These tools are optimized for Chrome or Firefox.

Terms

Spring 2016

Spring 2017

Spring 2018

Recently Added Courses


Spring 2018


Cancelled Courses


Spring 2018

    • 21571-01
    • Executive Branch Agencies: Current Administrative Law Scholarship
    • Jolls, Christine
    • 11-15-2017 4:18 PM

Change Log


Spring 2018

    • 30166-01
    • Fox, Lawrence
    • Description changed to:
      Ethics Bureau at Yale: Pro Bono Professional Responsibility Advice and Advocacy (30166). 3 units. Lawyers' need for ethics advice, consultation and expert opinions is not limited to those whose clients can pay. Impecunious clients and the lawyers who serve them are in need of ethics counseling and legal opinions on a regular basis. For example, Yale law students have provided essential assistance preparing amicus briefs in numerous Supreme Court cases. A few of these cases resulted in victory for the petitioner and citations to the amicus brief in the majority opinions.

      The work of the Bureau consists of four major components. First, the Bureau provides ethics counseling for pro bono organizations such as legal services offices, public defenders, and other NGO’s. Second, the Bureau prepares standard-of-care opinions relating to the conduct of lawyers, prosecutors and judges that are required in cases alleging ineffective assistance of counsel and other challenges to lawyer and judicial conduct. Third, from time to time, the Yale Ethics Bureau provides assistance to amici curiae, typically bar associations or ethics professors, on questions of professional responsibility in cases in which such issues are front and center. It did so in a United States Supreme Court case, Maples v. Allen, citing the amicus brief of the clinic. The clinic also prepared a brief for Williams v. Pennsylvania, with the brief cited by several Justices in oral arguments. Fourth, the Bureau provides ethics opinions for the National Association of Public Defenders, position papers for various American Bar Association entities, articles for law reviews and other publications, and editorials on topics of current interest.

      The students working at the Bureau meet for class two hours per week and are expected to put in approximately ten hours on Bureau projects each week. The classroom work explores the law governing lawyers, but also considers the role of expert witnesses in the litigation process, its appropriateness and the procedural issues thereby raised. No prerequisites. Preference given to prior Ethics Bureau enrollees and students who previously took a course in professional responsibility. This clinic is yearlong and students must commit to two semesters. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. L. Fox.

      Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among their experiential course selections, interested students should also submit a short statement of interest by the close of the bidding period on December 7 at 4:30 p.m. In the statement, students should address the reasons why they seek admission to the clinic and a commitment that they are willing to enroll for a minimum of two semesters.Note: We expect to add no more than three students for the Spring, with a preference for first-year and second-year students.

      Note: Attendance at the first class meeting is required. There is a no-drop policy for this course.

      Time changed from:
      TBD
      to:
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 11/07/2017
    • 21358-01
    • Brilmayer, Roberta
    • Enrollment Restriction from:
      LimitedEnrollment
      to:
      Open Enrollment
    • 11/14/2017
    • 21334-01
    • Forman, James
    • Description changed to:
      Inside Out: Issues in Criminal Justice (21334). 4 units. In this course on the criminal justice system, students will meet weekly inside a Connecticut state prison and study alongside ten incarcerated students. Students will discuss a range of topics, including the causes and consequences of crime, policing, sentencing, and drug policy. We will discuss questions of resilience and redemption, through readings from formerly incarcerated youth who have achieved success in academia and law. Paper required. Enrollment limited to seven Law students. Permission of the instructor required. J. Forman, Jr.

      Course Bidding: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should submit a CV and a statement of interest of no more than 300 words by December 7 at 4:30 p.m. In your satement of interest, please indicate (1) your reason or reasons for wanting to take the class and (2) any background in criminal justice issues. Though Professor Forman asks about background in criminal justice issues, you do not need any to be admitted. Professor Forman's goal is to attract a mix of students from a range of backgrounds.

      Note: Admitted students will receive an e-mail efore the beginning of the semester asking them to confirm their spot in the class. After confirming, students will not be permitted to drop the class.

      Also note: The class will meet from 10:10 until noon at Carl Robinson Correctional Institute, located in Enfield, Connecticut, about one hour and fifteen minutes from New Haven. As a result, students enrolled in this class will not be able to take another class staring before 2:10 p.m.

    • 11/14/2017
    • 21184-01
    • Eggleston, W Neil
    • Description changed to:
      Presidential Power in an Age of Conflict: Seminar (21184). 2 units. This course will explore the modern exercise of presidential power in foreign affairs, military and covert actions, domestic affairs, and executive actions. We will consider the Necessary and Proper Clause and the Take Care Clause; the President's war powers, treaty and other diplomatic authorities; the appointment and confirmation of judges and other officials; and the power to grant pardons and commutations. Throughout, the course will examine the ways in which executive branch conflicts with the other two branches of government are addressed and resolved. The course will also examine recent efforts by the states to use judicial processes to register objections to executive branch policy actions. While focusing on contemporary issues and recent disputes, the course will draw on historical precedent to give students a grounded and contextual understanding of presidential power. Paper required. Enrollment limited to twenty-two. W.N. Eggleston.

      Note: This course is open only to second-year and third-year J.D. students; it is not open to first-year J.D. students, to M.S.L. students, or to LL.M. students.

    • 11/14/2017
    • 21063-01
    • Witt, John
    • Description changed to:
      American Legal History (21063). 2 or 3 units. Law and the legal profession in American life from the Founding to the late 20th century with readings from the primary sources and the scholarly literature. Subjects include: (1) the public and private roles of lawyers: the lawyer in government and in politics; the modern law firm and its discontents; cause lawyering and its dilemmas; lawyers in a slave society; (2) the role of courts in American government: courts and American democracy; administrative regulation and the common law; economic growth and economic inequality; (3) punishment and the criminal law: lawyers and punishment in American history; the invention and spread of the prison; the incarceration phenomenon and its alternatives; (4) lawyers and the Constitution: the lawyers of 1787; lawyers and the Reconstruction amendments; courts and the Constitution; social movements and the constitution; and (5) lawyers and law in emergencies: ethical dilemmas in wartime; the rise of the military lawyer; habeas corpus and the laws of armed conflict in the American experience. Scheduled examination for 2 units; a paper option for students with a focused proposal in the history of American law (for 3 units). Also HIST 760b. J.F. Witt.

      Note: This course meets the Law School professional responsibility requirement. It has also been submitted to the New York State Court of Appeals for consideration of approval for the New York Bar professional responsibility requirement. We will notify students whether or not it has been approved once we hear from the court.

      Time changed from:
      TBD
      to:
      Wed 8:10 AM-10:00 AM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 11/17/2017