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Terms

Spring 2015

Spring 2016

Spring 2017
Bidding Open

Recently Added Courses


Spring 2017


Cancelled Courses


Spring 2017

    • 21626-01
    • American Foreign Policy Issues
    • Gewirtz, Paul
    • 12-01-2016 3:54 PM
    • 21080-01
    • Research Methods in American Legal History
    • Nann, John
    • 11-29-2016 7:39 PM
    • 30173-01
    • Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic
    • Metcalf, Hope
    • 11-18-2016 3:24 PM
    • 30137-01
    • Advocacy for Children and Youth: Fieldwork
    • Peters, Jean Koh
    • 11-08-2016 3:04 PM
    • 30101-01
    • Advocacy for Children and Youth Clinic: Seminar
    • Peters, Jean Koh
    • 10-27-2016 3:26 PM
    • 21063-01
    • American Legal History
    • Priest, Claire
    • 10-27-2016 2:18 PM

Change Log


Spring 2017

    • 21777-01
    • Markovits, Daniel
    • Title from:
      Meritocracy and Inequality: Supervised Research
      to:
      Meritocracy and Inequality: Seminar Time changed from:
      TBD
      to:
      Mon 2:10 PM-4:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 11/09/2016
    • 21136-01
    • Jolls, Christine
    • Time changed from:
      TBD
      to:
      Thu 11:10 AM-1:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 11/10/2016
    • 30134-01
    • Birckhead, Tamar
    • Description changed to:
      Juvenile Justice Clinic: Fieldwork (30134). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option. Must be taken simultaneously with the seminar portion. Open only to JD students. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. T.R. Birckhead.

      Course Bidding: Students who bid on and are accepted in the seminar portion of the clinic will be automatically enrolled in the fieldwork section. Students do not need to bid on the fieldwork section.

      Note: New students who are accepted into this clinic must attend a one-day intensive session to prepare for their first client meetings and court appearances. For the Spring 2017 clinic, this all-day session will be held on Friday, January 13 from 9:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. Attendance is required.

      Note: Because of the frequency of court appearances, students must keep two mornings a week (Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m., and 2 - 4 p.m.) free from other obligations. Due to immediate commitments to our clients, Professor Birckhead will finalize the roster by email before the first class, after which the clinic cannot be dropped. Because classes prepare students for client work, attendance at all classes is mandatory.

      Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance; Prosecution Externship.

    • 11/10/2016
    • 30133-01
    • Birckhead, Tamar
    • Description changed to:
      Juvenile Justice Clinic (30133) and Fieldwork (30134). 2 units, credit/fail, with a graded option, for each part (4 units total). The clinic and fieldwork must be taken simultaneously. Students represent children and youth in juvenile cases in the Superior Court for Juvenile Matters courthouse on Whalley Avenue in New Haven. Students handle all aspects of their clients' cases under the direct supervision of clinical faculty. Students learn how to build relationships with clients and their families, investigate and develop their cases, construct persuasive case theories, negotiate with opposing counsel, prepare motions and briefs, and advocate for youth in court. Students also explore the legal framework governing the representation of youth in juvenile delinquency cases, including the rules of professional responsibility. Throughout, students are encouraged to think critically about the operation of the juvenile justice system and to reflect on opportunities for reform. Class will meet weekly with occasional supplemental sessions to be arranged. Additionally, students will attend weekly case supervision sessions. Because of the frequency of court appearances, students must keep two days each week (Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday, 9 a.m–1 p.m. and 2 - 4 p.m.) free from other obligations. Open only to JD students. Enrollment limited. Permission of the instructor required. T.R. Birckhead.

      Note: New students who are accepted into this clinic must attend a one-day intensive session to prepare for their first client meetings and court appearances. For the Spring 2017 clinic, this all-day session will be held on Friday, January 13 from 9:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. Attendance is required.

      Course Bidding: In addition to listing this clinic among experiential course selections, interested students must submit a statement of interest, a CV, and a signed statement of understanding the commitment to continued case work until graduation by the close of the bidding period on December 8.

      Note: Due to our immediate commitments to our clients, Professor Birckhead will finalize the roster by email before the first class, after which the clinic cannot be dropped. Because classes prepare students for client work, attendance at all classes is mandatory.

      Note: Students may not be enrolled in an LSO clinic and any of the following non-LSO clinics in the same semester, whether as a student director, fieldwork only returning student, continuing student, or otherwise: Education Adequacy Project; Legal Assistance: Prosecution Externship.

    • 11/10/2016
    • 21582-01
    • Cunningham, Noel
    • Time changed from:
      TBD
      to:
      Mon 10:10 AM-1:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 11/10/2016
    • 21209-01
    • Chua, Amy
    • Description changed to:
      International Business Transactions (21209). 4 units. An introduction to the formation, regulation, and global impact of international business transactions. The primary focus of the course will be on the legal and practical aspects of cross-border transactions, including the structuring, negotiation, and documentation of the relevant arrangements. A secondary focus will be on the broader economic, political, and social context and consequences of international business transactions. Case studies from Latin America, Asia, the former Soviet Union, and the Middle East will be used. Topics to be discussed include privatization, project finance, letters of credit, conflicts of law, extraterritoriality, sovereign debt restructuring, expropriation, corruption, and the relationships among markets, democracy, and "culture." Enrollment will be limited to seventy. Permission of the instructor required. Paper required. A. Chua.

      Course Selection Information: In addition to listing this course among permission-of-the-instructor selections, students should submit a statement of interest and a CV by 4:30 pm on December 8. Priority will be given to first-year students for approximately half the places and the remaining seats will be allocated to students in their second and third years.

    • 11/16/2016
    • 21520-01
    • Sadurski, Wojciech
    • Description changed to:
      Comparative Constitutional Law (21520). 2 units. This course will provide an overview of comparative constitutional law, through reading and discussion of recent scholarship that has helped to define the subject. The emphasis will be on bringing together (a) the main theories of constitutionalism, and critical responses that they triggered; (b) diverse regions that have been the scene of constitution-making in recent decades (Central and Eastern Europe, East Asia, South Africa, Latin and South America), in comparison with more 'consolidated' constitutional systems (US, Western Europe, Australia), and (c) some of the main dimensions of constitutionalism but with a firm focus on the question of judicial review and constitutional rights.

      The first, introductory part of the course (sessions 1 and 2) will be devoted to the very idea of 'constitutionalism' and different approaches to constitutional entrenchment in different systems around the world.

      The second part (sessions 3-6) will look at the question of constitutional review in different systems through the prism of three variants: abstractness, ex ante / ex post, and finality of review. We will also discuss two leading theories of the role of constitutional review in new and consolidated democracies: the theory of 'juristocracy' (Hirschl) and 'the insurance model' of judicial review (Ginsburg).

      The third part (sessions 7-11) will discuss three main questions with which constitutions around the world have to deal: protection of individual rights, designing the rules for constitution making and amending, and identifying the dominant patterns of constitutional interpretation, with special emphasis on proportionality analysis and on the idea of “public reason” as a proposed standard for judging unconstitutional legislative motivations.

      The fourth part (sessions 12-13) will deal with challenges resulting from non-democratic forces, either preceding or questioning democratic constitutionalism; we will discuss "transitional constitutionalism", "militant democracy" as enforced by democratic constitutionalism, and a specially troubling case study of coping with hate speech. The last part (session 14) will discuss so called "supranational constitutionalism" -- a 'translation' of nation-state constitutionalism to the supranational level.

      There will be a set of reading materials with links to electronic resources held by the Law School Library, and one main recommended book: Wojciech Sadurski, Rights before Courts (2nd ed., Springer 2014).

      Assessment: (1) Each student will be expected to write two or three (depending on the total number of students enrolled) “response papers” of 2-3 pages during the term, raising issues for discussion related to the readings (30%). Those papers will have to be submitted by Friday afternoon prior to a session at which they will be discussed. (2) This is a discussion-based seminar, and class participation will be encouraged (20%). Students are required to read the literature prior to each class. (3) There will be a final essay (50%), on a topic of choice (as approved by the lecturer), to be submitted by the end of the examination session (approx. 3000 words). Paper required. W. Sadurski.

    • 11/16/2016
    • 21487-01
    • Miguel-Stearns, Teresa
    • Description changed to:
      Legal Research in International Law (21487). 1 unit, credit/fail. Explores methods for finding the major sources of international law, including treaties and customary law; the material from the UN and other inter-governmental organizations; and laws from nations other than the United States. Particular attention is paid to practical research issues and solutions using both print and electronic resources. Research interests of the class and other specialized topics may also be explored. Minimum enrollment of seven required. The skills requirement may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1-unit legal research course. This course will meet weekly for seven weeks in the second half of the term. E. Ma and T. Miguel-Stearns.

    • 11/29/2016
    • 21493-01
    • Krishnaswami, Julie
    • Description changed to:
      Research Methods in Statutory and Regulatory Law (21493). 1 unit, credit/fail. This course will teach students to research statutes, agency regulations, agency cases, and other sources of statutory and administrative law, using a variety of print and online sources. The goal of the course is to give students an understanding of the sophisticated research skills required for finding statutory and administrative authority in its various forms including: legislative history, enabling statutes, proposed and final agency regulations, decisions, opinions and policy and executive orders. Emphasis will be on researching using free, government resources, but students will also learn how to conduct regulatory research using directories and other databases. Although the primary focus of this course will be on researching federal statutory and administrative law, one class session will be devoted to researching state and local administrative law. Students will be evaluated based on class participation and on a final research project focused on a regulatory issue and agency of their choosing. The skills requirement may be satisfied by taking this course with another 1-unit legal research course. This course will meet weekly for seven weeks in the first half of the term. J. Graves-Krishnaswami, S. Matheson, and M. VanderHeijden.
    • 11/29/2016
    • 30103-01
    • Lemar, Anika
    • Time changed from:
      TBD
      to:
      Tue 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
      Thu 10:40 AM-12:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 11/29/2016
    • 30190-01
    • Koh, Harold
    • Time changed from:
      TBD
      to:
      Tue 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
      Fri 12:10 PM-2:00 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 11/29/2016
    • 21204-01
    • Janger, Edward
    • Time changed from:
      TBD
      to:
      Mon 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
      Wed 4:10 PM-5:35 PM
            TBD Building TBD Room
    • 11/30/2016