Enrollment capped at twenty-five. A. Barak.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Wed)
    SLB - 124 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10047

    Close
    • 30193-01
    • Prosecution Externship and Instruction
    • Stith
      Perry
      Nagala
    • Wed 3:30 PM-5:20 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Prosecution Externship and Instruction (30193). 2 or 3 units, credit/fail. Students in this clinical externship will assist state or federal prosecutors with their responsibilities, and surrounding cities or in Bridgeport; the federal caseload is varied, including misdemeanors, felonies, or specialized areas such as violent crime, white collar crime, drug trafficking, or appellate work. The State’s Attorney for New Haven, which also has a varied but faster-paced docket, can take one or two student placements. All students are required to attend weekly class sessions, which will range from discussions of assigned readings to field trips to jails and the medical examiner's office. Students will keep journals and time records. Placements at the U.S. Attorney's Office must be arranged at least four months in advance, to allow time for security clearance procedures. Students also apply for the State's Attorney during the previous term, though interviews may take place after the student has been accepted into the Externship program. Enrollment is limited and permission of the instructor is required. However, the eearly application process and the involvement of outside agencies remove this clinic from the usual sign-up process for limited enrollment courses. Selection for this course takes place before limited-enrollment course bidding. K. Stith, S.V. Nagala, and A. Perry.

    Course Bidding Information: Select this course as your lowest preference among experiential course selections. Open only to students who have been pre-selected to participate. Do not select this course during pre-registration if you are not one of those students.

    Note: As part of the application process, students submit statements of interest; interview with the AUSAs who run the classroom portion of the course; interview with the New Haven District Attorney's Office for those interested in the state prosecutor's office.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Note: The first class meeting will be on September 6, 3:30-5:20 p.m., in room 122 at the Law School. Thereafter, the class will meet at the U.S. Attorney's Office.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10034

    Close
    • 20118-01
    • Public Education and the Law: Seminar
    • Garfinkel
    • Thu 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Public Education and the Law: Seminar (20118). 2 or 3 units. This seminar is about the law that governs public elementary and secondary education in the United States. We will focus on the substantive and procedural rights of students, parents, and teachers. The course will examine equal educational opportunity in the context of race, ethnicity, sex and gender, wealth, and disability; and the application of the First and Fourth Amendments in the schools. It is not a survey of education law or a course about educational policy. Students taking the course for 2 units must submit approximately 25 pages of papers (about 6500 words) of work that may be apportioned among reaction papers and essays on the topics covered in the readings and discussions. Students taking the course for 3 units must submit approximately 10 pages (about 2500 words) of reaction papers and commentaries and a research paper based, at least substantially, on independent research. The research paper should be approximately 25 pages (about 6250 words) long. Thirty percent of each student's grade will be based upon class participation. Enrollment limited to fifteen. W.I. Garfinkel.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10050

    Close
    • 20040-01
    • Public Order of the World Community: A Contemporary International Law
    • Reisman
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Public Order of the World Community: A Contemporary International Law (20040). 4 units. This introduction to contemporary international law will study the role of authority in the decision-making processes of the world community, at the constitutive level where international law is made and applied and where the indispensable institutions for making decisions are established and maintained, as well as in the various sectors of the public order that is established. Consideration will be given to formal as well as operational prescriptions and practice with regard to the participants in this system (states, intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations, political parties, pressure groups, multinational enterprises, other private associations, private armies and gangs, and individuals); the formal and informal arenas of interaction; the allocation of control over and regulation of the resources of the planet; the protection of people and the regulation of nationality; and the allocation among states of jurisdiction to make and apply law. In contrast to more traditional approaches, which try to ignore the role of power in this system, that role will be candidly acknowledged, and the problems and opportunities it presents will be explored. Special attention will be given to (1) theory; (2) the establishment, transformation, and termination of actors; (3) control of access to and regulation of resources, including environmental prescriptions; (4) nationality and human rights, and (5) the regulation of armed conflict. Enrollment will be capped at thirty. Scheduled examination or paper option. Also GLBL 588a. W.M. Reisman.

    Location: SLB - 113 (Mon)
    SLB - 113 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10026
    Exam: 12/12/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20203-01
    • Race, Class and Punishment: Seminar
    • Forman
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Race, Class, and Punishment: Seminar (20203). 4 units, each term. This will be in part a traditional academic seminar. Students will begin the seminar component with readings analyzing mass incarceration's historical roots, and will then turn to examine the impact of punitive criminal justice policies, emerging efforts to reform the current system. The assigned reading will be substantial, and will come from a wide variety of sources, including history, sociology, political science, criminology, and law.

    Alongside the academic seminar will be a policy/advocacy/legal component. In this aspect of the course, students will participate in efforts to replace harsh criminal laws and policies with more humane, just, and effective alternatives. Students will work on research projects selected by the instructor from among those presented by nonprofit groups working on criminal and juvenile justice reform. Students will also have the opportunity to meet attorneys, activists, and policymakers who are directly involved in the legal and policy debates on which the class is working.

    Substantial Paper or Supervised Analytic Writing credit is available. This seminar is yearlong and students must commit to both semesters. Open only to J.D. students. Enrollment limited to fourteen. Permission of the instructor required. J. Forman, Jr.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should submit a C.V. and statement of interest of no more than 500 words by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. Listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of the student's unofficial transcript to the instructor.

    In your statement of interest, please indicate your (1) reason or reasons for wanting to take the class; (2) background in criminal justice issues; and (3) background in empirical research. Despite asking about (2) and (3), no background in criminal justice issues or empirical research is required for admission to this class. Professor Forman's goal is to attract a mix of students from a range of backgrounds.

    Note: Students must attend the first day of class. Students may not drop after the first day of class.

    Location: SLB - 110 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10049

    Close
    • 20084-01
    • Race and Gender in Corporate Law and Governance
    • Dhir
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Race and Gender in Corporate Law and Governance (20084). 3 units. This seminar will explore the intersections of race and gender with corporate law, governance, and theory. The confluence of these fields, to date, has garnered little attention. Traditionally, the disciplines have lived in remote houses and have had few occasions to speak to one another. And yet, over thirty years ago two feminist scholars argued that “the impacts of corporate cultures are not…marginal to the experiences of women” and bemoaned “the relationship between patriarchal culture and the development of business corporations.” And as noted by a leading scholar of racial justice, “[r]ace suffuses all bodies of law…even the purest of corporate law questions within the most unquestionably Anglo scholarly paradigm.”

    In addressing these intersections, topics such as the following will be considered:
    (i) race and gender in the corporate law curriculum;
    (ii) feminist engagement with corporate law doctrine and theory;
    (iii) critical race engagement with law and economics and corporate law theory;
    (iv) corporate board composition and the implications of homogeneous boards for organizational performance and social justice;
    (v) legal reform strategies aimed at addressing corporate board homogeneity; and
    (vi) the use of corporate law mechanisms to address gender and race issues.

    Significant paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen (10 YLS students and 5 SOM students). Also MGT 678a. A. Dhir.

    Note: No drops will be approved after the open add/drop period. Attendance at the first class meeting is required. The use of laptop computers (or other similar electronic note-taking devices) is not permitted. The course will follow the Law School calendar.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10250

    Close
    • 50100-03
    • RdgGrp:CntmprryIsssLglSchlrshp
    • Alstott
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15440

    Close
    • 50100-01
    • RdgGrp:CongressinConstnlSystem
    • Priest
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15378

    Close
    • 50100-06
    • RdgGrp:Law&U.S.-ChinaRelations
    • Gewirtz
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15677

    Close
    • 50100-04
    • RdgGrp:LawStrategyUtopianTrdtn
    • Alstott
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15441

    Close
    • 50100-05
    • RdgGrp:LawyrngSpprtPltclMvmnts
    • Rosenbloom
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15442

    Close
    • 50100-02
    • RdgGrp:TopicsEntrtnmntMediaLaw
    • Chua
    • 1
    • Supervised Research/ Reading Group
    • open enrollment
    • not applicable
    Expand


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 15439

    Close
    • 20459-01
    • Reading the Constitution: Method and Substance
    • Amar
    • Mon 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Reading the Constitution: Method and Substance (20459). 4 units. An advanced constitutional law course focusing intently on the Constitution itself (as distinct from the case law interpreting it, sometimes quite loosely). The course will begin by studying the document itself in exquisite detail, Article by Article, and Amendment by Amendment. The main text for this segment of the course will be Amar, America's Constitution: A Biography (2005). The course will then canvass various methods of constitutional interpretation (associated, for example, with writings by Ackerman, Amar, Balkin, Black, Bobbitt, Ely, Tribe, Rubenfeld, Siegel, and Strauss). Open only to J.D. students. Self-scheduled examination. A.R. Amar.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Mon)
    SLB - 109 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10112
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20246-01
    • Readings in Comparative Administrative Law: Public Law and Public Policy Making
    • Rose-Ackerman
    • Wed 12:10 PM-1:00 PM
    • 1
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Readings in Comparative Administrative Law: Public Law and Public Policy Making (20246). 1 unit, credit/fail. A reading course based on selected chapters in Comparative Administrative Law, edited by Susan Rose-Ackerman, Peter Lindseth, and Blake Emerson. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to twelve. S. Rose-Ackerman.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12896

    Close
    • 20113-01
    • Reducing Mass Incarceration: Seminar
    • Duke
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Reducing Mass Incarceration: Seminar (20113). 2 or 3 units. This seminar will discuss readings on possible sources of reform aimed at reducing mass incarceration in the United States. These will include drug prohibition, pretrial detention, rehabilitative alternatives to jail and prison sentences, length of prison sentences, probation and parole, prison conditions, collateral consequences of conviction, and others. Students will write papers on these or other relevant subjects. Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit is available. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fourteen. Permission of the instructor required. S.B. Duke.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should submit a resume and a statement explaining their interest in the subject by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. Listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of the unofficial transcript to the instructor.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10174

    Close
    • 20540-01
    • Regulating Emerging Technologies
    • Mashaw
      Harfst
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Regulating Emerging Technologies (20540). 2 or 3 units. Contemporary society is awash in emerging technologies whose velocity of development, disruptive scope, and far reaching social, economic, and cultural effects are arresting. Synthetic biology, nanotechnologies, artificial intelligence, quantum computing, 3-dimensional printing, robotics, drones, and genome editing are but a few examples.

    This torrent of innovation poses a dilemma for the regulatory state. Inaction may place public health, safety, and other cherished values at risk; yet premature intervention may stifle innovation and the benefits it otherwise would confer. Traditional regulatory tools appear problematic in this context. Notice and comment rulemaking, cost benefit analysis, and judicial review, for example, all presume the application of law and reason to meticulously established facts. But the “facts” of emerging technology –- its costs, benefits, and other impacts, are just that: indeterminate, elusive and evolving. How then should regulators mediate risk and innovation along a continuum of uncertainty in this dynamic environment?

    This seminar will proceed in two phases. First, we will briefly examine how the law has adapted to earlier technological innovations, such as the railroad, steamboat, and electricity. This line of inquiry will be followed by a more extensive examination of the regulatory implications of innovative technologies that are only now emerging, including some of those cited above.

    The second phase of the seminar will take a deeper dive into a single case study of emerging technology today: the self-driving car. Highly automated (HAV) and autonomous (AV) vehicles have the potential to transform vehicle safety regulation at the federal, state and local levels, the application of tort and products liability doctrine, the nature and regulation of motor vehicle insurance, the regulation of urban land use, the finance of local governments, and the balance between public and private transportation (indeed the understanding of those categories), among other phenomena. We will explore how the law might adapt to the HAV/AV revolution, and in that context address broader issues of the dynamics of legal change and the design of regulatory regimes. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fourteen. J.L. Mashaw and D. Harfst.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10023

    Close
    • 20297-01
    • Regulation of Energy Extraction
    • Elliott
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2 or 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Regulation of Energy Extraction (20297). 2 or 3 units. This comparative risk course will explore the troubled intersection between energy and environmental policies. We will consider a diverse range of regulatory approaches to minimize adverse environmental effects of various forms of energy development. These include emerging issues regarding hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) in the United States and European Union; regulation of off-shore drilling and lessons from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill; liability for natural resources and other damages from oil spills under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (OPA90); the Fukushima, Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear accidents; applicability of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to oil and coal leases on federal lands; the Endangered Species Act; visual pollution and other issues relating to windfarms; coal mine disasters; mountaintop mining and the Mine Safety Act; and tailings piles and the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA). The class will conclude by considering how concerns about climate change may affect the future of energy development. No prerequisites. Supervised Analytic Writing or Substantial Paper credit available. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. E.D. Elliott.

    Note: No more than three absences are permitted.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10123
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20213-01
    • The Regulation of Labor Relations
    • Becker
    • Wed 3:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    The Regulation of Labor Relations (20213). 3 units. This course will examine the law governing employee organizing, union representation, and collective bargaining in the United States. The primary focus will be on the private sector and thus on the National Labor Relations Act of 1935, as amended, but the course will also examine key legal controversies in public section labor relations. Self-scheduled examination. C. Becker.

    Location: SLB - 129 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10073
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 20051-01
    • Regulatory Design: Seminar
    • Camacho
    • Wed 10:00 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Regulatory Design: Seminar (20051). 2 units. In the U.S. and abroad, government institutions have been experiencing an intense period of experimentation in regulation. International, national, and local government institutions are being transformed in areas as diverse as food safety, environmental law, securities regulation, education, national security, land use, and criminal justice, through an ever-increasing variety of innovations that fundamentally change the way society makes decisions. These transformations are altering the way lawyers interact with agencies, politicians, and other government officials on behalf of clients.

    After examining the traditional prescriptive model of regulation, this course will explore a range of recent public sector innovations and ways of understanding government organization. These include tools such as information disclosure; cost-benefit analysis; taxes, charges, and tradeable permits; industry self-regulation; negotiated and collaborative innovations in decision-making; and privatization and outsourcing. It will also include attempts to (re)allocate governmental authority and/or reorganize the relationship between regulators. In these contexts, the course will examine the nature and purpose of regulation, as well as concerns with its uneasy interface with democracy, agency expertise, economics, and science. The course will place particular emphasis on recent approaches to environmental regulatory innovation because of the especially vigorous experimentation in this area, but will explore regulatory initiatives elsewhere as well. Paper required. Enrollment limited to eighteen. A.E. Camacho.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10088

    Close
    • 20572-01
    • Religion and the Constitution(s)
    • Weil
    • Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Religion and the Constitution(s) (20572). 2 units. Modernity and liberal democracy are consonant with religious liberty, freedom of conscience, free speech, and different degrees of separation between religion and politics. But the way these principles are organized and interpreted varies across and within different national constitutional and legal regimes. Most recently, religious revivals and the development of religious diversity have challenged traditional arrangements. This course will examine the legal and constitutional status of religion in the United States in light of this evolving global climate, taking account of both different national contexts (e.g., the U.S., Canada, Europe, Asia, and Latin America) as well as the places, discourses and topoi in which these new challenges occur (the public sphere, schools and universities, corporations, or the military; regarding prayers, religious symbols, creationism, state subsidies, etc.). Self-scheduled examination or paper option. P. Weil.

    Location: SLB - K190C (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10143
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30217-01
    • Representing Start-Ups
    • Breeze
      Goldberg
      Lynch
    • Thu 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Representing Start-Ups (30217). 2 units, credit/fail. This course is intended to give students a thorough look at legal issues faced by start-up companies. We will follow a semi-hypothetical company throughout its lifecycle, with the students creating its capitalization table and updating it through several rounds of financing and an acquisition. We will focus on corporate matters and have several sessions on related matters including intellectual property and executive compensation. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to twenty. W. Breeze, D.A. Goldberg, and C.L. Lynch.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among experiential course selections, students should submit a short statement of interest explaining why they are interested in taking the class by June 22, 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10260

    Close
    • 30229-01
    • Reproductive Rights and Justice Project: Fieldwork
    • Smith
      Kraschel
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Reproductive Rights and Justice Project: Fieldwork (30229). 2 units, graded or credit/fail at student option. Simultaneous enrollment in Reproductive Rights and Justice Project: Seminar required. Permission of the instructors required. P. Smith and K. Kraschel.

    Course Bidding: Students who are accepted in the seminar section will be automatically enrolled in the fieldwork section. It is not necessary to bid on the fieldwork section.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 12457

    Close
    • 30226-01
    • Reproductive Rights and Justice Project: Seminar
    • Smith
      Kraschel
    • Wed 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Reproductive Rights and Justice Project: Seminar (30226) and Fieldwork (30229). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each section (4 units total). The RRJP seminar and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. Students in this project will gain firsthand experience in litigation and timely and strategic advocacy in a highly contested area of the law, confronting knotty procedural problems as well as substantive constitutional law questions in an area where established doctrine is under siege. Students will advocate for clients who are often vilified by opponents as well as some members of the press and judiciary, learning the vital importance of client confidentiality, as well as the impact of political movement strategy and management of press and public messaging.

    For litigation matters, students will work in small teams in cases being handled by attorneys at Planned Parenthood Federation of America, the Center for Reproductive Rights, or the ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project. Projects and case assignments will vary according to the posture of the cases, but all will require top-notch legal research, analysis and writing, as well as strategy meetings with team members. Some cases will involve trial level work, including informal fact development, drafting pleadings, discovery, motion practice, and negotiations. Other matters will involve appellate briefing.

    Students will also have an opportunity to develop non-litigation skills by undertaking non-litigation matters involving legislative and regulatory advocacy, public education, and strategic planning and legal review of legislative proposals, at the federal, state, and local level. Clinic members will work with course instructors and local and national groups. Students may also work on additional projects involving preparation for future litigation on the state and national level or other policy projects promoting access to reproductive health care, the details of which cannot be disclosed because they involve privileged matters.

    Students will be assigned in small teams to work on matters and caseloads will vary depending on the number of credits elected by the students. Supervision of the litigation will be conducted by the attorneys at the national organizations, with assistance from course instructors. Non-litigation matters will be supervised by the course instructors with input from those at national organizations where appropriate. Open only to U.S. J.D. students. Enrollment limited to eight to twelve. Permission of the instructors required. P.J. Smith and K. Kraschel.

    Course Bidding: Students should submit a statement of interest and a copy of their resumes by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. Students may also send statements and resumes to Professor Smith (priscilla.smith@yale.edu) and Kraschel (katie.kraschel@gmail.com). Priority will be given to applicants with past experience in the substantive law of reproductive rights and justice, either through coursework or work experience, as well as to some with a demonstrated commitment to this as a new practice area. All other things being equal, preference will be given to those qualified students who rank the clinic as their first choice. Students should also indicate whether they want to take the course for a grade or credit/fail.

    Location: SLB - K290A (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 12456

    Close
    • 20662-01
    • Rethinking Sovereignty: Human Rights and Globalization
    • Benhabib
    • Thu 10:30 AM-12:30 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Rethinking Sovereignty: Human Rights and Globalization (20662). 3 units. The crises of sovereignty and the end of sovereignty have been discussed in law, political science, and philosophy. Post-nationalist, cosmopolitan, as well as neo-liberal critics of sovereignty abound. This course will discuss alternative models of sovereignty, ranging from democratic iterations to popular constitutionalism, and will consider the implications of these models for the definition and enforcement of rights. Recent development in the u.S. and the European Union law regarding immigrations and refugee issues will be a special focus. Readings will include Hobbes, Kant, Schmitt, Arendt, Kelsen, Habermas, Waldron, Walker and Benveniste. This seminar will meet according to the Yale Graduate School calendar. Paper required. Enrollment limited to six Law students and permission of the instructor required. Also PHIL 656a/PLSC 605a/PLSC 292a. S. Benhabib.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission of the instructor selections, students should submit a brief paragraph about their background in political and legal theory and a C.V. by June 22 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: RKZ - 202 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10228

    Close
    • 30190-01
    • Rule of Law Clinic
    • Koh
      Metcalf
      Wishnie
      Spector
    • Fri 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
      Tue 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 4
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Rule of Law Clinic (30190). 4 units. This clinic will focus on maintaining the rule of law and human rights in four areas: national security law (torture, drones, Guantanamo, travel ban); antidiscrimination (against religious and ethnic groups); democracy promotion; and climate change (maintaining U.S. commitments under the Paris Agreement, in the face of prospective withdrawal). We will divide the work into these work streams, and pick discrete projects (some litigation, some advocacy, some other kinds of work) where we think our work product can contribute meaningfully to preservation of the rule of law. Preference to U.S. J.D. students. Enrollment limited and permission of the instructors required. H.H. Koh, M.J. Wishnie, H.R. Metcalf, and P. Spector.

    Course Bidding: In addition to ranking this clinic among experiential course selections, students should submit a statement of interest and a resume by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. Students do not have to bid the clinic first so long as they indicate in the statement of interest that they would accept a place in the clinic, if offered. Nor do students have to have prerequisite experience in the three project areas, although such experience is preferred.

    Note: The regular class meetings will be on Tuesday. The Friday meeting times are for make-up classes. The class will not meet every Friday but only on those dates announced by the instructors.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Fri)
    SLB - FAC-DINING (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10170

    Close
    • 20646-01
    • Separation of Powers and Executive Branch Legal Interpretation: Seminar
    • Rodriguez
    • Wed 1:10 PM-3:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Separation of Powers and Executive Branch Legal Interpretation: Seminar (20646). 2 units. This course will explore the parameters of the executive-congressional relationship, with a special focus on the mechanisms through which the Executive Branch engages in legal interpretation, both of the Constitution and of statutes. In addition to examining the caselaw that structures the relationship between the political branches, we will consider how the Executive conceptualizes and implements its "Take Care" function, through its own forms of constitutional interpretation, in rulemaking, and in the exercise of prosecutorial discretion. We also will explore how the congressional oversight and appropriations processes affect the relationship between the branches. Among the specific topics to be studied will be the scope of the President's foreign affairs and national security powers and Congress's efforts to limit those powers; the President's authority to decline to defend and enforce federal laws; and the roles of the Office of Legal Counsel and the inter-agency process, particularly in the mediation of conflict within the Executive Branch. Prerequisites: Constitutional Law I and either Administrative Law, Legislation, or a course on the regulatory state. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. C.Rodriguez.

    Location: SLB - 111 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10138

    Close
    • 20568-01
    • Sexuality, Gender, Health, and Human Rights
    • Miller
    • Thu 9:25 AM-11:15 AM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Sexuality, Gender, Health, and Human Rights (20568). 2 units. This course will explore the application of human rights perspectives and practices to issues in regard to sexuality, gender, and health. Through reading, interactive discussion, paper presentation, and occasional outside speakers, students will learn the tools and implications of applying rights and law to a range of sexuality and health-related topics. The overall goal is twofold: to engage students in the world of global sexual health and rights policy making as a field of social justice and public health action; and to introduce them to conceptual tools that can inform advocacy and policy formation and evaluation. Class participation, a book review, an OpEd, and a final paper required. This course will follow the calendar of the Graduate School. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required.Also GLBL 529a/SBS 585a. A.M. Miller.

    Location: WLH - 001 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 13390

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    • 20412-01
    • Six Books on Law, Religion, and Culture
    • Carter
    • Thu 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Six Books on Law, Religion, and Culture (20412). 3 units. This seminar will meet (roughly) every other week, and we shall do what the title implies: we will read, and discuss in detail, six books relating, directly or (in a couple of cases) indirectly to law and religion. The course is not designed to teach the law of the church and state, but no particular background is assumed. Readings will likely include, among others, Stephen Nissenbaum, The Battle for Christmas; Wole Soyinka, Death and the King's Horseman; and Peter Charles Hoffer, The Salem Witchcraft Trials, in addition to several sermons from the Abolitionist era. Paper required on a topic in law and religion. Enrollment limited to about eight. S. L. Carter.

    Location: SLB - K190A (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10121

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    • 20339-01
    • Social Science and Criminal Justice Reform: Seminar
    • Tyler
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Social Science and Criminal Justice Reform (20339). 3 units. A core premise of evidence informed criminal justice policies is to create policies whose effectiveness is supported by research. This seminar will look at recent research in areas related to reform in the police; the courts and jails/prisons. Several areas are the focus: trust in law and legal authorities; the role of explicit and implicit bias in criminal justice; biases in perceiving and interpreting experiences; adolescent psychology; and efforts at restoration and reconciliation. The seminar will consider what empirical research findings in each area say and examine their possible application to reforms in the criminal justice system. Paper required. Enrollment capped at twenty. Also PSYC. T.R. Tyler.

    Location: SLB - 112 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10140

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    • 20104-01
    • Social Justice
    • Ackerman
    • Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam with paper option
    Expand

    Social Justice (20104). 4 units. An examination of contemporary theories, together with an effort to assess their practical implications. Authors this year will include Peter Singer, Richard Posner, John Rawls, Robert Nozick, Michael Walzer, Marion Young, Avishai Margalit, and Cass Sunstein. Topics: animal rights, the status of children and the principles of educational policy, the relation of market justice to distributive justice, the status of affirmative action, and the rise of technocracy. Self-scheduled examination or paper option. Also PLSC 553a/PHIL 718a. B. Ackerman.

    Note: This course is not open to undergraduates.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Mon)
    SLB - 108 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10029
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 48 hour(s)

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    • 30180-01
    • Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic
    • Greenhouse
      Pincus
      Rothfeld
      Kimberly
      Hughes
    • Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
    • 3
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Supreme Court Advocacy (30180). 6 units (3 fall, 3 spring). This course will furnish the opportunity to combine hands-on clinical work with seminar discussion of Supreme Court decision making and advocacy. It will begin with several sessions analyzing the Court as an institution, focusing on the practicalities of how the Court makes its decisions and how lawyers present their cases. Thereafter, students will work on a variety of actual cases before the Court, preparing petitions for certiorari and merits briefs. Students will work under the supervision of Yale faculty and experienced Supreme Court practitioners. The course will be a two-term offering and the work product may be used to satisfy the Substantial Paper requirement. The course demands a significant time investment and is not recommended for students with other time-intensive commitments. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of instructors required. L. Greenhouse, P. Hughes, M. Kimberly, A. Pincus, and C. Rothfeld.

    Note: This course is open only to J.D. students.

    Note: In addition to the regular class times, students must keep Tuesday afternoons free from 3:00 in order to work with our practitioners.

    Course Bidding Information: Students admitted cannot drop during the open add/drop period. In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, any student wishing to be considered for admission must submit by June 22 at 4:30 p.m.: (1) a CV; (2) a writing sample (preferably involving legal writing); and (3) a one-page statement (a) addressing the nature of his or her interest in the course and (b) furnishing assurance that he or she will be able to satisfy the significant time commitments associated with the course; (4) bidding on this course constitutes authorization for the Registrar's Office to release a copy of your Law transcript to the instructors. In connection with (3)(b), applicants should indicate their anticipated course schedule for the 2017-2018 academic year, including their participation in other clinical offerings; any anticipated journal work; and anticipated writing to be completed independently of this course (including any papers that would satisfy the SAW or Substantial requirements). Significant academic or journal commitments outside of this course will certainly not be considered disqualifying, but will be taken into account in determining an applicant’s suitability for admission to the course. Other factors that will be considered include whether the applicant has already completed his or her SAW requirement. The submission of an application also constitutes consent to review of the applicant's Law School transcript. Note: Accepted students will be requested to limit class and other commitments after 3 p.m. on Tuesdays to ensure availability for team meetings.

    Location: SLB - 124 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10014

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    • 30141-01
    • Temporary Restraining Order Project
    • Wizner
      Frontis
      Messali
    • 1
    • Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Temporary Restraining Order Project (30141). 1 unit, credit/fail. The Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) Project is a field placement program in which law students provide assistance to domestic violence victims applying for Temporary Restraining Orders in the Superior Court for the New Haven Judicial District, under the supervision of attorneys from the New Haven Legal Assistance Association and the Court Clerk’s Office. The TRO Project aims to increase access to justice for self-represented parties and provide opportunities for law students to learn about the law of domestic violence and court procedures for protecting individuals in abusive relationships. Students will be able to develop practical skills, including intake, interviewing, drafting of affidavits and other application documents, informing applicants about court procedures, and assisting applicants in navigating the judicial process. Open only to J.D. students. Permission of the instructors required. Enrollment limited to fifteen. S. Wizner, C. Frontis, and E. Messali.


    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 12448

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    • 13001-01
    • Torts I
    • Calabresi
    • Fri 10:10 AM-11:00 AM
      Tue 4:15 PM-6:30 PM
      Wed 4:15 PM-6:30 PM
      Thu 4:15 PM-6:30 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 112 (Fri)
    CH157 - CONF 17FLR (Tue)
    CH157 - CONF 17FLR (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10283
    Exam: 12/11/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

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    • 13001-A
    • Torts I
    • Kysar
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 127 (Tue)
    SLB - 127 (Thu)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10281
    Exam: 12/11/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 13001-B
    • Torts I
    • Witt
    • Mon 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
      Wed 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    Location: SLB - 127 (Mon)
    SLB - 127 (Wed)
    Grade mode: credit/fail
    CRN: 10282
    Exam: 12/11/2017 at 9:00 AM
    Questions are not available online
    Name or Id: Id
    Length: 3 hour(s)

    Close
    • 20648-01
    • Transnational Corporations and Human Rights
    • Dhir
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 3
    • -
    • limited enrollment
    • paper required
    Expand

    Transnational Corporations and Human Rights (20648). 3 units. Apple’s use of child labor; Goldcorp's operations in Guatemala; the complicity of Dow Chemical/Union Carbide in the Bhopal chemical disaster; Shell’s involvement in the executions of activists protesting the company’s environmental and development policies in Nigeria. These are just a few examples of alleged corporate malfeasance that have emerged on the international stage.

    The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the debate concerning the accountability of transnational corporations that are complicit in rights-violating activities. At the international level, there has been a striking new strategy in the protection of human rights: a transition from focusing solely on rights violations committed by governments to a detailed examination of transnational corporate conduct. Indeed, it has now become trite to say that particular corporations have directly or indirectly participated in violations of human rights.

    To address the fundamental question of whether corporations should in fact be socially responsible, the seminar will begin with an introduction to corporate theory. Students will then explore some of the key issues in the debate. Namely, whether transnational corporations can properly be included under the international law of state responsibility; mechanisms for self-regulation (e.g., voluntary corporate codes of conduct); the utility of the U.S. Alien Tort Statute; the advantages and disadvantages of U.N. initiatives (e.g., the work of the former U.N. Special Representative on Business and Human Rights); and the relevance of domestic corporate and securities law mechanisms (e.g., shareholder proposals and social disclosure).

    The course will provide a comparative analysis of the U.S. and Canadian experiences, in particular. Significant paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen (ten YLS students and five SOM students). Also MGT 661a. A. Dhir.

    Note: No drops will be approved after the YLS open add/drop period. Attendance at the first class meeting is required. The use of laptop computers (or other similar electronic note-taking devices) is not permitted. The course will follow the Law School calendar.

    Location: SLB - K190A (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10249

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    • 20125-01
    • The U.S. Senate as a Legal Institution
    • Feingold
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
      Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 4
    • -
    • open enrollment
    • exam required
    Expand

    The U.S. Senate as a Legal Institution (20125). 4 units. This course will familiarize students with major, and/or emerging legal and constitutional issues concerning the U.S. Senate. In so doing, it will examine (1) the Senate's nature as a complex legal institution and (2) the issue of the Senate's legitimacy in the context of the current and largely unprecedented criticism of the Senate from all parts of the political spectrum. The course should enable students critically to evaluate and use proper source material concerning new issues that are likely to arise in the future regarding the Senate.

    The first portion of the course will consider institutional legitimacy issues facing the Senate, including the appointment of senators to fill vacancies as well as disputes concerning Senate rules and procedures such as the filibuster and holds. The second part of the course will explore how the Senate interfaces with the Constitution and the Supreme Court. It will examine how senators should regard the issue of constitutionality in voting on legislation, be it campaign-finance reform, internet decency, or health care. This part of the course will also consider how senators should approach proposed constitutional amendments. The final portion of the course will review some of the wide range of issues that have emerged in recent years regarding the constitutional reltionship between the Senate and the Executive Branch, including the increasingly acrimonious issue of the standard to apply to executive appointments under the "advise and consent" power. Particular emphasis in this part of the course will be given to issues that have gained greater prominence since 9/11, including the relationship between enacted constitutional legislation and the presidential assertion of Article II powers, as well as the Senate's abdication of its Article I war-declaration power. Self-scheduled examination. R. Feingold.

    Location: SLB - 122 (Tue)
    SLB - 122 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10128
    Exam: 12/11/2017 - 12/20/2017
    Questions available online
    Name or Id: Id

    Close
    • 30123-01
    • Veterans Legal Services Clinic: Seminar
    • Wishnie
      Wenzloff
      Lado
    • Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Veterans Legal Services Clinic (30123) and Fieldwork (30124). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). The clinic and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. There are approximately 250,000 veterans currently residing in Connecticut, many with acute and unique legal needs related to their military service or return to civilian life. In this clinic, students represent Connecticut veterans in a range of individual litigation and institutional advocacy matters. Individual matters typically include (1) benefits applications for veterans who have suffered PTSD, sexual assault, toxic exposure, and other injuries, in the first instance, on administrative appeal, and on judicial review of administrative denials at the Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims or Federal Circuit; and (2) discharge upgrade applications, on administrative appeal and in U.S. District Court, including class-action litigation. Students also represent individual veterans and veterans organizations in Freedom of Information Act litigation in U.S. District Court; in civil rights litigation arising from sexual assault and other litigation alleging discriminatory treatment, in appeals to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and in federal and state regulatory and legislative advocacy. Students work in teams, and each student is assigned to represent one individual and one institutional/organizational client. The seminar portion is a practice-oriented examination of advocacy on behalf of veterans and of social justice lawyering generally. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, M. Engleman Lado, and A. Wenzloff.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among your experiential course selections, you must also submit a statement of interest in the clinic and a copy of your resume by the close of early registration on June 22, at 4:30 p.m. Students who are accepted in the clinic will be enrolled in the fieldwork section as well.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Tue)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10038

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    • 30124-01
    • Veterans Legal Services Fieldwork
    • Wishnie
      Wenzloff
      Lado
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Veteran Legal Services Fieldwork (30124). 2 units, credit/fail or graded at student option. Must be taken in conjunction with the Veteran Legal Services Clinic: Seminar. Permission of the instructors required. M.J. Wishnie, M. Engleman Lado, and A. Wenzloff.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in both the seminar and the fieldwork sections. It is not necessary to bid on the fieldwork component.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10039

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    • 20451-01
    • White Backlash in a Dramatically Changing Landscape: Seminar
    • Roithmayr
    • Wed 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
    • 2
    • -
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    White Backlash in a Dramatically Changing Landscape: Seminar (20451). 2 units. This seminar will investigate what commentators have called “whitelash"—a toxic mix of economic anxiety and racial resentment, seemingly triggered by recent civil rights gains, the election of the country’s first black president and a dramatically changing racial landscape in which whites will soon become a racial minority. This seminar is organized as a research lab. The first part of the course will cover historical antecedents for white political backlash following a number of events. Students will then decide together with the instructor on appropriate research methods and topics to investigate the existence and nature of this more recent white backlash--for example, doing theoretical and empirical research into whether the current phenomenon is rooted more in race or class, or whether whitelash is less backlash and more a continuation of long-term historical forces. Students will present research findings to the class as we go. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twelve. Permission of the instructor required. D. Roithmayr.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest in which they state their reasons for taking the course and their background in theoretical and empirical research by June 22 at 4:30 p.m.

    Location: SLB - 108 (Wed)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10109

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    • 30127-01
    • Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic: Seminar
    • Ahmad
      Wishnie
      Orihuela
      Loyo
    • Thu 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Responsibility,

      Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic (30127) and Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, graded or credit/fail, at student option, for each part (4 units total). Students will represent immigrants and low-wage workers in Connecticut in labor, immigration, and other civil rights areas, through litigation for individuals and non-litigation advocacy for community-based organizations. In litigation matters, students will handle cases at all stages of legal proceedings in Immigration Court, Board of Immigration Appeals, U.S. District Court, the Second Circuit, and state courts. The non-litigation work will include representation of grassroots organizations, labor and faith organizations in regulatory and legislative reform efforts, media advocacy, strategic planning, and other matters. The seminar portion is a practice-oriented examination of advocacy on behalf of workers and non-citizens and of social justice lawyering generally. The course will be a two-term offering (4 units each term). The clinical course and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously in both terms. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructors required. M.I. Ahmad, M.J. Wishnie, R. Loyo, and M. Orihuela.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing the clinic experiential permission courses, interested students should submit a resume and a statement of interest by June 22 at 4:30 p.m. It is not necessary to bid on the fieldwork section. Any student accepted to the clinic will automatically be enrolled in the fieldwork section.

    Note: Students admitted to WIRAC must confirm their participation in advance of the first class by a date designated by the instructors.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    Location: SLB - 109 (Thu)
    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10042

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    • 30128-01
    • Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy: Fieldwork
    • Ahmad
      Wishnie
      Orihuela
      Loyo
    • 2
    • Professional Skills,

      Experiential Requirement
    • experiential
    • not applicable
    Expand

    Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Fieldwork (30128). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. The clinical course and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously in both terms. M.I. Ahmad, M.J. Wishnie, and M. Orihuela.

    Course Bidding Information: Students who apply to the seminar section and are accepted will be enrolled in both the seminar and the fieldwork sections. Students should list only the seminar section among experiential course bidding selections.

    Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the follow non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork-only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.


    Grade mode: graded or credit/fail
    CRN: 10043

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    • 20236-01
    • Working with Intellectual Property: Patents and Trade Secrets
    • Cundiff
    • Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
    • 2
    • Professional Skills
    • faculty permission
    • paper required
    Expand

    Working with Intellectual Property: Patents and Trade Secrets (20236). 2 units. This course will examine current issues in intellectual property by focusing on the activities of lawyers who litigate and advise on patent and other intellectual property issues. We will examine trade secrets law as apractical and analytical counterpoint to patent law. Casebooks present, debate and evaluate the conclusions courts have reached in significant cases. This course will discuss how lawyers develop the evidence and arguments that lead decision makers to reach their conclusions and will examine working arrangements and disputes that frequently do not make their way into court at all. The course will examine documents such as protest letters, pleadings, various kinds of licensing agreements, deposition transcripts, expert reports, briefs, and other "building blocks" underlying reported decisions, as well as applicable statutory and case law authority. Guest lecturers who have had significant influence in shaping intellectual property law will participate in a number of our classes; past visitors have included lawyers who have argued leading cases, a Judge from the Federal Circuit, an author of leading intellectual property treatises, entrepreneurs, and lawyers representing major industry and policy organizations in the intellectual property arena. Instead of an exam, students will prepare and present reaction papers and problem-solving documents (e.g., protest letters, argument/negotiation outlines, proposed orders for relief, and settlement proposals) throughout the semester individually and as part of a group. Prior experience in intellectual property law is helpful but not required. This course is not a survey of intellectual property law issues. It complements other intellectual property courses offered by the School. Instructor will be able to accept a limited number of papers in satisfaction of the Substantial Paper requirement. Paper required. Enrollment limited to fifteen to eighteen. Permission of the instructor required. V.A. Cundiff.

    Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among your permission-of-the-instructor selections, please submit a brief statement of interest describing your interest in and any prior experience (which is not required) in intellectual property (academic or otherwise) and past legal writing by 4:30 p.m. on June 22. This information will be used to tailor the course to the participants.

    Location: SLB - L48 (Mon)
    Grade mode: graded
    CRN: 10062

    Close