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Spring 2015

Spring 2016

Spring 2017

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Fall 2016

Spring 2017


Change Log


Spring 2017

    • 21520-01
    • Sadurski, Wojciech
    • Meeting Time changed from:
      Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room

      to:
      Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 06/01/2016
    • 30187-01
    • Lado, Marianne
    • Description changed to:
      Environmental Justice Clinic: Practice and the Intersection of Civil Rights and the Environment (30187). 4 units. Students will have the opportunity to help launch Yale Law School’s new environmental justice clinic and to develop a docket to improve environmental quality and public health in communities of color and low-income communities. In the wake of a national conversation about the water crisis in Flint and lead poisoning across the country, students will be in on the ground floor as the Clinic takes on cases to address inequality in the distribution of health hazards as well as procedural inequities faced by community members seeking to assert their own vision for the future of their neighborhoods, towns and cities. The clinic’s work will include cases and advocacy projects to enforce civil rights in the environmental context, working with clients to develop legal and advocacy strategies to reform EPA’s civil rights compliance and enforcement program and to address issues of environmental injustice in particular communities.

      Students will work in teams under faculty supervision and take responsibility for litigation and advocacy. Their activities will include the following:
      • Working directly with clients, co-counsel, opposing counsel, allies, environmental agencies, and EPA;
      • Developing case records by conducting factual investigation and working with experts;
      • Legal analysis, memos, pleadings and drafting other legal documents (such as public disclosure requests, comments on federal rules, etc.);
      • Representation of clients;
      • Negotiations and settlement.

      In addition to civil rights compliance and enforcement in the environmental context, the Clinic will evaluate potential litigation and advocacy to address the sources and impacts of air and water contamination in disproportionately affected communities, with a focus on communities in New England.

      Students will also participate in a seminar intended to explore issues raised by the clinical practice, including both substantive issues of environmental and civil rights law, as well as questions related to practice, including ethical and social dimensions of lawyering in this context. The seminar will meet approximately two hours per week. In addition to class meetings and preparation, clinic participants must complete and document approximately fifteen hours of clinical work per week. Students will also be expected to participated in weekly one-hour team meetings. While there is no prerequisite for the clinic, participants should have a strong interest in working on behalf of environmentally overburdened communities — often communities of color and low-income communities. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. M.E. Lado.

      Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, students should submit a CV and a short statement expressing interest in the clinic, which will focus on environmental issues affecting communities of color and low-incom communities and, particularly, civil rights enforcement in the environmental context. The statement should be no more than one page in length.

      Note: First-day attendance is required unless permission for absence is granted by the instructor in advance of the first meeting.

      Meeting Time changed from:
      Tue 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room

      to:
      Wed 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 06/15/2016
    • 21107-01
    • Kysar, Douglas
    • Description changed to:
      Law, Environment, and Religion: A Communion of Subjects (21107). 2 or 3 units. Thomas Berry once wrote, “The universe is a communion of subjects, not a collection of objects.” One might also insist that the university is a communion of subjects, not a collection of disciplines. Perhaps no subject better illustrates this point than the environment, for to understand and appreciate the environment requires expertise from multiple intellectual traditions, including history, religion, philosophy, anthropology, aesthetics, economics, political science, and legal studies.

      This course will focus on the scholarship and practice of leading figures working at the intersection of law, environment, and religion, who will be brought to campus to participate in a discussion series that will form the core of the course. In preparation for these visits, teams of students will be assigned to study deeply the writing and actions of a designated speaker. Class sessions during this preparatory phase will resemble a traditional graduate seminar, with readings and discussion designed to stimulate engagement with the most challenging and vital questions facing the “communion” of law, environment, and religion. During the core phase of the course, speakers will interact with students in multiple ways. The central activity will be an in-depth interview led by members of the student team.

      Other students will conduct a podcast interview with the speaker at Yale’s audio recording studio; these podcast interviews, which are intended to engage the speaker in a more personal conversation about his or her life history, values, and worldviews, will be posted on Yale's iTunes University site. One of the conceits of the academy is often that such subjective elements have little bearing on one’s intellectual work. As a result, too little attention is paid within the university to the role of family, community, religion, and other critical biographical factors in shaping one’s ideas. Enrollment limited to twenty-four, of which eight places are for Law students. Permission of the instructors required. Also F&ES 808b/REL 926b. D. Kysar, J.A. Grim, M.E. Tucker.

      Course Selection: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-instructor selections, students should email a CV and brief statement of interest to jennifer.marshall@yale.edu by December 8 at 4:30 p.m.

      Note: Students must attend the first meeting of the course in order to stay enrolled.
      Units Indicator changed from:
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      to:
      or
    • 06/15/2016

Fall 2016

    • 20311-01
    • Lawrence, Frederick
    • Description changed to:
      Higher Education and the Law (20311). 1 or 2 units. Higher education plays a singular role in our society. Colleges and universities are complex organizations and institutions with unique missions to discover, create and transmit knowledge, and to further social mobility. Higher education intersects with the law in a myriad of ways. This course will examine the legal issues that shape higher education, particularly in the United States. The course will cover accessibility to and financing of higher education, academic freedom, shared governance, admissions, free expression, privacy and freedom of association, campus safety with a particular focus on sexual assault, and issues of race, disability, gender and sexual orientation. We will consider student rights and responsibilities, faculty issues concerning research ethics and the classroom, and the roles of presidents, governing boards, and university general counsels. Materials include relevant statutes and cases as well as readings from related fields. Our goal throughout the course will be to understand the breadth of issues faced by higher education in the United States in pursuing its mission, and the ways in which legal rules and norms relate to these issues. Students taking the course for 1 unit, credit/fail, will submit four reaction papers (roughly 750 words each); students taking the course for 2 graded units will submit three reaction papers and a research paper of at least 7500 words. Students must elect the course for the credit/fail option for 1 unit, or the graded option for 2 units by the end of the second week of the term on the specific date published by the Registrar's Office in the Important Dates and Deadlines> Paper required. Enrollment capped at eighteen. F.M. Lawrence.

      Note:The class will meet every other week on the following dates, all Thursdays: September 1, September 15, September 29, October 13, October 27, November 10, and December 1. Attendance at the first class is required.

      Meeting Time changed from:
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room

      to:
      Thu 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 05/31/2016
    • 20311-01
    • Lawrence, Frederick
    • Description changed to:
      Higher Education and the Law (20311). 1 or 2 units. Higher education plays a singular role in our society. Colleges and universities are complex organizations and institutions with unique missions to discover, create and transmit knowledge, and to further social mobility. Higher education intersects with the law in a myriad of ways. This course will examine the legal issues that shape higher education, particularly in the United States. The course will cover accessibility to and financing of higher education, academic freedom, shared governance, admissions, free expression, privacy and freedom of association, campus safety with a particular focus on sexual assault, and issues of race, disability, gender and sexual orientation. We will consider student rights and responsibilities, faculty issues concerning research ethics and the classroom, and the roles of presidents, governing boards, and university general counsels. Materials include relevant statutes and cases as well as readings from related fields. Our goal throughout the course will be to understand the breadth of issues faced by higher education in the United States in pursuing its mission, and the ways in which legal rules and norms relate to these issues. Students taking the course for 1 unit, credit/fail, will submit four reaction papers (roughly 750 words each); students taking the course for 2 graded units will submit three reaction papers and a research paper of at least 7500 words. Students must elect the course for the credit/fail option for 1 unit, or the graded option for 2 units by the end of the second week of the term on the specific date published by the Registrar's Office in the Important Dates and Deadlines Paper required. Enrollment capped at eighteen. F.M. Lawrence.

      Note:The class will meet every other week on the following dates, all Thursdays: September 1, September 15, September 29, October 13, October 27, November 10, and November 17. Attendance at the first class is required.

    • 06/03/2016
    • 20355-01
    • Goldsmith, Jack
    • Meeting Time changed from:
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room

      to:
      Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 06/06/2016
    • 20675-01
    • Sitaraman, Ganesh
    • Meeting Time changed from:
      Tue 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room

      to:
      Tue 6:10 PM-8:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 06/13/2016
    • 20616-01
    • Kesselheim, Aaron
    • Meeting Time changed from:
      Mon 10:10 AM-12:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room

      to:
      Mon 4:10 PM-6:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 06/15/2016
    • 30186-01
    • Noveck, Beth
    • Description changed to:
      Open Government and Open Data Governance Innovation Clinic (30186). 3 units, credit/fail with a graded option. The Open Government and Open Data Governance Innovation Clinic supports the strengthening of democratic institutions by using legal and technological innovations to transform how we govern. In this clinic, we will work with clients in government and other public institutions on projects designed to enable them to work more openly and collaboratively to make better decisions and solve public problems to improve people’s lives. Our mission is three-fold: to help institutions innovate and become more effective at achieving their mission through the application of new technologies including big data and collective intelligence; to promote the public’s right to participate in governing in ways that tap people’s talents, creativity, and interests; and to empower twenty-first-century lawyers-as-problem solvers by developing new skills in governance innovation. Paper required. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. B.S. Noveck.

      Course Bidding: In additional to ranking this clinic among experiential course selections, students should submit a CV and short statement of interest by the close of the bidding period, June 23 at 4:30 p.m.

    • 06/21/2016